Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Huffington Post)   This just in: Reading books is good for your brain. In other news, the world is round, Obama is president   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 100
    More: Obvious, banned books, Jonathan Franzen, young-adult fiction, Grand Central Publishing, organizational structure, McSweeney, female genitalia, Random House  
•       •       •

3002 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Sep 2012 at 6:56 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



100 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-09-16 06:53:47 PM  
Huh. Who'd have thought?
 
2012-09-16 06:57:44 PM  
Not the books I'm reading, that's for sure.
 
2012-09-16 06:59:31 PM  
Sorry, subby, book larnin' is where you get the tinfoil whut keeps God from gettin' in your brainwaves. And 0bammy ain't my preznint. He comes from that country on the underside of the world where they bark like dogs, jump around on a single, giant foot and have eyes in their stomachs.
 
2012-09-16 07:01:23 PM  
Also, this:

28.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-09-16 07:01:32 PM  
What about books on tape?
 
2012-09-16 07:01:51 PM  
Very good for expanding your mind

imageshack.us
 
2012-09-16 07:02:52 PM  
25.media.tumblr.com

What are you readin' for?
 
2012-09-16 07:03:21 PM  
Yes, Obama is president of the world.
 
2012-09-16 07:03:26 PM  
What are "3 things Tea Party Republicans don't believe in?
 
2012-09-16 07:04:21 PM  
Or so the liberal media wants you to believe....

/if its round why haven't I fallen off yet?
 
2012-09-16 07:05:29 PM  
that muslin ain't my president
 
2012-09-16 07:08:23 PM  

reillan: What are "3 things Tea Party Republicans don't believe in?


We have a winner!
 
2012-09-16 07:08:40 PM  

MrEricSir: Not the books I'm reading, that's for sure.


Indeed, I find it hard to believe this is good for your brain.

photo.goodreads.com 

I've actually read it (don't ask) and felt dumber for it afterwards.
 
2012-09-16 07:08:57 PM  
Ever since I tuk the Evelyn Woodhead sped reddin coars, my reddin has improved 100 procent.
 
2012-09-16 07:10:25 PM  
.
i.imgur.com
 
2012-09-16 07:10:53 PM  
if its good they'll make a movie of it. i'll catch it then.
 
2012-09-16 07:11:14 PM  
Counter-study finds that reading books isn't good for your brain which means Sarah Palin is automatically president and Obama has to make love to the president of the Flat Earth society while the Timecube guy films it
 
2012-09-16 07:11:25 PM  

fusillade762: MrEricSir: Not the books I'm reading, that's for sure.

Indeed, I find it hard to believe this is good for your brain.

[photo.goodreads.com image 299x450] 

I've actually read it (don't ask) and felt dumber for it afterwards.


I tried. I felt like I was being yelled at from the first page.
 
2012-09-16 07:12:03 PM  
Looking at the picture that came with the article. I think it's better if the brain is still in your head.
 
2012-09-16 07:12:35 PM  
If reading was good for your brain then why are there so many retards in the Politics tab?
 
2012-09-16 07:13:56 PM  
Wasn't this announced about ten years ago after some Alzheimer research project? Reading was noted to stave off onset and even slow deterioration of existing patients.
 
2012-09-16 07:16:46 PM  
In spite of these findings, Philips warned against "historical nostalgia, or assuming those of the 18th century were less distracted than we are today." She asserts that Enlightenment-era writers (her area of expertise) were just as concerned about withering attention spans as we are today.

I...don't get the path this article took. I can infer, but how about the article writer stop trying to throw out some tangential comment and instead make an informative article, such as the one you basically used which says exactly what is meant by "blood flow increased beyond executive function regions" by including the fact blood flow increases to regions associated with concentration. Just another sentence or two, just a few more details...
 
2012-09-16 07:23:10 PM  

fusillade762: MrEricSir: Not the books I'm reading, that's for sure.

Indeed, I find it hard to believe this is good for your brain.

[photo.goodreads.com image 299x450] 

I've actually read it (don't ask) and felt dumber for it afterwards.


You are a rare person to have read the book. I see a lot of that book unread in the thrift store. Most of those people buy the book thinking it's readable.
 
2012-09-16 07:23:16 PM  
I have thought once that it was only books but also billboard that I read.
 
2012-09-16 07:24:34 PM  
I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.
 
2012-09-16 07:24:59 PM  

Lurk sober post drunk: if its good they'll make a movie of it. i'll catch it then.


You're drunk.
 
2012-09-16 07:28:30 PM  
It's funny because the people who deny Obama's presidency also can't read.
 
2012-09-16 07:32:22 PM  
"...the world is round. Obama is president."

