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(io9)   Ten of science fiction's most depressing futuristic retirement scenarios   (io9.com) divider line 56
    More: Scary, How to Survive, Dredd, soylent greens, science fictional, time loops, retirement, Lucy Liu, instructions per second  
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8788 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Sep 2012 at 5:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-15 10:35:27 PM
Living in post-Second Impact Tokyo-3 suspiciously absent from the list.
 
2012-09-15 10:47:12 PM
So when do we get an auto-greened list of i09's most common top ten lists?
 
2012-09-15 10:53:39 PM
Soylent Green? Logan's Run?
 
2012-09-15 10:55:06 PM
For some reason, Sewer Shark popped into my head.
 
2012-09-15 11:13:06 PM
"Whiny biatches."

images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-09-15 11:13:29 PM
ecetopuzlu.files.wordpress.com

Life without the finglonger sadly absent
 
2012-09-15 11:24:27 PM
I was always partial to Heinlein's "I Will Fear No Evil" where the protagonist gets a body donated by his recently murdered hot female secretary.
 
2012-09-15 11:42:08 PM
And then there's immortality, the worst fate of all.

Three dystopian versions:

1) Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels has the Skraelings, who live forever but grow progressively more mentally and physically feeble. They're a bunch of Alzeihemer's victims writ large: crabby, miserable and useless to themselves and others because instead of being repositories of wisdom and historical knowledge, they're just grouches.

2) A Billion Grandmothers. In this short story, the ancestors of the people of a small planet grow progressively older and smaller but do not die. They are kept in the basement, on shelves, like dolls because as they grow older they become progressively less involved with the world. It urns out the planet is basically built up of tiny, tiny grandmothers, an infinite regress of smaller and older ancestors, like dust.

3) The Post Mortal by Drew Magary. In this novel, immortality becomes possible (actually, just as stop to aging and physical decay) which means that 1) the economy collapses; 2) people realize that they haven't got enough savings to retire ... well, this is mostly depressing because it's so accurate. Also, there are "trolls" who make life miserable for the immortals by attacking them and carving the dates of their immortality treatment into their flesh. They kill one of several girlfriends of the main character and also engage in various acts of terrorism. There's even a new religion among the immortals. In short, it's not so much fun as you think to potentially live forever, even with immortal youth and health.
 
2012-09-15 11:47:53 PM

brantgoose: And then there's immortality, the worst fate of all.

Three dystopian versions:

1) Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels has the Skraelings, who live forever but grow progressively more mentally and physically feeble. They're a bunch of Alzeihemer's victims writ large: crabby, miserable and useless to themselves and others because instead of being repositories of wisdom and historical knowledge, they're just grouches.

2) A Billion Grandmothers. In this short story, the ancestors of the people of a small planet grow progressively older and smaller but do not die. They are kept in the basement, on shelves, like dolls because as they grow older they become progressively less involved with the world. It urns out the planet is basically built up of tiny, tiny grandmothers, an infinite regress of smaller and older ancestors, like dust.

3) The Post Mortal by Drew Magary. In this novel, immortality becomes possible (actually, just as stop to aging and physical decay) which means that 1) the economy collapses; 2) people realize that they haven't got enough savings to retire ... well, this is mostly depressing because it's so accurate. Also, there are "trolls" who make life miserable for the immortals by attacking them and carving the dates of their immortality treatment into their flesh. They kill one of several girlfriends of the main character and also engage in various acts of terrorism. There's even a new religion among the immortals. In short, it's not so much fun as you think to potentially live forever, even with immortal youth and health.


Well I never learned to read but there is the Star Trek Voyager episode where one of the Q continuum desired to commit suicide because there was simply nothing left to do or see in the universe,
 
2012-09-16 03:23:10 AM
Depressing isn't it?

As a kid, I grew up watching movies where Native Americans (Indians) cherished and cared for their elderly, considering their wisdom valuable. I also knew of the Eskimos, who allowed their elderly to walk out into the cold, wild environment to die as they chose. I knew of some Indian tribes which did the same. The elders themselves chose their time to die.

My elders were raised taking care of their elders, often in the family home, which pretty often had been built by the elders in their youth. Siblings came and went, staying for weeks at a time to care for Mom and Dad, spelling each other without complaint.

