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(Christian Science Monitor)   Russia declassifies information regarding a diamond meteorite impact located in the 70s. In other news, there are asteroids made out of diamond   (csmonitor.com) divider line 59
    More: Interesting, Russia, Post-Soviet states  
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16093 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Sep 2012 at 4:09 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-09-17 03:43:55 PM
7 votes:
According to the official news agency, ITAR-Tass, the diamonds at Popigai are "twice as hard" as the usual gemstones

I'm calling shenanigans. There is only one fundamental diamond structure, so if these are diamonds, they're the exact same hardness as every other diamond in the world.
2012-09-17 05:12:17 PM
5 votes:
Most gemstone quality diamonds found on Earth are found in Kimberlite pipes (or the beds of streams that have eroded such deposits). They are believed to form in the Earth under great pressure and heat. The Kimberlite pipe is the throat of an old volcano and the diamonds, plus the clay in which they are found, come from deep in the Earth.

The diamond found in meteorites have (at least until now) been very small diamonds formed in stars. Small stars like our Suns start "burning" Hydrogen, forming Helium, as they age they switch to making heavier elements by "burning" Helium. Carbon is one of the elements that is made in small dwarf stars like our Sun. The heaviest element formed by this type of star is Iron.

Astronomers have concluded that some small stars, when they collapse are composed almost entirely of carbon, which because of heat and pressure, makes them giant diamonds. When they explode, they scatter diamonds through space.

If the Russian story is true and the Russians are correct about possing a large meteorite impact, it is composed of vasts amounts of space diamonds. Many of these are probably industrial grade--very small and impure, not gemstone quality but good for industrial grinding and blades.

Russian diamonds have long been plentiful but of relatively lower quality, so it's possible they have some space diamonds in the mix already.

If this is so, I would expect that the Russians would be able to undercut the cost of industrial grade and small gemstone diamonds at the expense of other producers such as South Africa and Canada, which are mining Kimberlite pipes for gemstones. If a small percentage of these trillions of carats of diamonds are gemstones of good size and quality, they could crash the cartel that is led by DeBeers.

They have no real interest in doing so, though, so I can't see why they would announce the real source of their diamonds. They should stock-pile and manipulate the price just like the DeBeers cartel.

On the other hand, if they do release a lot of diamonds, flooding the market because they need the money, it means that industrial grade diamond prices will plummet, gemstone prices will fall, and the only diamonds that will hold much of their value will be historical stones associated with famous people, such as Marie Antoinette, or with famous jewels, such as Liz Taylor's diamond ring and the Crown Jewels of Great Britain.

Historical stones have a known provenance and are guaranteed not to be space diamonds (which are not rare) or artificial diamonds (which can be very nice to look at, but are cheaper to make than to find).

Expect blades to be sharper and polishing dies to be more sparkly if the Russians are not lying or the news story is not BS.

Also, now might be a good time for coloured stones such as emeralds, rubies and sapphires to make a come-back as wedding ring settings. They are more costly than diamonds any way, and they are not as easy to make, nor is there a giant cartel sitting on God only knows how many tonnes of them.

If things keep moving in this direction, gemstones will mostly become much cheaper over time. You might want to consider pearls--not the cheap cultured pearls, but the real thing. Our oceans are a mess. Pearls may hold their value better than other mineral deposits because they come from living organisms, and unlike diamonds, you can't make pearl oysters. Not yet, at any rate.

As for oil in meteorites, not likely. "Real" diamonds, which is to say gemstone diamonds, do form deep in the Earth, while space diamonds form in stars. Oil is unlike to form in stars because it is largely organic in origin. Of course, some geologists (notably Russian geologists) and Thomas Gold, have claimed that oil is formed inorganically in vast quantities and that the reason why they have found it in meteor impact craters is that it is formed deeper in the Earth than the deposits of organic fossil fuels such as coal and bitumin.

This is probably crank-science, so oil from non-biological processes is unlikely, at least until somebody proves Gold right.

The conventional geologists claim the oil is found in fractured rock simply because it seeps into the cracks from the normal layers which contain ancient seabeds.

By the by, oil is not made from dinosaurs.That is advertising. Oil is made by bacteria, so some of it may be made more recently than the bulk of it, which was formed millions of years ago and buried by sediment and volcanic ash and lava.