Citation please
 
2012-09-16 07:34:35 PM  
Meanwhile, by the same brain blood-flow metric used in the article, watching the movie is even better, which just goes to show you that the stupid derp of reading being quantifiably good in any sense is just more pull-the-numbers-out-of-my-ass-ism.

At least they didn't derp their way to the paragon of hurf-durf, and once again reiterate the stupidest utterance ever...'reading is good for the imagination'. Durrrrr...people who read are 25.8% more imaginative that those who didn't, with a 3.9 SEM and 19.1% to 30.9% CI95%...durrrf With a median increase in imagination quotient of 3.6 imagination units. Durrrr.
 
2012-09-16 07:35:20 PM  

flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.


I'm sorry
 
2012-09-16 07:43:47 PM  

skinink: If reading was good for your brain then why are there so many retards in the Politics tab?


Based on the responses to linked articles and posts you see here, how many of these people do you think can actually read?
 
2012-09-16 07:44:04 PM  

wildcardjack: fusillade762: MrEricSir: Not the books I'm reading, that's for sure.

Indeed, I find it hard to believe this is good for your brain.

[photo.goodreads.com image 299x450] 

I've actually read it (don't ask) and felt dumber for it afterwards.

You are a rare person to have read the book. I see a lot of that book unread in the thrift store. Most of those people buy the book thinking it's readable.


A friend of mine got it as a gift from someone. He had no interest in reading it so I thought I'd give it a shot. Ugh. Part of me wanted to get a pen and mark all the falsehoods, hyperbole and flat out lies it contained. But then I realized I'd probably be out of ink after the first couple chapters.

The funny part is I tried to sell it at Powell's later (with a bunch of other books) and the buyer there almost laughed at me. Needless to say they didn't want it (it was the only one of the bunch they didn't take).
 
2012-09-16 07:47:42 PM  

Lafiel: flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.

I'm sorry


It's a good book! His recent books however...
 
2012-09-16 07:47:52 PM  

flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.


I always wondered what people did while listening to books. Please enlighten me.

Reason for said wondering: if you are listening to the book while doing other things, wouldn't you need to rewind a couple of times because you missed something? When I'm reading I'll lose track of the world around me, I've had people yell at me just because they couldn't get my attention using a normal tone of voice. But while listening to a book I would be doing a 100 other things, which in turn would mean that I'd have my attention at those other things which would mean I'd miss at least halve the book.
 
2012-09-16 07:51:47 PM  

TwowheelinTim: Lurk sober post drunk: if its good they'll make a movie of it. i'll catch it then.

You're drunk.


heh, true. drunk and rereading a favorite novella. it's like comfort food.
 
2012-09-16 07:52:12 PM  
They haven't fired Obama yet...?
 
2012-09-16 07:52:57 PM  

DerAppie: flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.

I always wondered what people did while listening to books. Please enlighten me.

Reason for said wondering: if you are listening to the book while doing other things, wouldn't you need to rewind a couple of times because you missed something? When I'm reading I'll lose track of the world around me, I've had people yell at me just because they couldn't get my attention using a normal tone of voice. But while listening to a book I would be doing a 100 other things, which in turn would mean that I'd have my attention at those other things which would mean I'd miss at least halve the book.


well which is it? I'd suggest less back swing with the cleaver if it's miss...
 
2012-09-16 07:53:09 PM  
Obamas tweets about the four killings in Libya--1(ONE) tweets about Jay-Z and Beyonce--47..

So yes, it's very hard to believe this shiathead is president
 
2012-09-16 07:55:32 PM  

DerAppie: flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.

I always wondered what people did while listening to books. Please enlighten me.

Reason for said wondering: if you are listening to the book while doing other things, wouldn't you need to rewind a couple of times because you missed something? When I'm reading I'll lose track of the world around me, I've had people yell at me just because they couldn't get my attention using a normal tone of voice. But while listening to a book I would be doing a 100 other things, which in turn would mean that I'd have my attention at those other things which would mean I'd miss at least halve the book.


When I first started listening to audio books, it was hard to concentrate on the story and work at the same time. But after some expirence with it, it's easy to dive right in. I do have a problem with ignoring the world while listening, but it's a good thing sometimes :D
 
2012-09-16 07:56:55 PM  

DerAppie: flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.

I always wondered what people did while listening to books. Please enlighten me.

Reason for said wondering: if you are listening to the book while doing other things, wouldn't you need to rewind a couple of times because you missed something? When I'm reading I'll lose track of the world around me, I've had people yell at me just because they couldn't get my attention using a normal tone of voice. But while listening to a book I would be doing a 100 other things, which in turn would mean that I'd have my attention at those other things which would mean I'd miss at least halve the book.


