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(Wimp) Video The video is entitled, "The Birth of a Tool". Farkers will be surprised to learn that this is NOT a home movie of the day Drew was born   (wimp.com) divider line 25
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3124 clicks; posted to Video » on 17 Sep 2012 at 10:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-17 10:12:41 PM
Why link to wimp? The HD original on Vimeo.
 
2012-09-17 10:16:02 PM
Beautiful.
 
2012-09-17 10:33:16 PM
I liked the idea of using the hardy to split the kindling.
 
2012-09-17 10:54:32 PM
Man, that guy really had an axe to grind
 
2012-09-17 10:54:44 PM
totally whack, should log that link from FiaB.
 
2012-09-17 11:03:45 PM

Fish in a Barrel: Why link to wimp? The HD original on Vimeo.


cuz vimeo sucks, and nobody really cares.
 
2012-09-17 11:09:45 PM
He should 8x8 on a boat during power hour.
 
2012-09-17 11:41:16 PM
Congratulations, you just spent 2 days making an axe. It's great work if you can get it, and more importantly, if someone will pay you to do it. Otherwise, it's just not practical these days.

I just spent most of last week watching traditional craftsmen working at a variety of locations. I saw some really talented blacksmiths, coopers, glass blowers, etc, but I wondered how they're able to support themselves. I'm busting my ass as an engineer and my family is barely getting by. Maybe I'm in the wrong business.
 
2012-09-18 12:18:36 AM

SwingDancer: Fish in a Barrel: Why link to wimp? The HD original on Vimeo.

cuz vimeo sucks, and nobody really cares.


I care, because wimp picks up the views/impressions of the original video for their own gain. Instead, it should embed from youtube, vimeo, etc.
 
2012-09-18 12:20:11 AM

Marshall Willenholly: Congratulations, you just spent 2 days making an axe. It's great work if you can get it, and more importantly, if someone will pay you to do it. Otherwise, it's just not practical these days.

I just spent most of last week watching traditional craftsmen working at a variety of locations. I saw some really talented blacksmiths, coopers, glass blowers, etc, but I wondered how they're able to support themselves. I'm busting my ass as an engineer and my family is barely getting by. Maybe I'm in the wrong business.


Check his site. They've so many orders, they've had to stop taking them and he has two others working with him.

I don't think he's getting rich, but he's obviously supporting his family and two others.
 
2012-09-18 01:01:07 AM
I'd have liked to see the initial work on those metal billets.
 
2012-09-18 07:04:07 AM
today, on how it's made.. 1886
veganismisthefuture.com

Barrels...
belt buckles
horshoes
And axes

And the cost of that ax? $229.. Walmart aint such a bad place, IS IT?!
 
2012-09-18 07:07:01 AM
You know what a hatchet is right?
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-09-18 07:48:41 AM

toyotaboy: You know what a hatchet is right?
[2.bp.blogspot.com image 400x293]



Oooh... No. I'm an AXE murderer...
a1.ec-images.myspacecdn.com
 
2012-09-18 08:13:31 AM

Marshall Willenholly: I just spent most of last week watching traditional craftsmen working at a variety of locations. I saw some really talented blacksmiths, coopers, glass blowers, etc, but I wondered how they're able to support themselves. I'm busting my ass as an engineer and my family is barely getting by. Maybe I'm in the wrong business.


Some of them are machinists by trade I am sure. One trade that *is* in high demand is scientific glass blowers. Chemistry departments and research labs rely on a lot of custom equipment, and having a glassblower nearby who knows how to make it is *very* useful, but they are few and far between.
 
2012-09-18 09:43:21 AM
Does everything have to be filmed like the end-sequence of House? How about a video explaining what he's doing? What's the wedge he puts in the end of the ax head? How hot does it have to be? What's the magic dust he sprinkles on it? I know some of these things, but I'd like to know more. Yeah, it's beautiful, but it's beautiful to see a true craftsman at work. It doesn't also need to be a vehicle for crappy guitar & falsetto indie music.
 
2012-09-18 10:14:35 AM
What's the magic dust he sprinkles on it?

Was wondering the same thing myself. However, your complaint about not being told what he's doing is indicative of the time we live in. How 'bout, if you're curious, do some research on your own?

Just a thought...
 
2012-09-18 10:28:38 AM

darch: What's the magic dust he sprinkles on it?

Was wondering the same thing myself. However, your complaint about not being told what he's doing is indicative of the time we live in. How 'bout, if you're curious, do some research on your own?

Just a thought...


Borax
 
2012-09-18 10:53:33 AM

RobotSpider: Does everything have to be filmed like the end-sequence of House? How about a video explaining what he's doing? What's the wedge he puts in the end of the ax head? How hot does it have to be? What's the magic dust he sprinkles on it? I know some of these things, but I'd like to know more. Yeah, it's beautiful, but it's beautiful to see a true craftsman at work. It doesn't also need to be a vehicle for crappy guitar & falsetto indie music.


At the risk of being whiny (I know, too late), I have to reluctanly agree. It was a bit artsy for my taste. That's an aesthetic view, so irrelevant in itself, but if the tradeoff is this, then I have to say I'm a little disappointed. It's beautiful, I won't dispute that, but it seems a lot of style over substance. We get to see the man make the axe, but we really don't come away knowing much more about it than we did before, and I think at least for people interested in this kind of content, most of us probably would.
 
2012-09-18 11:08:41 AM

FarkinCyclop: SwingDancer: Fish in a Barrel: Why link to wimp? The HD original on Vimeo.

cuz vimeo sucks, and nobody really cares.