If Gold is right, of course, there's so much more oil and natural gas (non-biological) down there to be found, we are doomed to even worse climate change than if we used up all the normal bio-fuel in the form of fossil deposits. If bacteria make oil, there's not a lot of it and it isn't necessarily all that deep. If geology makes oil and it seeps up into porous rocks and cracks, it could be anywhere, everywhere and very deep but very plentiful.

Which is better? Personally I hope the biological theory is right. We can't take much more of this fossil sunlight being released into our air, water and soil without being broiled.
2012-09-17 05:03:29 PM
4 votes:
You burned up on re-entry,
Impacted Siberia,
Blown on the steel breeze.
Come on you asteroid, you piece of hard carbon, come on you meteor, you space dust and fragment, and shine.
userserve-ak.last.fm
2012-09-17 05:41:18 PM
3 votes:
What "space diamonds" may be used for:

images4.wikia.nocookie.net

/No rudimentary lathe required
//Merciful, and quick
2012-09-17 04:56:08 PM
3 votes:

wildcardjack: [ars.sciencedirect.com image 705x803]

First up, asteroids often have micro-diamonds. It's a stable form of carbon.

Second, didn't an asteroid impact make that diamond mine / tourist trap in Arkansas?

Third, the supply of diamonds might be rigged, but the supply of talent for cutting stones is even more restricted. If you could fully automate the cut and finish of diamonds to the "press button" level you'd be burned alive by the people in the NYC diamond district.


Stone cutters are 8 year old Indian girls making $2 a day. They have machine cut diamonds as well although somebody will come along and tell me that a person who can't tell the difference between silver and steel somehow automatically becomes an exquisite diamond inspector when their friends are getting married.
2012-09-17 04:55:58 PM
3 votes:
APPROVES

upload.wikimedia.org
2012-09-17 03:55:08 PM
3 votes:

Marcus Aurelius: xynix: "The Russians say most such diamonds found in the past have been "space diamonds" of extraterrestrial origin found in meteor craters."

Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?

Also does this mean there could be oil in asteroids? "Fossil Fuel" to me means no fossil (bio) no fuel but can it come from any old carbon?

Stars can create diamond. I'm not sure they'd survive an exploding star, though.


Fun fact, all gold is made from exploding stars and survives fine. Stars can create diamonds but so can other hard-mass objects. If you had a rock planet surrounding a star that exploded then pieces of that planet can be flung out into space and create asteroids with diamonds formed from the planet, same could be said of protoplanets that are later destroyed or rip apart.

Also Fossil Fuel is created FROM organic material, if you didn't have dead organisms first you didn't have fossil fuel. Read up please at wiki Link.
2012-09-17 03:34:04 PM
3 votes:
Russia has just declassified news that will shake world gem markets to their core: the discovery of a vast new diamond field containing "trillions of carats," enough to supply global markets for another 3,000 years.

I thought the diamond mine companies just keep most of the diamonds off the market to keep prices high not that they are actually rare? or is that just a conspiracy theory?
2012-09-17 06:13:36 PM
2 votes:
What we need is a few asteroids made out of copper right now.
2012-09-17 05:31:03 PM
2 votes:
Jesus guys, they clearly meant formation under the impact point from the pressures of that impact, not from the asteroid ITSELF!
2012-09-17 04:49:50 PM
2 votes:

Swoop1809: abfalter: On a side note anyone who buys a diamond is wasting their money.

These are less than half the price of a diamond, are over 90% as hard, and almost indistinguishable from a real diamond.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moissanite

I'm going to buy my girlfriend some Moissanite earrings to float the possibility of a Moissanite engagement ring rather than diamond.

She wants a traditional diamond mostly because she doesn't want to explain to her girlfriends why she doesn't have one. I'm hoping she will be dazzled by the extra fire in Moissanite.

If not she's getting a lab diamond


My wife has a moissanite ring. She tells everyone it's diamond, how many jewelers do we hang out with? none. Either way, she wanted the clear gem, not a zirconia, and thought diamond prices were stupid compared to what we could put towards the honeymoon.
2012-09-17 04:48:57 PM
2 votes:
The glut of Russian diamonds has been known for years, hence the invention of "tennis bracelets". This new revelation just makes them even more worthless.

I told my girlfriend I was way too pragmatic and cheap to buy her diamonds, so if that was a problem, she'd better leave.

