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(Sun Sentinel)   Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson discusses how he doesn't much like the newfangled gadgetry in music, his current tour where he plays Thick as a Brick 1 and 2. Wait, there's a Thick as a Brick 2 now? I don't know how I feel about that   (sun-sentinel.com) divider line 53
    More: Interesting, Jethro Tull, Thick as a Brick, folk rocks, Gibson Les Pauls, bank regulation, electronica, West Palm Beach  
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1064 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 15 Sep 2012 at 11:08 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-15 09:33:01 AM  
Hey! This new fangled technology is allowing me to eye with bad intent wice as many little girls in half the time
 
2012-09-15 10:05:22 AM  
I really don't mind if I sit this one out.
 
2012-09-15 10:15:25 AM  
The argument that you can't use technology in music is bunk. I can make something that's passionate, heartfelt, and completely genuine completely on a computer. I can also make formulaic crap using acoustic instruments recording on analog tape. It's all how you use it.
 
2012-09-15 10:24:03 AM  
Seen Jethro Tull once in concert. He seriously rocked that flute. Very good show and I'd go again.
 
2012-09-15 10:47:42 AM  

Ian Anderson is a blast.

If he comes to your town, let him know where the good Indian restaurants are and you will have yourself a pal.

His guide to Indian food is liberally seasoned with win.

Brave but occasionally foolish forkers, like me, will feel compelled to go for the Phal or Tindaloo, those macho show-off botty-crippling dishes which we become strangely ever-addicted to. Nothing disrupts a band sound-check like the pervasive after-effects of the Tarka Dhal
 

"Botty-crippling" is one of my favorite descriptive phrases ever.
 
2012-09-15 10:48:10 AM  
Pardon, Sir... but you've got a bit of snot running down your nose

jake_lex: The argument that you can't use technology in music is bunk. I can make something that's passionate, heartfelt, and completely genuine completely on a computer. I can also make formulaic crap using acoustic instruments recording on analog tape. It's all how you use it.


And This^
 
2012-09-15 10:52:07 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Pardon, Sir... but you've got a bit of snot running down your nose

jake_lex: The argument that you can't use technology in music is bunk. I can make something that's passionate, heartfelt, and completely genuine completely on a computer. I can also make formulaic crap using acoustic instruments recording on analog tape. It's all how you use it.

And This^


I think it's harder to make impassioned music on a computer than with analog. You can do it, but it just doesn't come through as well.
 
2012-09-15 11:15:24 AM  
I grew up in the 70's having a father that was JT obsessed. And I thank FSM every day for it.
 
2012-09-15 11:20:18 AM  
subby, if you've never actually listened to the TAAB album, then your confusion is understandable. Each side was a single track, TAAB1 and TAAB2, and radios almost never play more than the first 3-5 minutes of TAAB1 (8 if you've got a really good classic rock station). It's awesome to have the whole thing as a single mp3 - 45 minutes straight.

/yeah, I know I might be getting trolled by the headline.
//Don't care. TAAB is one of my all-time faves.
///My new shoes are worn at the hee-ee-ee-ee-ee-ee-eels...
 
2012-09-15 11:20:57 AM  

JeffKochosky: subby, if you've never actually listened to the TAAB album, then your confusion is understandable. Each side was a single track, TAAB1 and TAAB2, and radios almost never play more than the first 3-5 minutes of TAAB1 (8 if you've got a really good classic rock station). It's awesome to have the whole thing as a single mp3 - 45 minutes straight.

/yeah, I know I might be getting trolled by the headline.
//Don't care. TAAB is one of my all-time faves.
///My new shoes are worn at the hee-ee-ee-ee-ee-ee-eels...


No he actually wrote a Thick As A Brick II this year.
 
2012-09-15 11:27:52 AM  
I blame Bob Judas
 
2012-09-15 11:39:44 AM  
Well, Mr. Anderson...
back in mah day we had floots made a old fashun twigs and dirt...not your fancy-shmancy floots wit holes in em!
 
2012-09-15 11:55:58 AM  
... and we couldn't get a white onion, because of the war.

TAAB was the sound track of junior year.
 
2012-09-15 11:57:51 AM  
Where the hell was Biggles when I needed him last Saturday?
 
2012-09-15 12:06:12 PM  
The first album that I ever purchased was Thick as a Brick.
 
2012-09-15 12:10:12 PM  
RADIOHEAD
 
2012-09-15 12:24:01 PM  
Thick as a Brick? That's crescent fresh.
 
2012-09-15 01:12:08 PM  
imageshack.us

My mom was never a big music lover (I got that from my dad) but she did have a small collection of LP's that I would borrow and listen starting around 6 or 7 - Benefit was among them so it's thanks to her that I've been a Tull fan as long as I can remember.
 