I majored in Literature for my undergrad degree, I was studying full time and working full time plus I had an hour's drive to and from work each day. so I would put an audio book into the 'tape player' for the drive each day. I did occasionally realise I had no idea what had just been said, but it was a great way of 'reading' during some down time. I usually still picked up a print copy of the book for writing the assignments (although, due to 'shiat happening' I did write up Brighton Rock without ever having picked up a print copy (and still passed).
 
2012-09-16 07:58:30 PM  

DerAppie: flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.

I always wondered what people did while listening to books. Please enlighten me.

Reason for said wondering: if you are listening to the book while doing other things, wouldn't you need to rewind a couple of times because you missed something? When I'm reading I'll lose track of the world around me, I've had people yell at me just because they couldn't get my attention using a normal tone of voice. But while listening to a book I would be doing a 100 other things, which in turn would mean that I'd have my attention at those other things which would mean I'd miss at least halve the book.



I used to listen to audiobooks when I had to drive a lot at work, it beat the hell out of anything that the local "DJs" were puking into the airwaves, now that I have my little workshop I listen to em while I cut, file, stain or any of the other 999999 boring repetitive things I do, it passes the time and only rarely do I have to go back and find out what I missed.
 
2012-09-16 07:58:50 PM  

fusillade762: MrEricSir: Not the books I'm reading, that's for sure.

Indeed, I find it hard to believe this is good for your brain.

 

I've actually read it (don't ask) and felt dumber for it afterwards.


Sun Tzu would applaud you. Don't be ashamed.
 
2012-09-16 08:01:03 PM  
Not all books.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gor
 
2012-09-16 08:02:21 PM  

SevenizGud: At least they didn't derp their way to the paragon of hurf-durf... Durrrrr...people who read are 25.8% more imaginative that those who didn't, with a 3.9 SEM and 19.1% to 30.9% CI95%...durrrf With a median increase in imagination quotient of 3.6 imagination units. Durrrr.


I dont know. Those numbers do sound fairly convincing.
 
2012-09-16 08:05:29 PM  

SevenizGud: Meanwhile, by the same brain blood-flow metric used in the article, watching the movie is even better, which just goes to show you that the stupid derp of reading being quantifiably good in any sense is just more pull-the-numbers-out-of-my-ass-ism.

At least they didn't derp their way to the paragon of hurf-durf, and once again reiterate the stupidest utterance ever...'reading is good for the imagination'. Durrrrr...people who read are 25.8% more imaginative that those who didn't, with a 3.9 SEM and 19.1% to 30.9% CI95%...durrrf With a median increase in imagination quotient of 3.6 imagination units. Durrrr.


I'm all for kangaroo trials and public executions for those who use the word derp. Really.
 
2012-09-16 08:06:55 PM  

fusillade762: MrEricSir: Not the books I'm reading, that's for sure.

Indeed, I find it hard to believe this is good for your brain.

[photo.goodreads.com image 299x450] 

I've actually read it (don't ask) and felt dumber for it afterwards.


It's good for your brain to understand that there really are stupid assholes and coonts in this world.

What it is bad for is your blood pressure, which is why I can never even look at her "books".
 
2012-09-16 08:11:59 PM  
I thought the Earth was an oblate spheroid, not round...
What's an Obama? It sounds like a colon cleanser...
 
2012-09-16 08:19:50 PM  
I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.
 
2012-09-16 08:31:00 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.


No, but I can say that reading "50 Shades" is still better for your brain than staring glassy-eyed at "Honey Boo-Boo" for 45 minutes.
 
2012-09-16 08:31:05 PM  

flamingboar:

When I first started listening to audio books, it was hard to concentrate on the story and work at the same time. But after some expirence with it, it's easy to dive right in. I do have a problem with ignoring the world while listening, but it's a good thing sometimes :D


I just can't see me choosing a audiobook over the actual text, just personal preferences I guess. The only exception being the car, as mentioned by others. You aren't doing anything exceptionally intensive (especially on the highway) so you'd be able to focus on the audio. But I'd still want the book for my collection which would mean that I'd need to travel by car at least 10x as much as I do now to finish the audio book within the month, or finish the book on day one because fark it, eating and sleeping are overrated and finish the printed copy.
 
2012-09-16 08:32:30 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.

No, but I can say that reading "50 Shades" is still better for your brain than staring glassy-eyed at "Honey Boo-Boo" for 45 minutes.


If you can be entertained by Honey Boo-Boo, you have way bigger problems than you realize....
 
2012-09-16 08:34:00 PM  

DerAppie: flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.

I always wondered what people did while listening to books. Please enlighten me.


You don't own a car, do you?

/Wacky Europeans.
//That said, I'd rather read a book than have one read to me.
 
2012-09-16 08:35:38 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.

