If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Mother Jones)   What five Occupy Wall Street protesters are doing now - one year later after the occupation   (motherjones.com) divider line 35
    More: Interesting, Occupy Wall Street, Zuccotti Park, Lord of the Flies, Zuccotti, employees, Henry David Thoreau, Mall of America, industrial agriculture  
•       •       •

13278 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Sep 2012 at 2:40 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-09-18 03:00:21 PM  
4 votes:

skullkrusher: I thought Mother Jones was a progressive paper? Why is it trying to make occupiers look like exactly the opposite of righteous, everyman fed up with corporatism?.


It's called "telling the truth"
2012-09-18 02:51:20 PM  
4 votes:

skullkrusher: I thought Mother Jones was a progressive paper? Why is it trying to make occupiers look like exactly the opposite of righteous, everyman fed up with corporatism?

"I felt like I was making too much money"... wow, dude.


Although the first part of the quote is stupid, the second part - "and I wasn't happy" speaks volumes.

You can take any job in the world, but if you're not happy with it, you're going to be miserable. Doesn't matter how much money you make.

I was in a job for five years in which I was miserable but I was making good money. I actually took a job that paid less than what I was making (it wasn't a huge financial cut, but it was sizable in relation to benefits) for happiness.
2012-09-18 03:10:30 PM  
3 votes:

OldManDownDRoad: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: ModernLuddite: This is why America has no left: the "movement" is composed of individualists who can't abandon their own extreme myopia in favor of building this utopia.


Like the farmer who criticizes cities. No one is going to get on board with abandoning cities. Ever. That's not even a discussion.

Yeah, it was especially ironic considering the anti-city guy moved to New York and then to San Francisco.

Back in the late 60s and early 70s, my family had several groups of people approach us about living in the several old houses that were in various states of decay around our farm (we live close to UNC and Duke). Sure, we thought, charge them a minimal rent and see what happens. My grandfather, still alive at the time, was amused by the groups and took them under his wing, teaching them skills like how to build a fire in the fireplace - none of these houses had central heat or even plumbing. So he also taught them how to build/maintain outhouses.

A few of them started gardens but found out that between the mold, the insects, and the deer there's not much left for human consumption.

In a ten-year period, three of the five houses were burned to the ground by one accident or another. Luckily no one was hurt - well, except for the woman murdered by her biker boyfriend, who was in turn murdered by her brother. Anyway, after a while these folks discovered that farming is, well, HARD WORK. They all drifted off to find jobs inside, with air conditioning and plumbing.

About two years ago I spotted a car parked at one of the remaining houses. I walked over and found a couple of the original group, come back for a nostalgic visit. We had a nice chat and they offered condolences on the death of my father and grandfather, and we had a few laughs about their little experiment. Judging by the car (a new Audi) and their suits, I don't think they are still farming.

Sunday afternoon I was sitting on my breezeway, enjoying life, when a young guy ...


That is one of the coolest stories I have read on FARK.
2012-09-18 03:04:58 PM  
3 votes:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: ModernLuddite: This is why America has no left: the "movement" is composed of individualists who can't abandon their own extreme myopia in favor of building this utopia.


Like the farmer who criticizes cities. No one is going to get on board with abandoning cities. Ever. That's not even a discussion.

Yeah, it was especially ironic considering the anti-city guy moved to New York and then to San Francisco.


Back in the late 60s and early 70s, my family had several groups of people approach us about living in the several old houses that were in various states of decay around our farm (we live close to UNC and Duke). Sure, we thought, charge them a minimal rent and see what happens. My grandfather, still alive at the time, was amused by the groups and took them under his wing, teaching them skills like how to build a fire in the fireplace - none of these houses had central heat or even plumbing. So he also taught them how to build/maintain outhouses.

A few of them started gardens but found out that between the mold, the insects, and the deer there's not much left for human consumption.