2012-09-15 01:13:00 PM  
www.minilps.net
 
2012-09-15 01:17:41 PM  
Off his lawn ... and mine!
 
2012-09-15 01:30:52 PM  

JeffKochosky: subby, if you've never actually listened to the TAAB album, then your confusion is understandable. Each side was a single track, TAAB1 and TAAB2, and radios almost never play more than the first 3-5 minutes of TAAB1 (8 if you've got a really good classic rock station). It's awesome to have the whole thing as a single mp3 - 45 minutes straight.

/yeah, I know I might be getting trolled by the headline.
//Don't care. TAAB is one of my all-time faves.
///My new shoes are worn at the hee-ee-ee-ee-ee-ee-eels...


This says to me that you're unaware that Ian Anderson has released Thick as a Brick 2 recently. Am I misunderstanding you?
 
2012-09-15 01:44:19 PM  
So, where the hell was Biggles when you needed him last Saturday?
 
2012-09-15 01:52:36 PM  

Ceiling Moran: JeffKochosky: subby, if you've never actually listened to the TAAB album, then your confusion is understandable. Each side was a single track, TAAB1 and TAAB2, and radios almost never play more than the first 3-5 minutes of TAAB1 (8 if you've got a really good classic rock station). It's awesome to have the whole thing as a single mp3 - 45 minutes straight.

/yeah, I know I might be getting trolled by the headline.
//Don't care. TAAB is one of my all-time faves.
///My new shoes are worn at the hee-ee-ee-ee-ee-ee-eels...

This says to me that you're unaware that Ian Anderson has released Thick as a Brick 2 recently. Am I misunderstanding you?


I think he has no clue there's a second album...
 
2012-09-15 01:58:52 PM  
I didn't either, will have to check it out now.
 
2012-09-15 02:10:11 PM  
I survived HS with Tull. (hard to do when Led Zep, Madonna and VH were all anyone cared about.)

I KNEW if I hung on long enough Anderson would become cool again. But now I don't give a shiat.

So great there is newfound interest there. He is a true talent.

And yes, there is a TAAB II. As if the world needed another one.
 
2012-09-15 02:21:12 PM  
I haven't heard TAAB 2 yet.

Is it worth listening to for a JT fan?
 
2012-09-15 02:50:46 PM  
Hopefully changing world won't make him suicidal and he won't shoot himself with an arrow
 
2012-09-15 02:59:58 PM  
I, like many, didn't know until seeing this article that Ian Anderson had released Thick as a Brick 2.

I also don't know how I feel about that. I love Thick as a Brick. Could a sequel be worth listening to? Sequels of any type usually don't turn out as well as the original work.
 
2012-09-15 03:22:16 PM  
 
2012-09-15 03:23:22 PM  
TAAB2's page at progarchives.com. Reviews are mixed but generally positive.
 
2012-09-15 03:24:05 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: I, like many, didn't know until seeing this article that Ian Anderson had released Thick as a Brick 2.

I also don't know how I feel about that. I love Thick as a Brick. Could a sequel be worth listening to? Sequels of any type usually don't turn out as well as the original work.


I'm not going to. His voice was ruined a few years ago by cancer. That alone makes me not want to listen to anything new. And for artists that have been performing this long, the writing is rarely up to the same standards as it used to be.
 
2012-09-15 03:33:51 PM  
When new technology comes out and the old guard turns up its nose at it, it always comes across as if it's because they don't understand it and are scared of it. Of course they try to play it off like it's because the old way is better.

I'd prefer if they said what, in my opinion, is probably closest to the truth: the Ian Anderson's of the world would have been willing to embrace all sorts of the new technologies, if they had them when they were at their creative peak. If your creative days are behind you, it makes complete sense that the possibilities offered by new tech means nothing to you.
 
2012-09-15 04:24:46 PM  
I'll just leave this here:

img.noiset.com
 
2012-09-15 04:33:13 PM  

Birnone: When new technology comes out and the old guard turns up its nose at it, it always comes across as if it's because they don't understand it and are scared of it. Of course they try to play it off like it's because the old way is better.


One of the weird things about Prog rockers is that they didn't tend to embrace new technology at the time (ie, when syths came in in the late 60s early 70s) while other bands did. It's one of the reasons that Queen tends to be classified as "Prog" as they stuck to their "no synths!" rule for their first five or six albums, and only broke it when it became clear where popular music was headed.
 
2012-09-15 04:59:32 PM  
Thanks for the heads-up on TAAB2...just DL'ed it and listening now.
 