No, but I can say that reading "50 Shades" is still better for your brain than staring glassy-eyed at "Honey Boo-Boo" for 45 minutes.


True enough. It's all about your attention level, too, I'm sure. Staring glassy-eyed at anything can;t be particularly good for your intellectual development. And as a Librarian, I do think that young children should be encouraged to read print materials as a matter of development, both in reading comprehension and in the physical development of their brains' abilities to readily interpret symbol-based communications. Fiction is also important, IMHO - I think it helps develop critical skills, as well as creativity.

I'm a fine one to talk, though, I never read fiction these days.
 
2012-09-16 08:46:30 PM  

diaphoresis: I thought the Earth was an oblate spheroid, not round...
.


Those aren't exclusive terms- something can be round without being perfectly spherical.

As for TFA, duh. Who would have ever thought that engaging in long form, complex arguments would have strengthened your brain's ability to deal with complex arguments and situations? As a bonus, your writing will probably improve too.

Benevolent Misanthrope: I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.


TED talks won't improve the functioning of your brain. They're quick hits that give you a little more information that you might be able to apply if you remember it correctly, but a good book, and even many poor ones, will have all sorts of elements and characters interacting in complex ways. A book is a large and complex thing, but it's also a cohesive whole, and engaging and learning that complexity makes your brain work beyond simply acquiring new facts to use within your existing skills. You'll build up various neural pathways, and you'll be able to process longer and more complex ideas, understand greater nuances and shades of meaning, and synthesize more and increasingly complex elements when forming thoughts and ideas of your own. Things like TED talks just give you more ideas to throw into the mix, they won't improve the actual ability to synthesize.

50 Shades of Gray won't be as beneficial in that regard as Les Miserables, but it probably will engage your brain in understanding the various elements going into the plot. Admittedly, I have never read any of the 50 shades stuff, and I do know that I felt dumber after a few sentences of Twilight, so my theory on bad books probably helping, but helping less could be complete bunk.
 
2012-09-16 08:48:12 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: Fiction is also important, IMHO - I think it helps develop critical skills, as well as creativity.

I'm a fine one to talk, though, I never read fiction these days.


But you read Fark, so probably at least 25% of it is fiction ^_~
 
2012-09-16 08:49:22 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.

No, but I can say that reading "50 Shades" is still better for your brain than staring glassy-eyed at "Honey Boo-Boo" for 45 minutes.




Bud a .44 magnum to the temple is better for your brain than 45 min of honey boo boo...
 
2012-09-16 08:52:02 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Fiction is also important, IMHO - I think it helps develop critical skills, as well as creativity.

I'm a fine one to talk, though, I never read fiction these days.


Good fiction can be much better for building a better mind than nonfiction, depending on the book. If somebody can make it through Les Miserables (admittedly my favorite book) without developing a broader prospective on society and a much more nuanced concept of justice, then I'll eat one of my copies. In the hands of a skilled author, fiction can explore a lot of topics, values, and emotional ranges that would be very hard to touch in a nonfiction book.
 
2012-09-16 08:59:18 PM  
Really, subby? The world is round? Why haven't we fallen off yet?
 
2012-09-16 09:03:46 PM  

Pribar: Bud a .44 magnum to the temple is better for your brain than 45 min of honey boo boo...


I have a hard enough time standing what Jimmy Kimmel and Joel McHale show.
 
2012-09-16 09:08:34 PM  
Let's get smrat!

i373.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-16 09:08:48 PM  

jeffreyh: I'm all for kangaroo trials and public executions for those who use the word derp. Really.


No.
 
2012-09-16 09:15:44 PM  
To be accurate, the world isn't perfectly round and Obama is far from being a perfect president.
 
2012-09-16 09:16:06 PM  
If you don't think reading is good for your brain, you're probably moving your lips while you read this.
 
2012-09-16 09:19:34 PM  

jeffreyh: I'm all for kangaroo trials and public executions for those who use the word derp. Really.


You are positively for the criminal homocide, and constitutional violation of people who use a particular word?

At least you aren't unreasonable.
 
2012-09-16 09:22:37 PM  

SevenizGud: jeffreyh: I'm all for kangaroo trials and public executions for those who use the word derp. Really.

You are positively for the criminal homocide, and constitutional violation of people who use a particular word?

At least you aren't unreasonable.


Nothing wrong with summary executions for irregardless, but derp is a good word.
 
2012-09-16 09:24:54 PM  

jeffreyh: Derp.


FTFY
 
2012-09-16 09:27:12 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: [25.media.tumblr.com image 400x300]

What are you readin' for?


outstanding
 
2012-09-16 09:31:18 PM  

bingethinker: If you don't think reading is good for your brain, you're probably moving your lips while you read this.