She stuck around--married 21 years now. Not a single diamond has been purchased with my money.
2012-09-17 04:25:15 PM
2 votes:

JPSimonetti: skullkrusher: except by a jeweler employed by your wife to see if you're a cheap farker or not.

Any woman worth marrying really wouldn't care, except that you lied about it in the beginning.

/flame-suit-ACTIVATE


If the survival of the relationship hinges on a pretty but pointless and expensive rock, maybe the girl is pretty but pointless and expensive as well.
2012-09-17 04:24:26 PM
2 votes:
The biggest ever diamond has been found floating in space. The gem, estimated at close to 10 billion trillion trillion carats, is at the core of a dead star (BPM 37093) - a crystallised white dwarf.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/02/18/moonsized_diamond_found_in_sp a ce/
2012-09-17 04:24:01 PM
2 votes:

cman: Considering that diamond is a natural occurrence, why is anyone surprised that it would show up on places other than earth?


Earth exceptionalism lots of people look a the conditions we evolved in, and then are shocked that if the conditions were different, they wouldn't be at all conducive to the type of life we are. Like all the 'omg, if gravity wasn't exactly the strength it is, then all the things affected by gravity would be different! doesn't that show how awesome god and earth are!'
2012-09-17 04:23:45 PM
2 votes:

skullkrusher: except by a jeweler employed by your wife to see if you're a cheap farker or not.


Any woman worth marrying really wouldn't care, except that you lied about it in the beginning.

/flame-suit-ACTIVATE
2012-09-17 04:18:45 PM
2 votes:

mauricecano: Marcus Aurelius: xynix: "The Russians say most such diamonds found in the past have been "space diamonds" of extraterrestrial origin found in meteor craters."

Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?


There's a class of asteroids called carbonaceous (as opposed to nickel-iron). The asteroids themselves are made of carbon. The heat and pressure of the impact converts it to diamond.

Stars can create diamond. I'm not sure they'd survive an exploding star, though.

Fun fact, all gold is made from exploding stars and survives fine. Stars can create diamonds but so can other hard-mass objects. If you had a rock planet surrounding a star that exploded then pieces of that planet can be flung out into space and create asteroids with diamonds formed from the planet, same could be said of protoplanets that are later destroyed or rip apart.


Gold (and everything else between iron and uranium) is created when a star goes supernova.
Gold is an element. Diamond is a molecule. Molecules are much, much easier to rip apart than atoms. Gold in a star becomes gold plasma. A diamond in a star becomes carbon plasma.

You might get individual carbon atoms condensing out of the supernova stew as diamond. I don't know that for sure, possibly an astronomer can set me straight.

Me not have coherent grammar today for some reason.
GBB
2012-09-17 04:16:59 PM
2 votes:

Marcus Aurelius: According to the official news agency, ITAR-Tass, the diamonds at Popigai are "twice as hard" as the usual gemstones

I'm calling shenanigans. There is only one fundamental diamond structure, so if these are diamonds, they're the exact same hardness as every other diamond in the world.


All sorts of shenanigans on this story.
1) If they knew about this back in the 70s, then at some point they knew they could have exploited it to help them finance... everything. But, they went bankrupt instead??
2) If these things are twice as hard as diamonds, they could be something else entirely.

Looking at 2 and taking into consideration 1, equals massive amounts of BS.
2012-09-17 04:16:29 PM
2 votes:
On a side note anyone who buys a diamond is wasting their money.

These are less than half the price of a diamond, are over 90% as hard, and almost indistinguishable from a real diamond.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moissanite
2012-09-17 04:15:08 PM
2 votes:

Marcus Aurelius: According to the official news agency, ITAR-Tass, the diamonds at Popigai are "twice as hard" as the usual gemstones

I'm calling shenanigans. There is only one fundamental diamond structure, so if these are diamonds, they're the exact same hardness as every other diamond in the world.


Depends on the type, amount, and dispersion of impurities in the lattice.
2012-09-17 03:40:47 PM
2 votes:

Headso: I thought the diamond mine companies just keep most of the diamonds off the market to keep prices high not that they are actually rare? or is that just a conspiracy theory?


Yes and no. They are rare, but DeBeers restricts the supply even further and jacks up the price.
2012-09-17 08:21:08 PM
1 votes:

ChuDogg: Not sure about your story but the whole "blood diamond" scare itself effectively limited the distribution of diamonds through 'official' channels at exactly the same time DeBeers was loosing their grips on the monopoly. Coincidence?