2012-09-15 06:07:03 PM  

whatshisname: I'll just leave this here:

[img.noiset.com image 300x300]


Heh, that album might be why he turned away from the newfangled gadgetry. I am a huge Jethro Tull fan, easily one of my top three bands. "We used to know" snaps quickly into my mind when someone asks what my favorite songs are. That said, my god is "A" an absolutely awful album.
 
2012-09-15 08:11:48 PM  

Dwight_Yeast: One of the weird things about Prog rockers is that they didn't tend to embrace new technology at the time


You wanna maybe run that one by Robert Fripp? I think he'd disagree.
 
2012-09-15 08:18:14 PM  
Tickets for this tour went on pre-order in early spring (Our tickets are postmarked March 20th) for the November 1st show in Milwaukee. That's a hell of a long wait for a show. I'm beyond antsy. I haven't bought TAAB II because I want it to be a surprise, but I've been tempted more than once.

I do disagree with GAT_00 saying that he wouldn't even listen to Ian because "His voice was ruined a few years ago by cancer."

I've seen a bunch of artists past their prime and enjoyed the ones that still play w/ passion much more than bands that just play the same songs note-for-note. Gordon Lightfoot's voice has been shot for years, but he still enjoys playing and puts on a great show. Dick Contino, at 82, struggles to pick up his accordion, but still puts on 2 fun shows per day during Festa Italina every year. True, he no longer plays "Flight of the Bumblebee" to show off his prowess, but I still go every year to see him. 

I can't wait to see this. I saw his "Evening of acoustic songs, music, and bawdy tales" a few years back and had a blast. Tull songs played with a small orchestra was incredible.
 
2012-09-15 08:19:43 PM  
Yup, there's a TAAB 2 now. Ian released it earlier this year as a solo album.


This is the review I wrote of it on my site:


"By any reasonable standard, making a sequel to Thick as a Brick 40 years later was a bad idea, and it's such a blatantly bad idea that I initially assumed the announcement of its impending release was some weird kind of hoax. Right or wrong, it's impossible to pull this album from the towering shadow of its predecessor, even if that was a Jethro Tull album and this one is Ian Anderson solo (there's no Martin Barre here); is there anybody who would purchase this album who wouldn't already know Thick as a Brick basically inside and out? If this album strongly hearkened back to the original, then it would be far too easy to criticize Ian for milking the ideas and themes of the original as a substitute for creating anything new; if the album didn't strongly hearken back to the original, then it would be easy to criticize Ian for using the name and reputation of the original as a cheap way to get people to listen to his new solo album. Furthermore, if the quality of the album was too far below the quality of the original (there was no way this could even be 80% of the original; the key was to keep it from being 50% or worse), there was the chance that this might spoil people's attitudes towards the original like the Star Wars prequels spoiled the original trilogy for lots of people.

On the plus side, Ian had to know all of this himself, and this is probably the reason this album didn't happen sooner (people had been pestering him for years, but it wasn't until a conversation with Derek Shulman, formerly of Gentle Giant fame, that he was persuaded to give it a go). On this album, Ian does his very best to walk the tightrope inherent in the project, and quite honestly the final product is about as good as it was probably going to get. Within the flawed framework, there is a reasonable amount of *wink*/*nod* references to the original; enough to justify the connection to the original, but not so many that they become too obnoxious. Surrounding these references are a good mix of (a) nods to the kind of general approach Ian took to writing music in the 70s (for better or worse) and (b) the kind of music Ian would have been writing anyway in 2012 if he wasn't doing this project. There are some ridiculous cheese moments that come from the nods to the past (like the ending nod to the original that ends with, "And your wise men don't know how it feels to be thick as a brick ... 2"), but there are nice ones as well, like the opening sounds that hearken back to the side 1 end/side 2 beginning from the predecessor, or the menacing alteration of a familiar theme at the beginning of "Old School Song." Plus, it's really nice at a gut level to hear Ian writing songs around the same kinds of instrumentation that he would have used way back when.

The concept of the album centers around Gerald Bostock, concerning 5 possible paths his life could have taken and imagining the consequences, before going off into various philosophical tie-ins about these possible lives. The different lives each span multiple tracks, but the multiple tracks in each life are best listened to in groups (this is how I ripped them for iPod listening). From the introductory tracks that set the scene (a pleasant nostalgic jaunt that moves into enjoyable instrumental passages before resolving in a slightly silly spoken passage), we see these paths in the groups "Gerald the Banker," "Gerald Goes Homeless," "Gerald the Military Man," "Gerald the Chorister" and "Gerald: A Most Ordinary Man." If I had to target one of these as having the best music, it would probably be "Gerald the Banker," as the "Banker Bets, Banker Wins" track has some great angry stretches. Unfortunately, a lot of the lyrics in this section are a little eye-rolling; these might sound better 40 years down the road, but I'm not really counting on it. If lyrics and music are considered together, I'd pick the "Gerald the Military Man" group, consisting of "Old School Song" (which, as mentioned, is in the same style of march as the most famous one on TAAB, and would probably have been a highly regarded outtake had it been recorded then) and "Wootton Bassett," which basically sounds exactly like older Tull with slightly updated keyboard patches (with a melodic reprise of "Banker Bets"). The other groups all have their good and bad sides, but they're enjoyable in aggregate.

