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(Vimeo)   Animation of every exoplanet discovered by the Kepler mission, each drawn to scale orbiting a single star   (vimeo.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, Kepler Mission, Kepler, single star, Binary Star, planets, exoplanets, equilibrium, circular orbit  
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3592 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Sep 2012 at 5:04 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2012-09-16 09:56:26 PM  
Pretty cool but wish the music wasn't the same as that Cassini animation from a while back.
 
2012-09-16 10:46:21 PM  

bob_ross: Pretty cool but wish the music wasn't the same as that Cassini animation from a while back.


Agreed... though at least it's not that terrible ;)
 
2012-09-16 11:39:44 PM  
Very cool. Lots of planets....
 
2012-09-16 11:54:33 PM  
Yay, more fake astronomy animations with pretentious music.

Seriously, you have a dozen robots out there taking REAL PHOTOGRAPHS. Show us the real deal.
 
2012-09-16 11:55:49 PM  
Repeat
 
2012-09-17 12:10:46 AM  
Vimeo never plays right on my sad, sad lappy.
 
2012-09-17 12:14:14 AM  
Is gravity the reason that my extension cords get tangled? Or more precisely put are we living in a singularity? The reason that I'm saying this is because if I took the ends of all of my extension cords and each one was represented by the motion of each of those larger planets -then you will find that the massive gordian knot created is precisely represented (and predicted) by the motion of all of those planets. It's eerie, like there is no way that this could be mere coincidence. So I threw that mess of cables into the recycle bin and used my company credit card to purchase new damn cables. fark entropy.
 
2012-09-17 12:50:24 AM  
That IS cool!
 
2012-09-17 01:27:11 AM  
I can't wait to see what is around the Centauri systems.
 
2012-09-17 01:56:15 AM  

doglover: Seriously, you have a dozen robots out there taking REAL PHOTOGRAPHS. Show us the real deal.


If they showed you the photos you wouldn't see much of anything. Many of these planets are only detected because of the very slightest in flickering of the light from a star or the slightest wobble in the star. Those flickers and wobbles are enough to calculate orbits and planetary size, but that doesn't mean the pictures of those flickers and wobbles will actually produce anything you can really see as a planet.
 
2012-09-17 02:26:41 AM  

DeltaPunch: bob_ross: Pretty cool but wish the music wasn't the same as that Cassini animation from a while back.

Agreed... though at least it's not that terrible ;)


Care to share with the class?
 
2012-09-17 04:49:16 AM  

WhyteRaven74: doglover: Seriously, you have a dozen robots out there taking REAL PHOTOGRAPHS. Show us the real deal.

If they showed you the photos you wouldn't see much of anything. Many of these planets are only detected because of the very slightest in flickering of the light from a star or the slightest wobble in the star. Those flickers and wobbles are enough to calculate orbits and planetary size, but that doesn't mean the pictures of those flickers and wobbles will actually produce anything you can really see as a planet.


And? We have a bunch of working cameras on mars right now. Screw pictures of exoplanets. I can imagine that shiat. I wanna see ACTUAL space junk. Show me Phobos and Diemos in the night sky. Show me rocks, dust, and a smiley face some clever dick made while taking samples with the laser. Show me what you got, science. I'm ready.
 
2012-09-17 05:19:17 AM  

Because People in power are Stupid: Is gravity the reason that my extension cords get tangled? Or more precisely put are we living in a singularity? The reason that I'm saying this is because if I took the ends of all of my extension cords and each one was represented by the motion of each of those larger planets -then you will find that the massive gordian knot created is precisely represented (and predicted) by the motion of all of those planets. It's eerie, like there is no way that this could be mere coincidence. So I threw that mess of cables into the recycle bin and used my company credit card to purchase new damn cables. fark entropy.


Knot Theory.
 
2012-09-17 05:38:40 AM  
Nope, no life out there... Not on any of those planets or the BILLIONS of others just in our galaxy. Nope, nothing at all...
 
2012-09-17 06:32:32 AM  

doglover: I'm ready


Son, we live in a world that has cameras, and those cameras have to be guarded by men with photoshop. Who's gonna do it? You? You, doglover? I have a greater responsibility than you can possibly fathom!

You weep for NASA and you curse the GOP. You have that luxury. You have the luxury of not knowing what I know: that NASA's death, while tragic, probably would save lives. And my existence, while grotesque and incomprehensible to you, saves lives!

You don't want the proof, because deep down in places you don't talk about at parties, you want me on that camera! You need me on that camera! We use words like "exposure", "TIFF", "aperture". We use these words as the backbone of a life spent photographing things. You use them as punchlines!