If you don't thank thonk thunk THINK radding, reeaeding, riding, READING is god GOOD for your brine, brenn, BRAIN, you're probilly prawbabble, PROBABLY moving your laps, leeps, LIPS while you read theese, thys THIS.

/just realized the Monty Python "Book at Bedtime" sketch doesn't really translate that well to type
 
2012-09-16 09:33:50 PM  

Master of the Flying Guillotine: Let's get smrat!

[i373.photobucket.com image 317x475]


You might like The Shadow War of the Night Dragons, Book One: The Dead City

/note the date of publication
 
2012-09-16 09:34:34 PM  

SevenizGud: jeffreyh: I'm all for kangaroo trials and public executions for those who use the word derp. Really.

You are positively for the criminal homocide, and constitutional violation of people who use a particular word?

At least you aren't unreasonable.


I have an idea, lets summarily execute anyone who uses hyperbole to make their point!
 
2012-09-16 09:41:29 PM  
i.usatoday.net

Approves of training one's wit
 
2012-09-16 09:41:43 PM  

cptjeff: Benevolent Misanthrope: Fiction is also important, IMHO - I think it helps develop critical skills, as well as creativity.

I'm a fine one to talk, though, I never read fiction these days.

Good fiction can be much better for building a better mind than nonfiction, depending on the book. If somebody can make it through Les Miserables (admittedly my favorite book) without developing a broader prospective on society and a much more nuanced concept of justice, then I'll eat one of my copies. In the hands of a skilled author, fiction can explore a lot of topics, values, and emotional ranges that would be very hard to touch in a nonfiction book.


Which is why I'm such a proponent of Shakespeare. To my mind, it's worth learning the language in order to reap the benefits of his insight into the subtleties of human nature.
 
2012-09-16 09:42:19 PM  
Real Patriots refer to this great country as The United States of America. Anyone who shortens it is an unpatriotic commie bastard and should be thrown out of the country.
 
2012-09-16 09:56:57 PM  

fusillade762: The funny part is I tried to sell it at Powell's later (with a bunch of other books) and the buyer there almost laughed at me. Needless to say they didn't want it (it was the only one of the bunch they didn't take).


Hence why they wind up at the thrift stores. Here we have Half Price Books, and they make "offers" on the whole load. What they can't use they actually "donate" to thrift stores for tax credit.

Oh, and go read your bible. By yourself, no handholding versions, no apologetic "how to read your bible" books.

It's the quickest way to atheism. When christians actually read the book and realize what's in it they tend to put it down. Forever.
 
2012-09-16 09:59:54 PM  
Was hoping for a few book recommendations, but I guess this is the wrong crowd.
 
2012-09-16 10:03:38 PM  

reillan: What are "3 things Tea Party Republicans don't believe in?


May a desert health inspector board up your sister.
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-09-16 10:06:37 PM  

wildcardjack: Oh, and go read your bible. By yourself, no handholding versions, no apologetic "how to read your bible" books.

It's the quickest way to atheism. When christians actually read the book and realize what's in it they tend to put it down. Forever.


I don't think it's even that hard. My ultra-religious grandparents gave me pretty much every "Superbook" VHS ever created when I was a kid (my parents were not exactly religious people). And even with its heavily-Bowdlerized versions of Bible stories in kid-friendly cartoon form, I remained thoroughly unconverted.

/He-Man > Superbook
//not a He-Man worshipper
///Eve had weird, featureless tits
 
2012-09-16 10:10:48 PM  
If this is true, then maybe watching Honey Boo Boo will cause the Twilight series to spontaneously combust.
 
2012-09-16 10:11:32 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.

No, but I can say that reading "50 Shades" is still better for your brain than staring glassy-eyed at "Honey Boo-Boo" for 45 minutes.

True enough. It's all about your attention level, too, I'm sure. Staring glassy-eyed at anything can;t be particularly good for your intellectual development. And as a Librarian, I do think that young children should be encouraged to read print materials as a matter of development, both in reading comprehension and in the physical development of their brains' abilities to readily interpret symbol-based communications. Fiction is also important, IMHO - I think it helps develop critical skills, as well as creativity.

I'm a fine one to talk, though, I never read fiction these days.


I've had trouble reading my favorites genres, SF and fantasy, since everyone and their brother hopped on the "vampire as hero" genre. And before that it was the "me and my pet telepathic dragon" genre. And about the same time it was "Hey, cyberpunk is selling, I'll throw in some computers and drugs and make me a mirrorshades book!"

I just stay the hell away from the fiction section entirely these days.
 
2012-09-16 10:23:10 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.

No, but I can say that reading "50 Shades" is still better for your brain than staring glassy-eyed at "Honey Boo-Boo" for 45 minutes.