Not exactly a scare, it was made to appeal to the dumbasses that drink fair trade coffee and believe in organic water. Plus it took the heat off of them for the way they treat their workers. I'd like to know what they paid to get that Leonardo Dicaprio movie made to help push the idea that they were the only legitimate source of African diamonds. I have no doubt De Beers isn't above buying blood diamonds and selling them as South African.

But there always has to be an angle and their angle is probably going to be selling gem quality diamonds from this never before mined source and for all anybody knows they could be straight up selling AKs and RPGs for diamonds and cutting out the middle man and then claiming they're from this fantastic new Russian mine so people won't be suspicious regarding their possible African origin.
2012-09-17 08:19:03 PM
1 votes:

Marcus Aurelius: According to the official news agency, ITAR-Tass, the diamonds at Popigai are "twice as hard" as the usual gemstones

I'm calling shenanigans. There is only one fundamental diamond structure, so if these are diamonds, they're the exact same hardness as every other diamond in the world.


http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aggrega ted_diamond_nanorod
Diamond hardness varies widely, due to impurities and imperfections, such as other forms of carbon a "perfect" diamond will always have the same hardness but true perfection is rare in nature.
2012-09-17 07:52:07 PM
1 votes:
Total semantics. Most "diamonds" mined in the world are black diamonds, which don't have a very high value, but are used extensively in industrial processes and whatnot. That's what these "crater diamonds" are.
2012-09-17 07:39:52 PM
1 votes:

OscarTamerz: Maybe they've come up with a new or faster diamond synthesis method and need a cover story to sell it as a "natural" diamond since artificial diamonds have to be labelled in the U.S.

The same thing happened with the blood diamonds. There was a BS story published in Readers Digest about some WWII vet who took a haul of diamonds off some SS officers they killed and buried them in a trench and in the intervening decades didn't go back to Europe to recover these millions of dollars worth of diamonds and didn't have a good reason for not doing so but finally in his 80s he decides to go back and dig them up and miraculously finds the same trench he was in when he buried them. It was an obvious cover story for the diamonds which were blood diamonds and the sellers wanted to say they were clean and not bought illegally from whatever rebel army they got them from. The whole thing was in the vein of Saving Private Ryan or Band of Brothers. Somebody flipped the folks at Readers Digest a couple of coins and it was all good given that they're not exactly known for their hard hitting investigative journalism.


Not sure about your story but the whole "blood diamond" scare itself effectively limited the distribution of diamonds through 'official' channels at exactly the same time DeBeers was loosing their grips on the monopoly. Coincidence? .
2012-09-17 07:13:59 PM
1 votes:
Diamond shovels for everyone!

media-mcw.cursecdn.com
2012-09-17 06:48:02 PM
1 votes:

ChopperCharles: "Fossil fuel" is anything but. Petroleum is abiotic in origin, it comes from deep within the earth, where hydrocarbons are put under immense pressure. Oil is GEOLOGIC, and thus is likely an infinitely renewable resource. Ask any geologist. The "crushed up dinosaurs" origin of oil is only believed in the West, and it is propaganda at its finest.

"The suggestion that petroleum might have arisen from some transformation of squashed fish or biological detritus is surely the silliest notion to have been entertained by substantial numbers of persons over an extended period of time." -- Fred Hoyle, (1982)

Read up friends:

http://ergobalance.blogspot.com/2008/03/oil-not-fossil-fuel.html

Charles


Oh, a blogspot blog... much more trusted source of information than Ivy League physicists with PhDs.

/not reading it, because Dr. Gene Ray
//recognize the fallacy, still don't care
2012-09-17 06:34:39 PM
1 votes:

xynix: Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?


Also, it may be worth pointing out that some asteroids may once have been part of larger planetary bodies that got smashed to pieces. For example the earth got hit by something the size of present day Mars. So much molten material was ejected that the moon formed from it. What is now Mars was also hit by something almost equal in size, throwing out massive amounts of molten stuff. I'm not saying the moon has diamonds. It's just an example that some pieces of dead looking rock floating around may have had a very interesting and violent history as once part of a planet sized object..
2012-09-17 06:31:23 PM
1 votes:
Ahem - nobody will want these, for jewelry as they're a bit more radioactive than your typical Russian diamond.

The resultant hardness of the varying allotropes they've found, on the other hand, makes for some good industrial use, like concrete and metal cutting.