I care, because wimp picks up the views/impressions of the original video for their own gain. Instead, it should embed from youtube, vimeo, etc.


and this hurts you how?
 
2012-09-18 04:11:23 PM
I, for one, am glad to see this kind of thing still exists - That there are people in this world who perform a real Craft.

Now, I realize that I'm not omniscient, and thus cannot see the world as a whole, but from my vantage point, true craftsmanship is becoming increasingly rare as we become more dependent on our machines and technology.

The days of "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times" etc.. are giving way to "lol C U in a hour" - I blame Twitter and cell phones.

Want an axe, hammer, drill, shed, etc...? run down to Walmart or Lowes and buy one that was machined in a giant factory in China.

-----------------------------

Videos like this at least restore some faith I have in the possibility that our society - hell, our world - might NOT end up an ironic homage to 'Idiocracy'
 
2012-09-18 10:53:06 PM
Link

More hammer sounds, different class of tool as far as quality is concerned, but it shows the process a bit more.
 
2012-09-19 11:05:37 AM

SirTanon: I, for one, am glad to see this kind of thing still exists - That there are people in this world who perform a real Craft.

Now, I realize that I'm not omniscient, and thus cannot see the world as a whole, but from my vantage point, true craftsmanship is becoming increasingly rare as we become more dependent on our machines and technology.

The days of "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times" etc.. are giving way to "lol C U in a hour" - I blame Twitter and cell phones.

Want an axe, hammer, drill, shed, etc...? run down to Walmart or Lowes and buy one that was machined in a giant factory in China.

-----------------------------

Videos like this at least restore some faith I have in the possibility that our society - hell, our world - might NOT end up an ironic homage to 'Idiocracy'


This is good enough to score, but I've a funny feeling you mean it.

Most of the developed world gets stuff from China now, not just us. But the knowledge and skills to make hand tools is pretty much universal; it's just that people don't want to pay for it. So it's not like it's dying out, either. It might surprise you to learn that this complaint has been around, in some for another, for hundreds of years. It's not without some basis, but I don't think we're headed into a near future where no one knows how to may anything anymore. I would rather say that true craftsmanship is getting less ubiquitous: In my father's day, every town had someone like this, usually several.

Your second statement is well-meaning, I'm sure, but mistaken and misplaced. No one in Victorian England ever uttered a statement in normal conversation remotely like the first setence of a Dickens novel. Writing was a high form of the day, not representative of normal conversation. Likewise, people today do not speak the same way they text. (Or if they do, we can't tell the difference, since "C U" sounds exactly the same as "see you;" after all, the text is abbreviations of normal speech, done because hammering away at tiny keys is kind of a PITA.

I'm a fan of hard science fiction, and 'Idiocracy' actually makes very little sense at all. The future society of morans it depicts could not rationally exist, because a society consisting entirely of stupid people would be unable to build anything useful, even very badly. There would be no scanners or automatic anything, no cars of any kind, or any reasonable organisation to anything. The society it actually depicts has more in common with the dichotomous Morlock/Eloi social structure of H.G. Wells' 'The Time Machine,' in which the more technically sophisticated Morlocks preyed on the cowlike Eloi. In 'Idocracy,' we see only the Eloi, never the Morlocks, but they must exist in order for all that other stuff to exist. I don't believe the filmmakers actually supposed that, though, and that's why the film makes no sense. The President is just as much of a dumbass as everyone else, so there are apparently none of the smart people who would have to exist. My point is that we can't achieve that state. If people really did get that dumb on a very large scale, then society as we know it would simply collapse, since it relies on a certain minimum proportion of smart and grown-up people who know how to do useful stuff.

More likely is some version of the Morlock/Eloi structure, and in fact a lot of human history has been like that: small numbers of shrewd people living off the efforts of much greater masses of less sophisticated people, who are partly in that position because of one of the film's valid points, that idiocy (or at least ignorance) tends to be self-enforcing: ignorant people tend to make choices that reinforce their original ignorance, rather than ones that would help them know more and understand better in order to make better choices, because they literally don't know better. And scientific studies have shown that ignorance is also unaware of itself: ignorant people don't know and largely refuse to accept that they're ignorant, and this seems, rather cruelly, to be the main thing that keeps ignorant people that way. They're not unintelligent: an ignorant person can be intellectually genius, though it's unlikely because genius also tend to be inquisitive; but plenty of very smart people are also very ignorant -- and don't know it. Oddly, all but the dumbest and smartest people seem to have some sense of their own intelligence; but it appears that ignorance tends to be ignorant of itself.

Though the best techniques for making one are a learned trade, the fundamental principles of an axe are obvious to anyone. So it's not likely we'll forget how to make them, as long as we're able to reason at all. Even iron production is pretty basic and very widely understood. But I do agree that true craftsmanship is its own valuable resource, and worth preserving.
 
2012-09-19 05:15:17 PM
magic dust is probably borax or boric acid, it is used as firecoat to keep air from getting at the metal.
the wedge,i believe is because he uses one kind of steel for the edge and one for the head. He cuts the wedge place the edge steel in it then forges the head and edge together with the hammer.
 
2012-09-19 05:23:16 PM
Idiocracy is based on a story by C.M. Kornbluth entitled "the marching morons".
The basis of the story was that a smaller and smaller percentage of intelligent people were supporting the world and its technologies for the benefit of a larger and larger pool of morons.As an aside Kornbluth's cynical and satirical writing has always been a favor. And most of his stories and novels use hyperbole to make a point.
 
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