True enough. It's all about your attention level, too, I'm sure. Staring glassy-eyed at anything can;t be particularly good for your intellectual development. And as a Librarian, I do think that young children should be encouraged to read print materials as a matter of development, both in reading comprehension and in the physical development of their brains' abilities to readily interpret symbol-based communications. Fiction is also important, IMHO - I think it helps develop critical skills, as well as creativity.

I'm a fine one to talk, though, I never read fiction these days.

I've had trouble reading my favorites genres, SF and fantasy, since everyone and their brother hopped on the "vampire as hero" genre. And before that it was the "me and my pet telepathic dragon" genre. And about the same time it was "Hey, cyberpunk is selling, I'll throw in some computers and drugs and make me a mirrorshades book!"

I just stay the hell away from the fiction section entirely these days.


I just look at what's coming into the Library these days and think, "For fark's sake I need to start writing again."
 
2012-09-16 10:23:57 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.

No, but I can say that reading "50 Shades" is still better for your brain than staring glassy-eyed at "Honey Boo-Boo" for 45 minutes.

True enough. It's all about your attention level, too, I'm sure. Staring glassy-eyed at anything can;t be particularly good for your intellectual development. And as a Librarian, I do think that young children should be encouraged to read print materials as a matter of development, both in reading comprehension and in the physical development of their brains' abilities to readily interpret symbol-based communications. Fiction is also important, IMHO - I think it helps develop critical skills, as well as creativity.

I'm a fine one to talk, though, I never read fiction these days.

I've had trouble reading my favorites genres, SF and fantasy, since everyone and their brother hopped on the "vampire as hero" genre. And before that it was the "me and my pet telepathic dragon" genre. And about the same time it was "Hey, cyberpunk is selling, I'll throw in some computers and drugs and make me a mirrorshades book!"

I just stay the hell away from the fiction section entirely these days.


Do you follow the Hugo Awards? It's heavily focuses on science fiction (although it allows the occasional fantasy), and if something gets nominated (let alone wins), that's usually a pretty good sign that it's worth reading.

Also, as of last year, if you buy any level of membership to the World Science Fiction Convention (including the $50 "supporting" membership that doesn't actually get you into the convention halls), you get an e-book packet with copies of all that year's nominated works (except TV shows and movies), you get to vote on the awards, and you get to nominate works for the following year. Keep in mind, however, that the e-book packet is meant to be an incentive to get people to vote on the awards (and $50 is a steal for that much new reading material), so if you buy the membership and download the e-books, don't forget to read them and vote!
 
2012-09-16 10:27:13 PM  

DerAppie: flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.

I always wondered what people did while listening to books. Please enlighten me.

Reason for said wondering: if you are listening to the book while doing other things, wouldn't you need to rewind a couple of times because you missed something? When I'm reading I'll lose track of the world around me, I've had people yell at me just because they couldn't get my attention using a normal tone of voice. But while listening to a book I would be doing a 100 other things, which in turn would mean that I'd have my attention at those other things which would mean I'd miss at least halve the book.


I have a commute that runs an hour each way. It's not all that intense but it is a good 45 miles each way. If I find that I have to concentrate more fully on my driving I can always turn the thing off and the story will pick up exactly where it left off. Each CD track runs around 3 to 6 minutes and I can always press the Skip Track button back a track or two and get my place again. The public library is free and I've done Catch 22 and half of Terry Prattchett's books* this year.

*The Wee Free Men books are a delight when someone else is doing all the pronunciation and sundry heavy lifting.
 
2012-09-16 10:35:21 PM  

anfrind: Do you follow the Hugo Awards? It's heavily focuses on science fiction (although it allows the occasional fantasy), and if something gets nominated (let alone wins), that's usually a pretty good sign that it's worth reading.

Also, as of last year, if you buy any level of membership to the World Science Fiction Convention (including the $50 "supporting" membership that doesn't actually get you into the convention halls), you get an e-book packet with copies of all that year's nominated works (except TV shows and movies), you get to vote on the awards, and you get to nominate works for the following year. Keep in mind, however, that the e-book packet is meant to be an incentive to get people to vote on the awards (and $50 is a steal for that much new reading material), so if you buy the membership and download the e-books, don't forget to read them and vote!



I was unaware. Thanks for the tip!
 
2012-09-16 10:37:04 PM  

DerAppie: flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.

I always wondered what people did while listening to books. Please enlighten me.

Reason for said wondering: if you are listening to the book while doing other things, wouldn't you need to rewind a couple of times because you missed something? When I'm reading I'll lose track of the world around me, I've had people yell at me just because they couldn't get my attention using a normal tone of voice. But while listening to a book I would be doing a 100 other things, which in turn would mean that I'd have my attention at those other things which would mean I'd miss at least halve the book.


