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(Boston.com)   Instead of just taking a picture of it like most people would have done, man catches the venomous snake that bit him and carries it to wildlife officials for identification   (boston.com ) divider line
    More: Strange, holyoke, snakes, wildlife, accessibilities, Baystate Medical Center  
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5746 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Sep 2012 at 3:42 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2012-09-17 02:52:47 AM  
Here's a pic of the foolhardy adventurer:

pixhost.me
 
2012-09-17 03:52:28 AM  
stupid snake. always bitin' people and stuff. but seriously though isn't that what people was supposed to do before camera phones was so common?
 
2012-09-17 03:58:01 AM  
Stupid to do unless you have experience in handling venomous snakes, and definetly NOT recommended:
See the section about half way down under bite protocols, in fact most everything you've been taught to do is now considered wrong, no tourniquet, no suckining the venom out, etc.
Link
 
2012-09-17 03:58:45 AM  
No. Most people would have killed it, not taken a picture or caught it. Both stupid ideas. Kill it and bring in the dead carcass for a positive id.
 
2012-09-17 05:07:13 AM  
Well, bringing it with you is preferable to having to try and describe it. They can definitely tell what kind it is from it physically being there (or they can get someone who can). And it's not like you haven't already been bit. Still probably not the best option tho'.
 
2012-09-17 05:11:56 AM  

skyshooter: Stupid to do unless you have experience in handling venomous snakes, and definetly NOT recommended:
See the section about half way down under bite protocols, in fact most everything you've been taught to do is now considered wrong, no tourniquet, no suckining the venom out, etc.
Link


Any treatments offered by traditional healers, witchdoctors, and Shamans are ineffective.

I take exception to this. Doctors ARE traditional healers. Antivenin IS the traditional cure. When technology develops that lets us neutralize poisonous molecules with a field from our smart phone, or some as yet undiscovered chemical that doesn't put people into shock like antivenin, it will seem quite a quaint outdated practice that only barbaric monkeys would use, and then only about a week after they stopped sniffing their own butt.

Snake handlers in India get bit a lot. I'm sure that whatever they do, there's some good in the practice or they'd have learned not to do it by now. Is it as good as antivenin? No. Doesn't mean it's bad, necessarily. And if I did just get bit by a rattler, I recon some lime in da coconut would go down smooth.
 
2012-09-17 06:04:02 AM  
Hero tag not available?
 
2012-09-17 06:55:58 AM  
Oh, come on. I've relocated a few copperheads out of the crawlspace at the home we rented here in MD. They're not very aggressive. A long stick, a cooler, and a bit of common sense is all that's needed.
We live about 1/4 mile from that place now, and in the eighteen years since, I've only had to kill one. Ok, my hubby killed it, but we had a 3 year old. ( and a severe drought, which is what drove it to stalk our front yard- 3 strikes and you're out, snakey )
 
2012-09-17 07:53:45 AM  
My 70 year old neighbor with two bad knees (since replaced) went on autopilot when his grand daughter was bit by a copperhead. He got a shovel, killed the snake, and had both the carcass and little girl to the hospital in about 10 minutes. Only a 5 minute ride to the hospital, but pretty impressive nonetheless.

It must have been a dry bite, she was fine a couple days later. Fang marks were pretty cool and she liked to show them off.
 
2012-09-17 08:16:30 AM  
That's the most poisonous snake in this entire region! So what I'm gonna do, is sneak up on him, and jam my thumb in his butthole! Cranky! -jumps on snake- Boy this snake is really pissed! I'm gonna jam my thumb in his butthole now! Oh yeah, that pissed it off alright!
 
2012-09-17 08:32:57 AM  
My grandparents used to have a house along the Wicomico River up in MD. I spent most of my summers there growing up. Great place - out in the boonies, us kids would leave the house after breakfast, land at somebody's house for lunch and then not be back until dinner.

Anywho, one summer for some reason the copperheads and the black snakes were mating. Made for some tricky encounters. I remember several times I'd see a "black snake" sunning itself on the road and I'd go up to it only realize at the last second that the head was the wrong shape. Almost got bit several times.

Had a water moccasin chase me once, too. Nearly flayed all the skin off my knees and broke every fingernail I had trying to scrabble up a concrete boat ramp to get away from it.

And yet I still love snakes. Go figure.

Now spiders, on the other hand...[shudder]...and don't even get me STARTED on roaches. Ugh.
 
2012-09-17 08:51:08 AM  
Had a water moccasin chase me once, too. Nearly flayed all the skin off my knees and broke every fingernail I had trying to scrabble up a concrete boat ramp to get away from it.

Water moccasins (aka cottonmouth) don't live in Maryland. It was a watersnake- harmless, but bitey
 
2012-09-17 10:08:24 AM  

doglover: Snake handlers in India get bit a lot. I'm sure that whatever they do, there's some good in the practice or they'd have learned not to do it by now.


This is the sort of thinking that inhibits medical progress.
 
2012-09-17 10:28:54 AM  
CSB
When I was in High School in California I caught a cute little snake on the way to school, about 5 inches long and maybe 1/4 inch thick. Put it in my shirt pocket, carried it around all day and showed it to the girls. Biology class was 6th period so I waited to show it to the teacher. After class I went up to his desk and pulled it out of my pocket because I wanted to know what kind of snake it was. Turned out it was a saddleback rattler baby that had probably just hatched a few days before I found it. Teacher lost his nut. Asked me if it had bitten me, which it hadn't. Wanted to confiscate it, which I refused. Cute little bugger. I took it up to Coyote Hill after school and left it at the old mine up next to the big Stanford RT dish.
 
2012-09-17 12:48:33 PM  
This happened to a guy at a shooting range in Missouri, too. Got bit picking up his brass. Snatched up the snake and drove both to the hospital.

He didn't kill the snake either, which I loved.

/if you must be bitten by a venomous snake, make it a copperhead. Unpleasant, but not deadly.
//gorgeous snake
 
2012-09-17 02:06:16 PM  
FTA:

Police do not know the man's age or where he lives.

Why the fark should they or that it even matters?
 
2012-09-17 07:35:58 PM  
Has someone brought up the fact that we only have one variety of anti-venom for pit vipers native to the US making the whole point of killing the snake to ID it completely pointless (unless the hospital can't tell the difference between a non-venomous and venomous snake bite in which case you might want to find a different hospital).
 
2012-09-17 08:55:59 PM  
Has someone brought up the fact that we only have one variety of anti-venom for pit vipers native to the US making the whole point of killing the snake to ID it completely pointless (unless the hospital can't tell the difference between a non-venomous and venomous snake bite in which case you might want to find a different hospital).

excellent point. The only possible reason to bring the snake would be to positively identify that it was in fact a venomous species and not a mistaken identification, which could be useful in determining the best course of treatment (if any).
 
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