In a ten-year period, three of the five houses were burned to the ground by one accident or another. Luckily no one was hurt - well, except for the woman murdered by her biker boyfriend, who was in turn murdered by her brother. Anyway, after a while these folks discovered that farming is, well, HARD WORK. They all drifted off to find jobs inside, with air conditioning and plumbing.

About two years ago I spotted a car parked at one of the remaining houses. I walked over and found a couple of the original group, come back for a nostalgic visit. We had a nice chat and they offered condolences on the death of my father and grandfather, and we had a few laughs about their little experiment. Judging by the car (a new Audi) and their suits, I don't think they are still farming.

Sunday afternoon I was sitting on my breezeway, enjoying life, when a young guy drove up into the yard and asked if he could speak to me for a few minutes. Sure enough, he wanted to know if he could move into the old house and plant a garden in return for helping me around the farm. I'm still mulling that over, these days I'm more worried about being sued if he burns the place down around his ears. But, it would be kind of fun to have some hippies around again.
2012-09-18 02:51:39 PM  
3 votes:
The Occupiers will end up just like the Hippies. Some of them will continue to live up to the ideals that they are espousing, but most of them will melt back into mainstream America.
2012-09-18 02:50:04 PM  
3 votes:
So one moved to a "hippie enclave" in San Francisco, one is a part-time bartender, one is a junkie, one quit his law firm because he was "making too much money" and one just enrolled in law school.

Pretty much what you'd expect.
2012-09-18 05:41:09 PM  
2 votes:
"Caucasian Islamophile"? Was she hoping she get to be the widow of a Jihadist?

Also one more vote for the Laywers stupidity. If you want to help people and you are making too much money (70k bonuses mind you) its absolutely more effective for you to slave away in misery and award large sums to charity. If one is truly Liberal and not bootstrappy then crunching the numbers says that staying at a high paying attorney position and giving to charity is far more effective than trying to do good in person A 70k bonus itself might add a health practioner at a clinic somewhere. Do not understand why even when a Liberal HAS the assets to help he still wants to not use his own resources if he can use some else's. On the heart string side, How bad could it be to work as a high paid, but generous attorney as opposed to being indigent?
2012-09-18 04:16:27 PM  
2 votes:
I was at Zucotti last year. I ran into some of the people from that article. Bobby Copper was probably the most key figure in that movement by virtue of the fact that the sanitation did a miraculous job. Zucotti is a park probably that has less acreage then a lot of people's backyards. You had about thousand people crammed into that space with very little mess considering there was no toilets, no running water, no permanent shelters. The city would have kicked the occupiers months sooner if it wasn't for his efforts and ability to coordinate.

However Occupy Wall Street was a success. It brought back a conversation on labor, politics, the effects of capital on democracy. That's something we haven't talk about as nation in decades. Yeah the reforms are slow. Yes, shiat like the dismantling of the Glass-Stegall act and the Citizen United ruling (the biggest decisions from supreme court since Roe v. Wade) has failed to be appealed. Whether or not we can save ourselves has yet to be seen. I think we can change the course and ourselves in time. Though things may have to get a lot worse for people to understand fully.
2012-09-18 04:12:31 PM  
2 votes:
I mentioned several times that protesting is a romantic, youthful idealistic pastime, but it's very ignorable and it's not very constructive, and it usually fizzles out when it smacks the cold, hard slab of reality. It is a three year old throwing a tantrum on the kitchen floor, only it's a group of adults doing it in a public setting.

Protesting by itself has a very low percentage rate insomuch as achieving any of its aims (if those aims are at all concrete and realistic). The teeming examples throughout history have shown protests of being everything from peaceful to violent, from intellectual to ignorant, from earnest to goofy to celebratory. Protests have encapsulated all types of moods, settings and public atmospheres, from rage-filled riots to meditative hunger strikes. If there's one commonality among all protests, it's that the actual protest itself does very little to change the status quo.

It's what happens after the protest that matters.