Sometimes, 3 generations would be on the family farm and the elders taken care of and respected. Grandkids and great-grandkids would cherish the company of the old folks, who were delighted to baby sit. Grandpa still had a say in things and so did grandma. The kids might consider some of the stuff bullshiat, but they listened respectfully anyhow even if they did stuff their own way later.

I can't shoe a horse but my great-grandpa could. My grandparents lived on a farm with other family members during the Great Depression and made a lot of their own breads and pasteries from scratch. My Grandpa made his own root beer and sauerkraut. Grandma knew how to can vegetables and meats without poisoning everyone. They knew how to barter for goods.

Sometime in the late 50's I learned about nursing homes, which were supposed to be great places for the elderly. By the 70's scandals and reports of abuse, neglect, theft and profiteering rocked the nursing home world, but people were too busy to care for their elders.

Besides, yuppies were buying BMWs, screwing up the stock market, drinking over priced coffee and making their riches so who had time to fuss with old, worn out, half crazy farts?

By the 80's major, new nursing homes appeared. Assisted living facilities, charging a high price to care for your folks. Other nursing homes started charging around $6000 a month a slapping a lien on the old folks properties so if the family rented the place for a bit of cash, it had to be paid to the home.

In the late 70's I worked in a nursing home as a medical aide, was appalled by the conditions, the smell and the lack of staff and quit the next day. In the 80's I investigated nursing homes to put my aunt in one and found reasonably priced ones made out of buildings built in the early 50's.

Most of the elderly looked brain dead, ready to die. The buildings were old. High end condo's popped up, basically nursing homes with state of the art built in medical care with the look of a nice apartment -- and a fee not for the faint of heart. The well off went to them in droves.

As a courier I delivered to some homes and was always hit by the stink of urine and feces, observed staff for whom the job was just a pay check and saw the elderly laying in beds, just waiting to die. Quite a few had family that stopped in to see them about once a year.

I helped put my aunt, with her permission, in a high end nursing home which was great -- until the original staff changed and the company cut corners. Then we whisked her out when we found she had been threatened, abused, stolen from and harassed, not to mention barely cared for. Being crippled, she could not often get to meals unless someone got her. Often, they just didn't bother feeding her.

We put her in a better place and called in DCF. The entire nursing home crew was fired and replaced and the company threatened with penalties and lawsuits until it cleaned up it's act.

Nursing homes are all over town now, when once there were just 4.

Kids don't want to take care of their elders anymore.

I'm over 50. The blush is off the blossom. I live with and take care of my 85 year old disabled Mom in the family home. I'm on duty 24/7. It took me 5 years to find programs to give us some help. Still, I do everything for her from bathing, to dressing to shopping and making her meals. I handle her medications, check her diabetes, adjust her pills and, since she is incontinent, clean her up.

I have three siblings. My sister wants nothing to do with her, even though money is tight since we're both disabled. So she won't even contribute a few bucks. My younger brother stays away most of the time. He comes when needed, has hired a yard man to take care of the yard and always shows up when I have to put her in the hospital.

However, I'm there alone every night, even when she has panic attacks, hallucinations, get sick and buzzes me. I've not had a full, unbroken nights sleep in years.

My older brother, quite well off, sends her gifts, helps out with some paper work, drops in every few months and calls her but he is the wealthy one of the family -- and hates to part with a dime. He spends most of his time with his wife touring the US in their $100,000 motor home.

When I asked for help, he said to put her in a nursing home. That's not acceptable. She used to work in one and is terrified of them and I promised her she would never be placed in one so long as I had any say. When I pointed out needed repairs that I could not do on the old house, he told me to sell it and move us into an apartment.

The house is paid for. It has grandfathered in low property taxes and she and my Dad built most of it and raised us kids there. It's her HOME.

So, I get to take care of her, which means my own illness, which is mental, never gets cured.

And now I look down the road and see a dim future for myself. Single. Never married. Who will take care of me when I become infirm?

So, for me, when I get too old, I've decided to simply suicide. Why rot away in a nursing home? Why drain every cent I have to stay unpleasantly alive? When the time comes, after my Mother passes on, that I become too infirm, I have a whole plan set up to end it all.

I've had a fantastic life and career. After passing 55 it all basically ended. My last job is taking care of my Mom. I will NOT rot away in a nursing home and I will choose the time of my ending and where. I will not be a lonely old man, getting crazier by the year, having to beg, scrape and borrow money for medications and staying around for what?