Doubtful it will be good for optical stuff as other radiation sources tend to screw with photon travel.
2012-09-17 06:11:39 PM
1 votes:
Maybe they've come up with a new or faster diamond synthesis method and need a cover story to sell it as a "natural" diamond since artificial diamonds have to be labelled in the U.S.

The same thing happened with the blood diamonds. There was a BS story published in Readers Digest about some WWII vet who took a haul of diamonds off some SS officers they killed and buried them in a trench and in the intervening decades didn't go back to Europe to recover these millions of dollars worth of diamonds and didn't have a good reason for not doing so but finally in his 80s he decides to go back and dig them up and miraculously finds the same trench he was in when he buried them. It was an obvious cover story for the diamonds which were blood diamonds and the sellers wanted to say they were clean and not bought illegally from whatever rebel army they got them from. The whole thing was in the vein of Saving Private Ryan or Band of Brothers. Somebody flipped the folks at Readers Digest a couple of coins and it was all good given that they're not exactly known for their hard hitting investigative journalism.
2012-09-17 05:49:38 PM
1 votes:
Looks like Wikipedia agrees with the brantgoose, not golddude

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kimberlite

I guess golddude's geology professor needs some continuing education?
2012-09-17 05:38:39 PM
1 votes:
Still quite happy with the relative rarity of the ring I designed for my wife: 1/3c of Extraterrestrial Peridot (aka Palladot(tm) or Pallasitic Olivene, or "Peridot that was in a meteorite from outer-friggen-space")

ET Peridot almost NEVER makes it through the atmosphere intact (or at least un-fractured enough to survive gem cutting). There are like 1 or 2 falls in the entire world known to yield gem-quality stones.

Diamonds-shmiamonds, my wife wears a friggen space gem. Love ya, babe.
2012-09-17 05:15:55 PM
1 votes:

durbnpoisn: I'm afraid you missed a very important part of TFA. It's not the content of the meteor itself, it's assumed that the meteor hits a bed of near solid graphite (which is carbon), and forces the molecules tightly together with the immense heat and pressure.
This is how diamonds are formed naturally on earth too, but it's volcanoes that do the handy work.


Wow your knowledge of the formation of diamonds is very impressive. That's not what my geology profs told me about kimberlite deposits. You must get out there and share your theories which are no less believable than these Russian claims.
2012-09-17 05:09:51 PM
1 votes:
Diamonds only form at high pressures so you need over 1 million psi to grow one and then it takes weeks. Normally it takes billions of years miles below the surface of the earth. If you have a high temperature of 1700o C or so without the high pressure they degrade back to carbon. There is no way to make a diamond "twice as hard" because the crystal structure is constant. If you had diamonds formed by an impact and they didn't degrade because of the heat then they'd be microscopic because of the short growing times. They might have trillions of carats but they'd all be smaller than sand grains. It's pretty hard to believe any of this is real.
2012-09-17 05:03:44 PM
1 votes:
wiki.rainbowbrite.co.uk

/seen racing to the scene
2012-09-17 04:56:16 PM
1 votes:

Swoop1809: abfalter: On a side note anyone who buys a diamond is wasting their money.

These are less than half the price of a diamond, are over 90% as hard, and almost indistinguishable from a real diamond.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moissanite

I'm going to buy my girlfriend some Moissanite earrings to float the possibility of a Moissanite engagement ring rather than diamond.

She wants a traditional diamond mostly because she doesn't want to explain to her girlfriends why she doesn't have one. I'm hoping she will be dazzled by the extra fire in Moissanite.

If not she's getting a lab diamond


If you end up going for a diamond, check out the antiques dealers in your area. Some of them have authentic diamond rings that have a ton of character and unique settings, and can be purchased there for a fraction of the cost as one of those peddlers who sell the off color garbage with specks in them. Only difficulty is you'd have to hire someone to verify that it's a diamond and estimate its value to make sure you're not buying something from a crackerjack box.
Sounds like trouble, but with a budget, buying diamonds is a pain in the ass no matter what - tons of studying, tons of negotiating variables, and generally the prices are overmarked about 200%. The "unique antique" route was actually easier and much, much less expensive.
2012-09-17 04:54:38 PM
1 votes:
So Lucy is in the sky with diamonds...
2012-09-17 04:51:50 PM
1 votes:

StoPPeRmobile: Women are dumb.

