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(Forbes)   Astronomers discover planets inside a cluster of a thousand stars. The sun is there, and there, and there, and there, and there, and there, and there, and there, and there, and there, and there, and   (forbes.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, planets, star cluster, astronomers, stars  
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2651 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Sep 2012 at 10:20 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2012-09-16 10:29:23 AM  
All of the inhabitants there worship His Shadow.
 
2012-09-16 10:29:58 AM  
"its full of stars"
 
2012-09-16 10:39:07 AM  
good times until that one day when the suns all set:

www.eternalnight.co.uk

/pic hot like the only way to produce light when the madness sets in.
 
2012-09-16 10:44:15 AM  
And in the centre of the stars that amorphous blight of nethermost confusion which blasphemes and bubbles at the center of all infinity-the boundless daemon sultan Azathoth, whose name no lips dare speak aloud, and who gnaws hungrily in inconceivable, unlighted chambers beyond time and space amidst the muffled, maddening beating of vile drums and the thin monotonous whine of accursed flutes.
 
2012-09-16 10:51:11 AM  

Aboleth: And in the centre of the stars that amorphous blight of nethermost confusion which blasphemes and bubbles at the center of all infinity-the boundless daemon sultan Azathoth, whose name no lips dare speak aloud, and who gnaws hungrily in inconceivable, unlighted chambers beyond time and space amidst the muffled, maddening beating of vile drums and the thin monotonous whine of accursed flutes.


IA, dude. IA.
 
2012-09-16 11:02:33 AM  

McGrits: good times until that one day when the suns all set:

[www.eternalnight.co.uk image 180x288]

/pic hot like the only way to produce light when the madness sets in.


Came here for this. Leaving satisfied.
 
2012-09-16 11:34:43 AM  
1000+ stars in an eleven light-year radius. That is insane.

Doubt life could thrive there though, since due to the number of stars, probably a lot of supernova will be happening.
 
2012-09-16 12:05:48 PM  

machoprogrammer: 1000+ stars in an eleven light-year radius. That is insane.

Doubt life could thrive there though, since due to the number of stars, probably a lot of supernova

e will be happening.

Yeah, but if it did, imagine the awesome tan it would get.

/also, pedantically and obnoxiously FTFY
 
2012-09-16 12:06:29 PM  

machoprogrammer: 1000+ stars in an eleven light-year radius. That is insane.

Doubt life could thrive there though, since due to the number of stars, probably a lot of supernova will be happening.


That and the intense gravitic shears.
 
2012-09-16 12:44:44 PM  
I'm curious about the gravitational forces here. Must be some sort of balance to keep the gaseous planets from dissipating or no? I guess since we're only looking at a recent snapshot, any one of a few different scenarios could be playing out. Orbits changing, other planets gone now, planets dissipate and then regroup as the orbits cycle...?
 
2012-09-16 12:59:34 PM  
totalsteelers.com

¡Colmena me gusta!
 
2012-09-16 01:01:56 PM  
Kolob?
 
2012-09-16 01:04:12 PM  

machoprogrammer: 1000+ stars in an eleven light-year radius. That is insane..


Did you ever heard of "star parties"? Stars just want to have fun too!

/ok, ok, I know the real thingie
//amateur star-gazer
///star parties are fun even if the sky is cloudy ... prost!
 
2012-09-16 01:20:44 PM  

machoprogrammer: Doubt life could thrive there though, since due to the number of stars, probably a lot of supernova will be happening.


Not life as we know it.
 
2012-09-16 01:23:13 PM  

Rich Cream: I'm curious about the gravitational forces here. Must be some sort of balance to keep the gaseous planets from dissipating or no? I guess since we're only looking at a recent snapshot, any one of a few different scenarios could be playing out. Orbits changing, other planets gone now, planets dissipate and then regroup as the orbits cycle...?


Well, there are a few things to consider. The first is relative gravity due to proximity, which is key to Sagan's classic argument that the doctor who delivered him is much more gravitationally relevant than Jupiter, which was apparently ascendant at the time: "Jupiter is much bigger; but the doctor was much closer." A star cluster is dense by our reckoning, but these stars aren't extremely close to each other, either. In terms of the gravity function over distance, it's most likely (admitedly, without knowing the particulars that those working on this know) that these worlds are far more gravitationally influenced by their parent suns than by any other 'nearby' stars. Otherwise, as you say, they likely would not exist at all.

TFA doesn't make this clear, or perhaps I missed it, but I believe the assumption that planets would be absent or sparse in dense clusters is due to an assumption that sufficient material to form a planetary disc is unlikely to stick around long enough for planets to form, because stallar activity acts like a powerful wind on such material, scattering it about. So if you have a lot of stars near each other, I guess the thinking is that they'll be constantly blowing away each other's planetary disc matter, so that planets never get a chance to form.

On the other hand, it occurs to me that stars in clusters often form from the same original body of matter, and huge gas giants are essentially failed stars, so perhaps finding this particular kind of planet there isn't that unlikely after all. I guess it depends on exactly how they formed. If they formed as failed stars from the same matter all the other stars did, then I'd personally consider that not so unlikely. (Note that I'm not an astronomer, and not in any way qualified to say such things. So yes, I am talking out of my ass here.) If it's surmised that they formed in the same way ours did, however, from accreting matter in an orbiting planetary disc, then I think that would be more surprising in that particular environment. 

/Phil or Neil, please explain and save me from embarrassing myself further!
 
2012-09-16 02:10:57 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: On the other hand, it occurs to me that stars in clusters often form from the same original body of matter, and huge gas giants are essentially failed stars, so perhaps finding this particular kind of planet there isn't that unlikely after all



Thanks. I thought possibly they were too far apart. The "revolving around a center" had me putting things closer together because for some reason I pictured the stars more like electrons orbiting in spherical forming paths rather than a planetary system which is fairly planar and organized.

/Planartary system.
 
2012-09-16 02:23:11 PM  

Aboleth: And in the centre of the stars that amorphous blight of nethermost confusion which blasphemes and bubbles at the center of all infinity-the boundless daemon sultan Azathoth, whose name no lips dare speak aloud, and who gnaws hungrily in inconceivable, unlighted chambers beyond time and space amidst the muffled, maddening beating of vile drums and the thin monotonous whine of accursed flutes.


Well, duh:

The astronomers discovered these planets by observing stars in the Cluster with the Tillinghast telescope in Arizona.

Named for the noted Dr. Crawford Tillinghast, of course.
 
2012-09-16 02:58:12 PM  

Uisce Beatha: McGrits: good times until that one day when the suns all set:

[www.eternalnight.co.uk image 180x288]

/pic hot like the only way to produce light when the madness sets in.

Came here for this. Leaving satisfied.


Ditto.
 
2012-09-16 04:24:52 PM  

give me doughnuts: Uisce Beatha: McGrits: good times until that one day when the suns all set:

[www.eternalnight.co.uk image 180x288]

/pic hot like the only way to produce light when the madness sets in.

Came here for this. Leaving satisfied.

Ditto.


bestsciencefictionstories.com

You guys posted the wrong reference.
 
2012-09-16 07:43:19 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: loads of stuff.


Being UK born and raised (and, er, spending most of my days on the playground) I never got to see Cosmos, but after reading about it on Fark (probably from your good self) checked it out recently on Youtube. All of it. And it is really wonderful. Sagan, had a real knack for communicating; when you watch him his enthusiasm is so wonderful and he really draws you in. He also loved turtle-necks from what I saw!
 
2012-09-16 09:48:04 PM  
Stars formed in an open cluster are usually far enough away that gravity shouldn't interfere much with planet formation.
 
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