I did have fun though in my younger years. I met a great many people and learned a lot. I had adventures.

My Mom had an active life, even after my Dad died in his 40's. Now, most of her friends are dead or don't visit. Her family drops in on holidays and from time to time. She's developed a host of physical problems and has me, the black sheep of the family, that baths and feeds her, combs her hair, does her laundry and gets her dressed in clean cloths, puts her to bed every night and gets her up in the morning.

I have to clean her in places a son should NEVER touch his Mom. I have no social life since I can't leave her alone for long periods and no one will cover for me if I want a day off.

However, she's my Mom. I'll do my job until the end.

Later, I'll decide what to do about me.
 
2012-09-16 05:56:21 AM

brantgoose: And then there's immortality, the worst fate of all.


Sure, it might be fun for a while, but one day the universe is going to collapse and die and then what are you gonna do? Probably get bored at some point then.
 
2012-09-16 06:00:44 AM

Rik01: Depressing isn't it?

As a kid, I grew up watching movies where Native Americans (Indians) cherished and cared for their elderly, considering their wisdom valuable. I also knew of the Eskimos, who allowed their elderly to walk out into the cold, wild environment to die as they chose. I knew of some Indian tribes which did the same. The elders themselves chose their time to die.

My elders were raised taking care of their elders, often in the family home, which pretty often had been built by the elders in their youth. Siblings came and went, staying for weeks at a time to care for Mom and Dad, spelling each other without complaint.

Sometimes, 3 generations would be on the family farm and the elders taken care of and respected. Grandkids and great-grandkids would cherish the company of the old folks, who were delighted to baby sit. Grandpa still had a say in things and so did grandma. The kids might consider some of the stuff bullshiat, but they listened respectfully anyhow even if they did stuff their own way later.

I can't shoe a horse but my great-grandpa could. My grandparents lived on a farm with other family members during the Great Depression and made a lot of their own breads and pasteries from scratch. My Grandpa made his own root beer and sauerkraut. Grandma knew how to can vegetables and meats without poisoning everyone. They knew how to barter for goods.

Sometime in the late 50's I learned about nursing homes, which were supposed to be great places for the elderly. By the 70's scandals and reports of abuse, neglect, theft and profiteering rocked the nursing home world, but people were too busy to care for their elders.

Besides, yuppies were buying BMWs, screwing up the stock market, drinking over priced coffee and making their riches so who had time to fuss with old, worn out, half crazy farts?

By the 80's major, new nursing homes appeared. Assisted living facilities, charging a high price to care for your folks. Other nursing homes started charging a ...


Dear god you even make me want to kill myself. Very, very depressing. But you do bring up a valid point on how American society does not take care of our elderly anymore and do not want to take on the burdens associated with it. It also speaks volumes about how our current health care has not just screwed over the elderly, but their families too, as they have to absord the skyrocketing costs.
 
2012-09-16 06:39:42 AM

Frothy Panties: Dear god you even make me want to kill myself. Very, very depressing. But you do bring up a valid point on how American society does not take care of our elderly anymore and do not want to take on the burdens associated with it.

anyone.

We have been conned into believing we are a nation of bootstrappy individuals that have no need of, nor any responsibility towards each-other. We have forgotten that we are a social species and we absolutely rely on our collective societies to thrive. The idea of mutual interdependence flies in the face of modern America's "I've got mine, fark you!" mindset. And it's slowly destroying this country.
 
2012-09-16 07:04:53 AM
Retirement is a strange artifact of western culture.

The way I see it, old people have a evolutionary use. Even tho they cant breed, they can help to raise children (and human children, because of their long development period, are costly to rear). This gives the parents more time for work and play, resulting in more money and more kids.
An extended family should be able to crank out a dozen healthy adults where a single mother would be lucky to manage one.

The catch is that science is allowing us to live alot longer than our bodies can manage.
The capabilities of an elderly person start to drop off after their seventies, and they can become a cost.
Normally its not a problem in a large family, but fewer wealthy people are having big families these days. Which means fewer hands to help around the house.

Now we park old people in a special retirement home because they've become a nuisance.
I think the reality of today is the most depressing science fiction outcome of them all, and its going to end up looking like Roujin-Z.

/I hope to live just long enough to have the option of being entombed inside a Dreadnought.
/An eternity serving the Emperor in battle sounds alot better than a decade of chess and pudding.
 