Also,you would miss the cartoons that explain the text.
 
2012-09-16 10:39:01 PM  

Toquinha: Was hoping for a few book recommendations, but I guess this is the wrong crowd.


What are you looking for? Most people run screaming away from what I consider good books (Just finished a book called "The Origins of Political Order", for example- hardly beach reading for most), so if you're not interested in heavy tomes of nonfiction, I'm not always the best person to ask.
 
2012-09-16 10:54:24 PM  

cptjeff: Toquinha: Was hoping for a few book recommendations, but I guess this is the wrong crowd.

What are you looking for? Most people run screaming away from what I consider good books (Just finished a book called "The Origins of Political Order", for example- hardly beach reading for most), so if you're not interested in heavy tomes of nonfiction, I'm not always the best person to ask.


My bookmark is on page 303. It is a very interesting book.
 
2012-09-16 11:09:28 PM  
i.qkme.me
 
2012-09-16 11:22:59 PM  

publikenemy: Obamas tweets about the four killings in Libya--1(ONE) tweets about Jay-Z and Beyonce--47..

So yes, it's very hard to believe this shiathead is president


I get the feeling you read a lot.
 
2012-09-17 12:18:16 AM  
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-09-17 12:29:43 AM  
This just in: Reading books is good for your brain. In other news, the world is round, Obama is president an impostor Kenyan Communist

FTFY
 
2012-09-17 01:07:42 AM  
Out of 90 comments 3 were complete thread shiatters with only one bite on that trollbait.

Not bad dark...not bad
 
2012-09-17 01:18:43 AM  

diaphoresis: Gyrfalcon: Benevolent Misanthrope: I have a real problem with blanket statements like this. You cannot tell me that reading "50 Shades of Grey" is better for my intellectual development that watching TedTalks on Astrophysics, Sociology and World Politics.

No way.

No, but I can say that reading "50 Shades" is still better for your brain than staring glassy-eyed at "Honey Boo-Boo" for 45 minutes.

If you can be entertained by Honey Boo-Boo, you have way bigger problems than you realize....


I admit it's a toss-up but depending on your take on it, there can be merits to both.

On the one hand, you can watch Honey Boo-Boo and realize just how atrocious beauty pageants can be.

Or you can read 50 Shades and realize that Humbert Humbert wasn't that far off....
 
2012-09-17 02:42:25 AM  

Toquinha: Was hoping for a few book recommendations, but I guess this is the wrong crowd.


Farkers have turned me on to some really, REALLY great books/authors over the years, which is why I jump on any thread vaguely book-related. Like you, I'm disappointed.

/Eager for the November/December best-of-the-year lists which always generate good book recommendation threads
//And good Netflix stocking threads
 
2012-09-17 09:32:16 AM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: DerAppie: flamingboar: I love to read when I have time, but right now audio books are my friend. I'm listening to The Watchers by Dean Koontz.

I always wondered what people did while listening to books. Please enlighten me.

You don't own a car, do you?

/Wacky Europeans.
//That said, I'd rather read a book than have one read to me.


I do own a car, but I also live in a city that actively diminishes the usefulness of said car. Going to work on my bike is about 2 or 3 minutes shorter than taking the car. Which can go 70 km/h for most of the way.
 
2012-09-17 05:59:56 PM  

wildcardjack: fusillade762: The funny part is I tried to sell it at Powell's later (with a bunch of other books) and the buyer there almost laughed at me. Needless to say they didn't want it (it was the only one of the bunch they didn't take).

Hence why they wind up at the thrift stores. Here we have Half Price Books, and they make "offers" on the whole load. What they can't use they actually "donate" to thrift stores for tax credit.

Oh, and go read your bible. By yourself, no handholding versions, no apologetic "how to read your bible" books.

It's the quickest way to atheism. When christians actually read the book and realize what's in it they tend to put it down. Forever.


No, in reality exactly the opposite of what you said happens when people read their Bibles. Now you'll lose converts to athiesm when you try to understand string theory or this bubble universe mess, could that be what you meant?
 
2012-09-17 06:05:32 PM  

anfrind: wildcardjack: Oh, and go read your bible. By yourself, no handholding versions, no apologetic "how to read your bible" books.

It's the quickest way to atheism. When christians actually read the book and realize what's in it they tend to put it down. Forever.

I don't think it's even that hard. My ultra-religious grandparents gave me pretty much every "Superbook" VHS ever created when I was a kid (my parents were not exactly religious people). And even with its heavily-Bowdlerized versions of Bible stories in kid-friendly cartoon form, I remained thoroughly unconverted.