Shiny!


Men are dumber.

Pussy!
2012-09-17 04:48:10 PM
1 votes:
ars.sciencedirect.com

First up, asteroids often have micro-diamonds. It's a stable form of carbon.

Second, didn't an asteroid impact make that diamond mine / tourist trap in Arkansas?

Third, the supply of diamonds might be rigged, but the supply of talent for cutting stones is even more restricted. If you could fully automate the cut and finish of diamonds to the "press button" level you'd be burned alive by the people in the NYC diamond district.
2012-09-17 04:47:25 PM
1 votes:

xynix: "The Russians say most such diamonds found in the past have been "space diamonds" of extraterrestrial origin found in meteor craters."

Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?

Also does this mean there could be oil in asteroids? "Fossil Fuel" to me means no fossil (bio) no fuel but can it come from any old carbon?



I'm afraid you missed a very important part of TFA. It's not the content of the meteor itself, it's assumed that the meteor hits a bed of near solid graphite (which is carbon), and forces the molecules tightly together with the immense heat and pressure.

This is how diamonds are formed naturally on earth too, but it's volcanoes that do the handy work.
2012-09-17 04:45:24 PM
1 votes:
2012-09-17 04:39:26 PM
1 votes:
Alright, they lucked into a Crystite impact!

upload.wikimedia.org
2012-09-17 04:37:13 PM
1 votes:

Rhypskallion: I read a Tom Swift book written in 1967 about an asteroid with a core of solid sapphire... http://www.tomswift.info/homepage/cplanet.html
...which was clearly fiction. But it is a big universe, and anything may be possible.


We already know where it is.
2012-09-17 04:35:07 PM
1 votes:

Headso: Russia has just declassified news that will shake world gem markets to their core: the discovery of a vast new diamond field containing "trillions of carats," enough to supply global markets for another 3,000 years.

I thought the diamond mine companies just keep most of the diamonds off the market to keep prices high not that they are actually rare? or is that just a conspiracy theory?


Absolute, well-documented, cold, hard fact. and not "companies", but "Company" singular-as in DeBeers, a company that started life by formenting a Boer -Zulu war so they could swoop in and take over the diamond rich lands belonging to the Zulus and call them Rhodesia, and hasn't notably improved its business ethics since.

The only reason I can see for this announcement is that DeBeers check must have bounced.
2012-09-17 04:33:15 PM
1 votes:

Marcus Aurelius: xynix: "The Russians say most such diamonds found in the past have been "space diamonds" of extraterrestrial origin found in meteor craters."

Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?

Also does this mean there could be oil in asteroids? "Fossil Fuel" to me means no fossil (bio) no fuel but can it come from any old carbon?

Stars can create diamond. I'm not sure they'd survive an exploding star, though.


White dwarfs are diamonds
Link
2012-09-17 04:28:06 PM
1 votes:

trippdogg: Marcus Aurelius: According to the official news agency, ITAR-Tass, the diamonds at Popigai are "twice as hard" as the usual gemstones

I'm calling shenanigans. There is only one fundamental diamond structure, so if these are diamonds, they're the exact same hardness as every other diamond in the world.

This would normally be true, but these diamonds come with the optional travel case (a $20 value)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond#Hardness

Not all diamonds have the same hardness.
2012-09-17 04:27:05 PM
1 votes:

Bondith: mauricecano: Marcus Aurelius: xynix: "The Russians say most such diamonds found in the past have been "space diamonds" of extraterrestrial origin found in meteor craters."

Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?

There's a class of asteroids called carbonaceous (as opposed to nickel-iron). The asteroids themselves are made of carbon. The heat and pressure of the impact converts it to diamond.

Stars can create diamond. I'm not sure they'd survive an exploding star, though.

Fun fact, all gold is made from exploding stars and survives fine. Stars can create diamonds but so can other hard-mass objects. If you had a rock planet surrounding a star that exploded then pieces of that planet can be flung out into space and create asteroids with diamonds formed from the planet, same could be said of protoplanets that are later destroyed or rip apart.

Gold (and everything else between iron and uranium) is created when a star goes supernova.
Gold is an element. Diamond is a molecule. Molecules are much, much easier to rip apart than atoms. Gold in a star becomes gold plasma. A diamond in a star becomes carbon plasma.

You might get individual carbon atoms condensing out of the supernova stew as diamond. I don't know that for sure, possibly an astronomer can set me straight.