Protests are good at raising awareness and identifying problems. They are not good at finding solutions. If the problems are already well-known, then the protests are superfluous. Protesting can be a catalyst for change but it is not change itself. Change can only come via one of three ways (or all three), and this is something the OWS movement failed to understand. The movement was ignored by the insulating elites because so long as none of the protestors obtained any real power, there was nothing to fear. The system is unaffected -- OWS can starve on the street or be kicked out by the Police, it doesn't really matter.

Summed up, Occupy Wall Street was doomed. It was doomed because it never obtained any power. Real power. The kind of power that the Police don't kick out of the park. As I said, there are three ways to do this:

Politically: Since the system is rotten to the core and all elected officials and those running for office are wholly subsidiaries of the kleptocratic plutocracy raping the nation, this is not a partisan issue but a populace one. OWS should have put forth its own candidates, have them run for office and win, and have them propose legislation in OWS' favor. No existing candidate or representatives subscribe to this mandate. The only way to truly change the process is to replace the corrupt seeds currently poisoning it. And make sure the replacements are incorruptible.

Economically: Money (or lack thereof) is a powerful motivator and it makes everything move faster, better, and with a purpose. Most of OWS hated money and Capitalism and it failed to understand that the system is not going away and the only way to change the system is to use money to influence it (and no, this is not a contradiction). Capitalism is not the problem. Capitalism itself has no ethical or moral value -- it is just a tool, like a hammer, and like any hammer you can use it to build a house or bash someone's skull in. There's nothing sinful about making money and using that money to further your private and public ventures. That's what all rich people do. That's what OWS didn't.

Militarily: I'm not actually advocating this option, just pointing out that it's available and has been known to be quite successful in the past. If the other two options are not feasible and there is no further recourse and they have nothing to lose, then OWS should have organized into an army and physically (and violently) stormed the seats of power and ruthlessly tossed out the ones who have broken the nation. This is very much the desperation option, when there is no hope to avoid eternal serfdom. Ironically, while they live in a country where firearms are freely obtainable and they had the numbers, OWS failed to take the crucial step from protest to populist uprising.

OWS started out broke, unarmed and leaderless, and that is why they failed, because there is no such group in history that has ever achieved power with these three traits.
2012-09-18 03:24:29 PM  
2 votes:
Lots of people in here saying "I don't give a fark." Thanks for sharing.

/methinks thou doth protest too much.
2012-09-18 03:22:32 PM  
2 votes:

RanDomino: WTFDYW
In a ten-year period, three of the five houses were burned to the ground by one accident or another.

Was it foxfire?


Heh.

In order:

1. Chimney fire
2. Kerosene lamp knocked over (altho I suspect the bong got in the way)
3. Hot grease on woodstove

Oh, yeah, and another little bit of information for you prospective homesteaders - deer absolutely love cannabis sprouts.
2012-09-18 02:52:19 PM  
2 votes:
This is why America has no left: the "movement" is composed of individualists who can't abandon their own extreme myopia in favor of building this utopia.


Like the farmer who criticizes cities. No one is going to get on board with abandoning cities. Ever. That's not even a discussion.
2012-09-18 02:51:34 PM  
2 votes:

genepool lifeboat: skullkrusher: "I felt like I was making too much money"... wow, dude.

That was about as far as I got and closed the tab.


then you missed the part where he burned a tax collection notice biatched about tapping his 401k to help his sick father.
2012-09-18 02:49:42 PM  
2 votes:

skullkrusher: I thought Mother Jones was a progressive paper? Why is it trying to make occupiers look like exactly the opposite of righteous, everyman fed up with corporatism?

"I felt like I was making too much money"... wow, dude.


Maybe they felt an obligation to report the facts.
2012-09-18 02:46:40 PM  
2 votes:
Well, since two of them are lawyers, you first five idiots are just that.
2012-09-18 01:13:33 PM  
2 votes:
In that article, I learned everything I need to know about why OWS failed.
2012-09-18 06:37:10 PM  
1 votes:

RanDomino: Funny how all these farkers you never see in the Politics tab are always showing up suddenly just to bash OWS.