I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it! I would rather you just said "Thank you," and went on your way. Otherwise, I suggest you pick up a camera, and post what you got. Either way, I don't give a damn what you think you are entitled to view!

/You can't handle the proof
 
2012-09-17 06:39:27 AM  

uttertosh: o


golfclap
 
2012-09-17 07:52:13 AM  

Bucky Katt: That IS cool!


No it isn't. I see planets in orbits outside of other planets but orbiting faster. That can't happen.
 
2012-09-17 08:32:56 AM  

dittybopper: Bucky Katt: That IS cool!

No it isn't. I see planets in orbits outside of other planets but orbiting faster. That can't happen.


I believe that the planet size and orbit size was enlarged/shrunk so the star size was the same for all planets. Star size (diameter) does not go up perfectly with mass, so the ones orbiting massive stars will go around quite a bit faster tan those orbiting red dwarfs.
 
2012-09-17 08:34:04 AM  

doglover: Yay, more fake astronomy animations with pretentious music.

Seriously, you have a dozen robots out there taking REAL PHOTOGRAPHS. Show us the real deal.


It may be quite a photodump, but here you go... every image ever taken by Kepler:

done! Hope you liked it!
 
2012-09-17 08:36:56 AM  

Yotto: dittybopper: Bucky Katt: That IS cool!

No it isn't. I see planets in orbits outside of other planets but orbiting faster. That can't happen.

I believe that the planet size and orbit size was enlarged/shrunk so the star size was the same for all planets. Star size (diameter) does not go up perfectly with mass, so the ones orbiting massive stars will go around quite a bit faster tan those orbiting red dwarfs.


A planet orbiting a more massive star is going to be going faster at the same orbital radius.
 
2012-09-17 08:39:48 AM  

dittybopper: Bucky Katt: That IS cool!

No it isn't. I see planets in orbits outside of other planets but orbiting faster. That can't happen.


FTFA: "These candidates were detected around 1770 unique stars, but are animated in orbit around a single star. They are drawn to scale with accurate radii (in r / r* ), orbital periods, and orbital distances (in d / r*)."

I am not a physicist, but I'm pretty sure that the mass of the planet's star will have a definite effect on the orbital period. A planet orbiting a more massive sun will have a shorter orbital period than a planet orbiting a less massive sun at the same distance. So, it makes sense that some planets further out would actually be orbiting faster in this animation.

What struck me was how few planets there are out near the distance of Earth's orbit (the third white ellipse from the star in the animation). I imagine this is because the farther out from the star a planet is, the less effect it has on the star's spectrum/wobble as we see it.
 
2012-09-17 08:41:40 AM  

doglover: uttertosh: o

golfclap


capdoff

dittybopper: That can't happen


In a simulation that includes all results shown in relation to one variable being held constant in order to utilize the same scale, whilst maintaining individual proportionality of all other values? Sure it can!

Using multiple ratios to provide a readable output from a dataset is a lot like using magnets to move iron filings around a piece of paper - some may even bring into question which class of character you are, cos rogues and warriors sure don't seem have this ability. You can't explain that.

/mat med metafor är typ som "service with a similie"
 
2012-09-17 08:44:36 AM  
Also, the more massive a planet is, the faster it will orbit, although this effect is much less than a corresponding percentage increase in the mass of the star.

I found this fun little tool: Link
 
2012-09-17 08:49:02 AM  
www.writeups.org
/approves
 
2012-09-17 08:51:11 AM  

Invincible: Yotto: dittybopper: Bucky Katt: That IS cool!

No it isn't. I see planets in orbits outside of other planets but orbiting faster. That can't happen.

I believe that the planet size and orbit size was enlarged/shrunk so the star size was the same for all planets. Star size (diameter) does not go up perfectly with mass, so the ones orbiting massive stars will go around quite a bit faster tan those orbiting red dwarfs.

A planet orbiting a more massive star is going to be going faster at the same orbital radius.


Yeah, but it just looks *DAMN* odd.
 
2012-09-17 08:57:48 AM  
I can't wrap my mind around how those giant planets closest to their star don't just collapse into it. Astronomy never ceases to amaze.
 
2012-09-17 10:46:41 AM  

SJKebab: DeltaPunch: bob_ross: Pretty cool but wish the music wasn't the same as that Cassini animation from a while back.

Agreed... though at least it's not that terrible ;)

Care to share with the class?


Here. It's a little artsy but awesome.