Me not have coherent grammar today for some reason.


I'm not an astronomer. From the link below:

"the team proposed that the lucent crystals formed in the atmosphere of a "red giant" or dying star before it collapsed and exploded billions of years ago. The supernova would have sent the diamond-studded material far out into space, where in the fullness of time some pieces eventually fell to Earth. If this scenario is correct, the researchers said, then interstellar dust may be peppered with tiny diamonds.

Still other diamonds are apparently created during the fiery instant when meteors and meteorites slam into Earth. In the 1960s, scientists discovered more microscopic diamonds in the remains of the vast Canyon Diablo meteorite, which formed Meteor Crater in Arizona. The diamonds are sand-grain-sized, only hundredths of an inch across. "

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/space/diamonds-in-the-sky.html
2012-09-17 04:26:24 PM
1 votes:

abfalter: On a side note anyone who buys a diamond is wasting their money.

These are less than half the price of a diamond, are over 90% as hard, and almost indistinguishable from a real diamond.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moissanite


Yes, because consumer decisions are always made based on product characteristics and logic and not because of image.
2012-09-17 04:25:09 PM
1 votes:

mauricecano: Also Fossil Fuel is created FROM organic material, if you didn't have dead organisms first you didn't have fossil fuel. Read up please at wiki Link.


Begging the question. If by "fossil fuel" you just mean "hydrocarbons", Titan would like a word.
2012-09-17 04:24:14 PM
1 votes:
I read a Tom Swift book written in 1967 about an asteroid with a core of solid sapphire... http://www.tomswift.info/homepage/cplanet.html
...which was clearly fiction. But it is a big universe, and anything may be possible.
2012-09-17 04:22:17 PM
1 votes:
Well, I believe Russia is simply trying to pawn their man-made diamonds as "space diamonds".

And we all know what Yakov said about Soviet Russia ...
2012-09-17 04:19:14 PM
1 votes:

abfalter: On a side note anyone who buys a diamond is wasting their money.

These are less than half the price of a diamond, are over 90% as hard, and almost indistinguishable from a real diamond, except by a jeweler employed by your wife to see if you're a cheap farker or not.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moissanite


:)
2012-09-17 04:18:45 PM
1 votes:

xynix: Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?

Also does this mean there could be oil in asteroids? "Fossil Fuel" to me means no fossil (bio) no fuel but can it come from any old carbon?


Geologists say that oil comes from biological matter, so no.

Scienticians say that oil is created via geological processes, so yes.

[teach_the_controversy.jpg]
2012-09-17 04:16:57 PM
1 votes:
Brokers in Belgium would be shiatting themselves if this were true. Do we have any news out of Antwerp?
2012-09-17 04:12:44 PM
1 votes:
Could someone find that picture of Superman crushing the coal into a diamond for me?

Thanks.
2012-09-17 04:09:28 PM
1 votes:
Considering that diamond is a natural occurrence, why is anyone surprised that it would show up on places other than earth?
2012-09-17 03:58:05 PM
1 votes:

xynix: "The Russians say most such diamonds found in the past have been "space diamonds" of extraterrestrial origin found in meteor craters."

Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?

Also does this mean there could be oil in asteroids? "Fossil Fuel" to me means no fossil (bio) no fuel but can it come from any old carbon?


An asteroid can just be part of a bigger thing that some other asteroid flew into and broke a chunk off of...
2012-09-17 03:46:34 PM
1 votes:

xynix: "The Russians say most such diamonds found in the past have been "space diamonds" of extraterrestrial origin found in meteor craters."

Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?

Also does this mean there could be oil in asteroids? "Fossil Fuel" to me means no fossil (bio) no fuel but can it come from any old carbon?


Stars can create diamond. I'm not sure they'd survive an exploding star, though.
2012-09-17 03:41:16 PM
1 votes:
"The Russians say most such diamonds found in the past have been "space diamonds" of extraterrestrial origin found in meteor craters."

Im no planetoligist or whatever but I had the impression diamonds were made by carbon that's squished hard. Can this happen in an asteroid? How would that much gravity exist on a small rock (even a large rock)? I can see a carbon deposit on Mars or something being turned into diamonds but on an asteroid?

Also does this mean there could be oil in asteroids? "Fossil Fuel" to me means no fossil (bio) no fuel but can it come from any old carbon?
 
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