Given my nature, I could never enter into debate on the politics thread because I'd never get any work done.

That said, I will bash OWS for the useless, self-important act of wankery that it was. I'm a moderate who sees the evils of the right, but OWS was never (and will never be) the answer.
2012-09-18 06:33:13 PM  
1 votes:
Funny how all these farkers you never see in the Politics tab are always showing up suddenly just to bash OWS.
2012-09-18 06:22:45 PM  
1 votes:

MattyFridays: skullkrusher: I thought Mother Jones was a progressive paper? Why is it trying to make occupiers look like exactly the opposite of righteous, everyman fed up with corporatism?

"I felt like I was making too much money"... wow, dude.

Although the first part of the quote is stupid, the second part - "and I wasn't happy" speaks volumes.

You can take any job in the world, but if you're not happy with it, you're going to be miserable. Doesn't matter how much money you make.

I was in a job for five years in which I was miserable but I was making good money. I actually took a job that paid less than what I was making (it wasn't a huge financial cut, but it was sizable in relation to benefits) for happiness.


"took [another] job," not "quit." big difference.
2012-09-18 05:47:58 PM  
1 votes:
Why can't anyone see that taking a persons property (rundown house) and doing anything with it (gutting it so a homeless family can move in) is stealing? It's not yours douchebag! Leave it alone!

"But, but... it's empty and I know a homeless family that could use it."

Is it yours to give/repair/squat in? No, so leave it alone.
2012-09-18 05:21:14 PM  
1 votes:
Ishkur
Economically: Money (or lack thereof) is a powerful motivator and it makes everything move faster, better, and with a purpose. Most of OWS hated money and Capitalism and it failed to understand that the system is not going away and the only way to change the system is to use money to influence it (and no, this is not a contradiction). Capitalism is not the problem. Capitalism itself has no ethical or moral value -- it is just a tool, like a hammer, and like any hammer you can use it to build a house or bash someone's skull in. There's nothing sinful about making money and using that money to further your private and public ventures. That's what all rich people do. That's what OWS didn't.

Economic power is not just about money, just as "economics" does not just mean "capitalism". "The economy" is just the aggregate of the production and distribution of goods and services. When something is produced, distributed, and consumed, that is economic activity. Selling anything is obviously economic activity, but so is eating food from your own garden, or living in a house. IMO the logical next step (if not first step) for Occupy was always building/housing liberation, or squatting if you like (although - true story - you don't have to be an unwashed heroin addict to do it). So it makes sense that probably the most effective, longest-lasting, and largest-scale activity of Occupy post-encampments has been along the lines of "Occupy Homes" (or whatever it's called in different places). Get people's needs met, and they'll support you.
2012-09-18 04:36:35 PM  
1 votes:

WTFDYW: OldManDownDRoad: Back in the late 60s and early 70s, my family had several groups of people approach us about living in the several old houses that were in various states of decay around our farm....

That is one of the coolest stories I have read on FARK.


Agreed.
2012-09-18 04:24:46 PM  
1 votes:
Those 5 represented some of the 1% of the good OWS protestors. The remaining 99% were the junkies, rapists, and thieves.
2012-09-18 04:11:24 PM  
1 votes:

DaddyRat: Xcott: MattyFridays: More fun quotes from the article:

"I hate New York..." "It's becoming a cop state..." "Where else are we gonna go?"

Uh, I don't know, maybe someplace where the cost of living isn't stratospheric and construction jobs are plentiful like North Carolina?

You can't do that. In Brooklyn, you can be a funemployed kidult with a kickstarter plan for selling artisanal pickles from the back of your recumbent penny farthing. Try that in North Carolina, and you'll just be taken for a bum.

Or a Yankee. 