2012-09-16 07:34:33 AM
Once upon a time, I read a story in OMNI magazine where the protragonist was a filthy rich, hedonistic bastard. He would party and booze and overindulge, until at a certain point his body was a bloated, uninhabitable carcass. At that point he would have his mind copied, and put into a healthy, fit clone. The process continued apparently for years. The story was actually more about what became of the old body that was being abandoned. As it turned out, it wasn't abandoned. The original mind was still in and functional, with all the memories from before. That body would then be taken to a farm and forced to do physical labor. Upon arrival the newcomer noticed numerous other "inmates" all separted from each other, each with their own personal guard. All of the other inmates were also in various stages of fitness, running from the morbidly obese to work hardened and lean. At the end of the story we find out that all of the inmates and guards are past "originals".
It was a very interesting read, but for the life of me, I can't remember the title or the author. I miss Omni magazine
 
2012-09-16 08:06:03 AM
TFA SPOILS THE UPCOMING SCI-FI MOVIE LOOPER. SERIOUSLY; FARK SUBBY AND IO9.COM AND WHOEVER GREENLIT THIS.
 
2012-09-16 08:25:58 AM

Gunther: TFA SPOILS THE UPCOMING SCI-FI MOVIE LOOPER. SERIOUSLY; FARK SUBBY AND IO9.COM AND WHOEVER GREENLIT THIS.




Gunther, are you new to fark? Haven't you noticed that upcoming movie plots are suddenly news items just before they come out and that fark postings about similar items just happen to spike at that point? This is part of how drew makes his money. That it was going to be greenlit was never in question, merely when it would be greenlit was the question, along with how many other articles about the same thing would be posted on a particular day.
 
2012-09-16 08:45:13 AM
many people are insane.

death is just an extension of that insanity...
 
2012-09-16 08:50:30 AM
No Old Man's War scenarios make the list?

(I'm aware that it wasn't remotely original, but Scalzi is recognizable and I don't feel like making the effort to remember an older version of "send grandpa off with augmentations to fight our wars so no one with more life to live has to die".)

Gunther: TFA SPOILS THE UPCOMING SCI-FI MOVIE LOOPER. SERIOUSLY; FARK SUBBY AND IO9.COM AND WHOEVER GREENLIT THIS.


You know what also spoils the plot of Looper? The 90-second theatrical trailer.

Also the 30-second TV trailer.

And every interview with the producers, director and cast. Yes, all of them.

What I'm getting at here is that the movie doesn't have a plot, it has a 'hook', and they're not particularly ashamed of that fact and aren't insulting their audience by pretending the general shape of the plot is non-obvious.
 
2012-09-16 08:54:50 AM

Mugato:

Well I never learned to read but there is the Star Trek Voyager episode where one of the Q continuum desired to commit suicide because there was simply nothing left to do or see in the universe,


Similarly Godric in the True Blood universe had, after 2000 years, finally seen enough, and wanted to see a sunrise one last time.
 
2012-09-16 09:01:59 AM
Not exactly retirement, but I did enjoy Vault 112 in Fallout 3.
 
2012-09-16 09:05:52 AM

Memoryalpha: Gunther, are you new to fark? Haven't you noticed that upcoming movie plots are suddenly news items just before they come out and that fark postings about similar items just happen to spike at that point?


Yeah, but an article about a movie doesn't necessarily mean spoilers.

Jim_Callahan: You know what also spoils the plot of Looper? The 90-second theatrical trailer.


The trailer sets out the basic concept, it doesn't explain why Bruce Willis has been sent back in time or why JGL has to kill his older self. Which that article spoils.
 
2012-09-16 09:08:37 AM

Gunther: The trailer sets out the basic concept, it doesn't explain why Bruce Willis has been sent back in time or why JGL has to kill his older self. Which that article spoils.


Um, you can't derive the motivation from what's in the trailer?

Your problem may not be spoilers so much as reading comprehension, there.

//I guess "viewing comprehension", maybe? I'm sure there's a term for it.
 
2012-09-16 09:11:40 AM

Jim_Callahan: Um, you can't derive the motivation from what's in the trailer?


At least in the trailer I saw, it wasn't clear that simply being a looper meant that you had to kill your elder self.
 