And just in case anyone hasn't seen the original Cassini glory. (not the same music, in this case)
 
2012-09-17 11:04:30 AM  

DeltaPunch: SJKebab: DeltaPunch: bob_ross: Pretty cool but wish the music wasn't the same as that Cassini animation from a while back.

Agreed... though at least it's not that terrible ;)

Care to share with the class?

Here. It's a little artsy but awesome.

And just in case anyone hasn't seen the original Cassini glory. (not the same music, in this case)


Thanks for that. I quite liked the artiness of that one actually. Spiffing.
 
2012-09-17 12:59:37 PM  
Interesting... I wonder how they solved the 2300-body problem.

/not serious
 
2012-09-17 01:05:28 PM  
We have a bunch of working cameras on mars right now. Screw pictures of exoplanets. I can imagine that shiat.

If you are not interested in exoplanets, don't follow links and comment in threads about exoplanets. You might as well go to baseball threads and complain they don't have pictures of football players.

I'm glad to see that there are planets in a livable temperature range (even if they are fairly far in). Might be hope for us yet.
 
2012-09-17 04:37:55 PM  

brianbankerus: Vimeo never plays right on my sad, sad lappy.


Vimeo rarely plays right on anything I have. Here 'tis on the MeTubes.
 
2012-09-17 05:03:29 PM  

RatOmeter: brianbankerus: Vimeo never plays right on my sad, sad lappy.

Vimeo rarely plays right on anything I have. Here 'tis on the MeTubes.


Much better. Many thanks!
 
2012-09-17 08:13:04 PM  

doglover: WhyteRaven74: doglover: Seriously, you have a dozen robots out there taking REAL PHOTOGRAPHS. Show us the real deal.

If they showed you the photos you wouldn't see much of anything. Many of these planets are only detected because of the very slightest in flickering of the light from a star or the slightest wobble in the star. Those flickers and wobbles are enough to calculate orbits and planetary size, but that doesn't mean the pictures of those flickers and wobbles will actually produce anything you can really see as a planet.

And? We have a bunch of working cameras on mars right now. Screw pictures of exoplanets. I can imagine that shiat. I wanna see ACTUAL space junk. Show me Phobos and Diemos in the night sky. Show me rocks, dust, and a smiley face some clever dick made while taking samples with the laser. Show me what you got, science. I'm ready.


Would you like to see things we wouldn't believe? Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. You watch C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate. All those moments will be lost in time... like tears in rain... Time to die.

/some clever Dick
 
2012-09-17 09:16:12 PM  

Fano: doglover: WhyteRaven74: doglover: Seriously, you have a dozen robots out there taking REAL PHOTOGRAPHS. Show us the real deal.

If they showed you the photos you wouldn't see much of anything. Many of these planets are only detected because of the very slightest in flickering of the light from a star or the slightest wobble in the star. Those flickers and wobbles are enough to calculate orbits and planetary size, but that doesn't mean the pictures of those flickers and wobbles will actually produce anything you can really see as a planet.

And? We have a bunch of working cameras on mars right now. Screw pictures of exoplanets. I can imagine that shiat. I wanna see ACTUAL space junk. Show me Phobos and Diemos in the night sky. Show me rocks, dust, and a smiley face some clever dick made while taking samples with the laser. Show me what you got, science. I'm ready.

Would you like to see things we wouldn't believe? Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. You watch C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate. All those moments will be lost in time... like tears in rain... Time to die.

/some clever Dick


Um, that's Roy Batty's line.
 
2012-09-17 09:42:21 PM  
RatOmeter:
/some clever Dick

Um, that's Roy Batty's line.


... and Rutger Hauer's ad-lib in the film.
 
2012-09-17 10:53:55 PM  

RatOmeter: Would you like to see things we wouldn't believe? Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. You watch C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate. All those moments will be lost in time... like tears in rain... Time to die.

/some clever Dick

Um, that's Roy Batty's line.


He hasn't showed up here, so I'll speak for him.
 
2012-09-17 10:55:16 PM  
If they find Kolob, it could change the whole landscape of the 2012 election.
 
2012-09-17 11:51:18 PM  
What were those other lines around the star? Some sort of scale? Orbits in our solar system for reference?
 
2012-09-17 11:55:09 PM  
A few of those were incorrect.
 
2012-09-18 09:12:45 AM  

r1chard3: What were those other lines around the star? Some sort of scale? Orbits in our solar system for reference?


FTFA (might have to click on "Read more" or something): "Three white rings illustrate the average orbital distances of Mercury, Venus, and Earth on the same scale."
 
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