Or one of the thousands of people who came here only to discover that the jobless rate is 9.6% and the construction industry is composed almost entirely of guys from Mexico or Guatemala who are willing to work as trades for as little as $13 an hour.
2012-09-18 03:55:44 PM  
1 votes:

MattyFridays: More fun quotes from the article:

"I hate New York..." "It's becoming a cop state..." "Where else are we gonna go?"

Uh, I don't know, maybe someplace where the cost of living isn't stratospheric and construction jobs are plentiful like North Carolina?


You can't do that. In Brooklyn, you can be a funemployed kidult with a kickstarter plan for selling artisanal pickles from the back of your recumbent penny farthing. Try that in North Carolina, and you'll just be taken for a bum.
2012-09-18 03:46:11 PM  
1 votes:

kattana: Daniel Zeta is the son of a Minnesota corn farmer who has long believed that industrial agriculture-and modern society in general-is destined to collapse

later..

In the early spring, he returned to his family farm and planted 22 acres of organic barley

so.. he is returning to that "thing" that he knows is destined to fail?

riight..


If he's got a local brewery, he can sell that barley pretty easily. If he can do his own malting/drying, he could actually make a profit.

However, to handle 22 acres he's going to need a tractor and a few other items, none of which will be cheap.

Or he can always hire a few Mexicans.
2012-09-18 03:28:11 PM  
1 votes:

Igor Jakovsky: skullkrusher: MattyFridays: Although the first part of the quote is stupid, the second part - "and I wasn't happy" speaks volumes.

absolutely. I left a great paying job at CSFB (6 figures at age 25 in 2000) because I was miserable with the business and the soul numbing nature of having to sort through the lies my own company was telling to help my clients make money. Making "too much money" wasn't the problem.

The big difference is, I imagine you had another job lined up and kept on working and making a living. You didn't go on an extended camping trip in a major city whilst going broke. The worst part is that he was taking care of his sick father with those 70k bonuses and now he's biatching because he's gone into debt.


left to manage the family business for 4 years before realizing that bagelry just wasn't for me as a career.
2012-09-18 03:21:08 PM  
1 votes:
Of course OWS failed. They did not bring enough guillotines.

images49.fotki.com
2012-09-18 03:12:59 PM  
1 votes:

skullkrusher [TotalFark]
2012-09-18 02:46:10 PM

I thought Mother Jones was a progressive paper? Why is it trying to make occupiers look like exactly the opposite of righteous, everyman fed up with corporatism?

"I felt like I was making too much money"... wow, dude.

It's the paper's fault he said that?
2012-09-18 03:01:06 PM  
1 votes:
More fun quotes from the article:

"I hate New York..." "It's becoming a cop state..." "Where else are we gonna go?"

Uh, I don't know, maybe someplace where the cost of living isn't stratospheric and construction jobs are plentiful like North Carolina?
2012-09-18 02:56:25 PM  
1 votes:

Mock26: The Occupiers will end up just like the Hippies. Some of them will continue to live up to the ideals that they are espousing, but most of them will melt back into mainstream America.


one of the old dudes at work kept up with all his hippy friends from the 70's. Two lawyers and a judge, and assorted other businessmen. Pretty funny.
2012-09-18 02:55:12 PM  
1 votes:
I don't care.
2012-09-18 02:54:54 PM  
1 votes:

ModernLuddite: This is why America has no left: the "movement" is composed of individualists who can't abandon their own extreme myopia in favor of building this utopia.


Like the farmer who criticizes cities. No one is going to get on board with abandoning cities. Ever. That's not even a discussion.


Yeah, it was especially ironic considering the anti-city guy moved to New York and then to San Francisco.
2012-09-18 02:48:09 PM  
1 votes:
99% of the OWS is probably still asleep right this moment.
2012-09-18 02:43:21 PM  
1 votes:
I did not RTFA, but let me guess...

uppermidwestgourmet.com
 
Displayed 35 of 35 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report