2012-09-16 09:19:51 AM
Don't mind me, just passing through.

dl.dropbox.com
 
2012-09-16 09:26:28 AM
Also, not really paying attention to the plot, but it sounds backwards.

If the young you kills the future you then you are responsible for your death and all crimes between.
If the old you kills the past you, then no one is responsible for your death. You cease to exist prior to crimes happening..
(but do all of the acts you commit, and the future you, still exist?)

Future assassin against his past self is the setup. The spoiler is in the resolution of who kills who and how it plays out.
 
2012-09-16 10:03:29 AM

brantgoose: And then there's immortality, the worst fate of all.

Three dystopian versions:

1) Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels has the Skraelings, who live forever but grow progressively more mentally and physically feeble. They're a bunch of Alzeihemer's victims writ large: crabby, miserable and useless to themselves and others because instead of being repositories of wisdom and historical knowledge, they're just grouches.

2) A Billion Grandmothers. In this short story, the ancestors of the people of a small planet grow progressively older and smaller but do not die. They are kept in the basement, on shelves, like dolls because as they grow older they become progressively less involved with the world. It urns out the planet is basically built up of tiny, tiny grandmothers, an infinite regress of smaller and older ancestors, like dust.

3) The Post Mortal by Drew Magary. In this novel, immortality becomes possible (actually, just as stop to aging and physical decay) which means that 1) the economy collapses; 2) people realize that they haven't got enough savings to retire ... well, this is mostly depressing because it's so accurate. Also, there are "trolls" who make life miserable for the immortals by attacking them and carving the dates of their immortality treatment into their flesh. They kill one of several girlfriends of the main character and also engage in various acts of terrorism. There's even a new religion among the immortals. In short, it's not so much fun as you think to potentially live forever, even with immortal youth and health.


Actually, #2 is "Nine Hundred Grandmothers" by R.A. Lafferty, just one of this author's works well worth a read (or a re-read).

farm5.staticflickr.com
 
2012-09-16 10:50:17 AM
Well, there is always semi-retirement. You know, working part-time just to keep busy

www.shadowlocked.com
 
2012-09-16 11:07:01 AM

tomWright: Well, there is always semi-retirement. You know, working part-time just to keep busy

[www.shadowlocked.com image 300x200]


/Hears the gentle strains of "Benson, Arizona"
//Too obscure?
 
2012-09-16 11:55:54 AM
I sort of wish all these elderly good Christians would put their faith in God to work, and stop taking their life extending medications and allow that next heart attack to carry them on to God's reward.

I've always thought the Christian fear of death to be silly. You have the faith, right? Then don't fight the reward. Go ahead and die.

Now, if on the other hand you don't really believe, like me, then drop the rest of your Christian act. It's really annoying.
 
2012-09-16 12:53:00 PM

Rik01: Later, I'll decide what to do about me.


I am in a similar situation and am considering heroin. All the heroin.
 
2012-09-16 12:53:52 PM
dating Bender (like Lucy Liu),

FOUL!

Point of Order. It was Fry.

/and you call yourselves geeks
//nobody at that web site caught it either.
//not sure who I'm more ashamed of, all of you, or me
 
2012-09-16 01:02:44 PM
Immortality is a drag? Yeah. That's okay. I'll risk it.

/No idea if I'm in before that guy who is going to troll this thread about money being wasted on space exploration.
//You know which one.
///fark that guy.
 
2012-09-16 01:45:32 PM

wildcardjack: I've always thought the Christian fear of death to be silly.


Methinks you have made one assumption too many. At least one, at any rate.
 
2012-09-16 01:46:28 PM

Rich Cream: dating Bender (like Lucy Liu),

FOUL!

Point of Order. It was Fry.

/and you call yourselves geeks
//nobody at that web site caught it either.
//not sure who I'm more ashamed of, all of you, or me


I haven't seen that ep in a long time, but wasn't it the Lucy-Liu-bot that was dating Fry? The real Lucy Liu's head ended up with Bender.
 
2012-09-16 01:50:47 PM
Is it just me or did most of those scenarios towards the end just focus on old people? Also, no Logan's Run mention?
 
2012-09-16 02:09:56 PM

Rich Cream: dating Bender (like Lucy Liu),

FOUL!

Point of Order. It was Fry.

/and you call yourselves geeks
//nobody at that web site caught it either.
//not sure who I'm more ashamed of, all of you, or me


You're wrong, watch the ep again. Fry dated a Liubot, Bender got the Liu in a jar.
 