/He-Man > Superbook
//not a He-Man worshipper
///Eve had weird, featureless tits


Hard to argue with your slashies, but I have to say, you watched a cartoon that failed to change your life in a way that contrasted with that of your parents? Hardly shocking.
 
2012-09-17 06:07:01 PM  

andyfromfl: wildcardjack: fusillade762: The funny part is I tried to sell it at Powell's later (with a bunch of other books) and the buyer there almost laughed at me. Needless to say they didn't want it (it was the only one of the bunch they didn't take).

Hence why they wind up at the thrift stores. Here we have Half Price Books, and they make "offers" on the whole load. What they can't use they actually "donate" to thrift stores for tax credit.

Oh, and go read your bible. By yourself, no handholding versions, no apologetic "how to read your bible" books.

It's the quickest way to atheism. When christians actually read the book and realize what's in it they tend to put it down. Forever.

No, in reality exactly the opposite of what you said happens when people read their Bibles. Now you'll lose converts to athiesm when you try to understand string theory or this bubble universe mess, could that be what you meant?


He was talking about how the bible is full of crazy farked up shiat and doesn't make sense or even remain consistent. Most people who read it without a 'this is what the bible REALLY means' study aid notice it.
 
2012-09-17 06:07:43 PM  

lewismarktwo: andyfromfl: wildcardjack: fusillade762: The funny part is I tried to sell it at Powell's later (with a bunch of other books) and the buyer there almost laughed at me. Needless to say they didn't want it (it was the only one of the bunch they didn't take).

Hence why they wind up at the thrift stores. Here we have Half Price Books, and they make "offers" on the whole load. What they can't use they actually "donate" to thrift stores for tax credit.

Oh, and go read your bible. By yourself, no handholding versions, no apologetic "how to read your bible" books.

It's the quickest way to atheism. When christians actually read the book and realize what's in it they tend to put it down. Forever.

No, in reality exactly the opposite of what you said happens when people read their Bibles. Now you'll lose converts to athiesm when you try to understand string theory or this bubble universe mess, could that be what you meant?

He was talking about how the bible is full of crazy farked up shiat and doesn't make sense or even remain consistent. Most people who read it without a 'this is what the bible REALLY means' study aid notice it.


Oh, OK. Well I'd like to point out that neither of the things you said are true.
 
2012-09-17 07:45:53 PM  

andyfromfl: lewismarktwo: andyfromfl: wildcardjack: fusillade762: The funny part is I tried to sell it at Powell's later (with a bunch of other books) and the buyer there almost laughed at me. Needless to say they didn't want it (it was the only one of the bunch they didn't take).

Hence why they wind up at the thrift stores. Here we have Half Price Books, and they make "offers" on the whole load. What they can't use they actually "donate" to thrift stores for tax credit.

Oh, and go read your bible. By yourself, no handholding versions, no apologetic "how to read your bible" books.

It's the quickest way to atheism. When christians actually read the book and realize what's in it they tend to put it down. Forever.

No, in reality exactly the opposite of what you said happens when people read their Bibles. Now you'll lose converts to athiesm when you try to understand string theory or this bubble universe mess, could that be what you meant?

He was talking about how the bible is full of crazy farked up shiat and doesn't make sense or even remain consistent. Most people who read it without a 'this is what the bible REALLY means' study aid notice it.

Oh, OK. Well I'd like to point out that neither of the things you said are true.


Oh, OK. Well I'd like to point out that you haven't really pointed out anything.
 
2012-09-17 10:41:52 PM  

andyfromfl: anfrind: wildcardjack: Oh, and go read your bible. By yourself, no handholding versions, no apologetic "how to read your bible" books.

It's the quickest way to atheism. When christians actually read the book and realize what's in it they tend to put it down. Forever.

I don't think it's even that hard. My ultra-religious grandparents gave me pretty much every "Superbook" VHS ever created when I was a kid (my parents were not exactly religious people). And even with its heavily-Bowdlerized versions of Bible stories in kid-friendly cartoon form, I remained thoroughly unconverted.

/He-Man > Superbook
//not a He-Man worshipper
///Eve had weird, featureless tits

Hard to argue with your slashies, but I have to say, you watched a cartoon that failed to change your life in a way that contrasted with that of your parents? Hardly shocking.


I don't think "contrasted" is the right word, since religion simply wasn't a part of our lives--it's not like they indoctrinated me as an atheist who believes everything about Christianity is bad. I think it had more to do with the fact that I grew up with Greek myths, science fiction (mostly Star Trek and classic authors such as Heinlein), and the various popular cartoons of the late 80's and early 90's (He-Man, TMNT, etc.), and if you look at the stories from the Bible from that perspective, they just don't hold up well no matter how you present them.
 
Displayed 100 of 100 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report