2012-09-16 02:12:44 PM

flaminio: I haven't seen that ep in a long time, but wasn't it the Lucy-Liu-bot that was dating Fry? The real Lucy Liu's head ended up with Bender.


JonZoidberg: You're wrong, watch the ep again. Fry dated a Liubot, Bender got the Liu in a jar.



You're both technically correct. The best kind of correct.
 
2012-09-16 03:07:52 PM
You can tell the old people nearing retirement, or retired, by reading this thread.
 
2012-09-16 03:13:59 PM

RockofAges: Bhags: Once upon a time, I read a story in OMNI magazine where the protragonist was a filthy rich, hedonistic bastard. .........It was a very interesting read, but for the life of me, I can't remember the title or the author. I miss Omni magazine

Fat Farm, Orson Scott Card?

Link


YES! Thats the one. Thanks :-)
 
2012-09-16 03:22:36 PM
I remember a short story i read sometime in the 80s where this guy gets frozen because of an uncurable disease. His family tells him they are going to leave his retirement stash in an account so he will have something when he is cured and woken. Only when he does wake up in the distant future, his family is gone and his saving didnt even keep close to inflation. He wakes up not knowing anyone and his savings barely covers lunch.


That and and i'm still waiting for the move adeptation of Alterred Carbon. Tho market forces would be a good one too.
 
2012-09-16 05:01:07 PM

Bhags: RockofAges: Bhags: Once upon a time, I read a story in OMNI magazine where the protragonist was a filthy rich, hedonistic bastard. .........It was a very interesting read, but for the life of me, I can't remember the title or the author. I miss Omni magazine

Fat Farm, Orson Scott Card?

Link

YES! Thats the one. Thanks :-)


Full story is here Link 

(site seems to have fiction from first 100-odd issues of Omni)
 
2012-09-16 05:33:19 PM

Gunther: TFA SPOILS THE UPCOMING SCI-FI MOVIE LOOPER. SERIOUSLY; FARK SUBBY AND IO9.COM AND WHOEVER GREENLIT THIS.


i assume you've not seen any of the commercials where that is already pointed out?
 
2012-09-16 05:43:52 PM
[cries helplessly for Rik01]
 
2012-09-16 06:06:08 PM

Rich Cream: dating Bender (like Lucy Liu),

FOUL!

Point of Order. It was Fry.

/and you call yourselves geeks
//nobody at that web site caught it either.
//not sure who I'm more ashamed of, all of you, or me


Wow, you Rotsky'd yourself, did you forget Bender keeping Liu in his chest after going on the whole "it isn't natural for humans to date robots?"
 
2012-09-16 06:06:46 PM

JonZoidberg: Rich Cream: dating Bender (like Lucy Liu),

FOUL!

Point of Order. It was Fry.

/and you call yourselves geeks
//nobody at that web site caught it either.
//not sure who I'm more ashamed of, all of you, or me

You're wrong, watch the ep again. Fry dated a Liubot, Bender got the Liu in a jar.


I'm pleased that Zoidberg beat me to the punch.
 
2012-09-16 06:27:15 PM

AtlanticCoast63: /Too obscure?


With you, the guy that posted the picture and me, that's at least three of us that know that movie.

/Nothing is obscure on Fark.
 
2012-09-16 06:29:42 PM

Fano: I'm pleased that Zoidberg beat me to the punch.



It's only fitting.

/you too, are technically correct.
 
2012-09-16 08:50:13 PM
Another one: Vonnegut's "Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow," from "Welcome to the Monkey House"

The gist of it is that scientists invented a potion that allows people to resist any further ravages of aging or disease (but not undo any aging that had already occurred). People stopped dying, but kept reproducing, leading to a population boom and housing crisis. Consequently, whole multi-generational families lived cramped in relatively small apartments, fighting for prime sleeping and living space and attempting to curry favor with the eldest member of the family (in whose name the apartment lease usually was and who typically controlled assignment of space). There isn't any plot to speak of; it's just a slice-of-life story. But the idea of having to spend the rest of your life sharing a small apartment with every sibling, in-law, cousin, neice and nephew you had, all under the arbitrary whim of your crotchety grand- or great-grandparent, makes death sound a little more appealing.
 
2012-09-16 09:37:56 PM
 
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