The album kinda loses steam for me in the last twenty minutes, though, once we're done speculating on Gerald's life paths. There's nothing especially wrong with "A Change of Horses" (other than being a mildly pleasant excursion into latter-day flute/guitar dialogues that should not last 8 minutes) or the "Confessional"/"Kismet in Suburbia" combo or the closing "What-ifs, Maybes and Might-Have-Beens," and I'd be willing to listen to them individually again from time to time, but when put in a row they make me feel a little sleepy and distracted. Ian makes a good stab at tying everything back together and recovering the momentum in the last track, but by then it's a little too late.

In the end, while I wouldn't recommend this album to anybody who doesn't already love Thick as a Brick, this gets a more hearty recommendation to Thick as a Brick lovers than I originally feared I could give. I'd be perfectly happy if it didn't exist, and I'll continue to seek out the original about ten times as often as I'll seek out this one, but it could be a lot worse."
 
2012-09-15 08:20:42 PM  

jake_lex: The argument that you can't use technology in music is bunk. I can make something that's passionate, heartfelt, and completely genuine completely on a computer. I can also make formulaic crap using acoustic instruments recording on analog tape. It's all how you use it.


you're really missing the point Mr. Anderson is making. and yes, your statement is valid.
 
2012-09-15 08:27:19 PM  

Dancin_In_Anson: So, where the hell was Biggles when you needed him last Saturday?


Why do people keep asking that?

Seriously, though - how did I miss that TAAB2 came out? I'm taking a listen now and it's not bad...
 
2012-09-15 09:37:36 PM  
So why did he ruin Steel Monkey with synthdrums?
Saw em a coupla times eons ago. great shows,
 
2012-09-15 11:35:59 PM  
I gave it a listen. The best bits are the samples from the original album.
I think I'll forget I ever heard it.
 
2012-09-16 01:05:26 AM  

Where the hell was Biggles: I'm taking a listen now and it's not bad...


Thanks for the review. My brother brought home Thick as a Brick hot off the press on vinyl. I'm sure he still has it. It's been a fav for a long time. I'll give the new one a listen.
 
2012-09-16 01:21:12 AM  

tarkus1980: The concept of the album centers around Gerald Bostock, concerning 5 possible paths his life could have taken and imagining the consequences, before going off into various philosophical tie-ins about these possible lives. The different lives each span multiple tracks, but the multiple tracks in each life are best listened to in groups (this is how I ripped them for iPod listening). From the introductory tracks that set the scene (a pleasant nostalgic jaunt that moves into enjoyable instrumental passages before resolving in a slightly silly spoken passage), we see these paths in the groups "Gerald the Banker," "Gerald Goes Homeless," "Gerald the Military Man," "Gerald the Chorister" and "Gerald: A Most Ordinary Man." If I had to target one of these as having the best music, it would probably be "Gerald the Banker," as the "Banker Bets, Banker Wins" track has some great angry stretches. Unfortunately, a lot of the lyrics in this section are a little eye-rolling; these might sound better 40 years down the road, but I'm not really counting on it. If lyrics and music are considered together, I'd pick the "Gerald the Military Man" group, consisting of "Old School Song" (which, as mentioned, is in the same style of march as the most famous one on TAAB, and would probably have been a highly regarded outtake had it been recorded then) and "Wootton Bassett," which basically sounds exactly like older Tull with slightly updated keyboard patches (with a melodic reprise of "Banker Bets"). The other groups all have their good and bad sides, but they're enjoyable in aggregate.


Sounds a lot of the Kinks' Arthur, or: The Decline and Fall of the British Empire, which follows one ordinary man through the first part of the twentieth century.
 
2012-09-16 02:03:20 AM  
The old Robocop actually looked like a robot. This just looks like a guy in body armour.
 
2012-09-16 02:44:27 AM  
The 3 best frontmen I've seen in concert (and, being 54, I've seen a lot)

3) Rob Zombie
2) David Crosby
1) Ian Anderson

All 3 really know how to work a crowd. Rob was a surprise because I never liked his music, I went to the show for the opening act (Lacuna Coil). It was amazing to stand in a crowd, not liking the music, but loving the frontman.
 
2012-09-16 03:24:14 AM  
Gulper Eel [TotalFark]




Dwight_Yeast: One of the weird things about Prog rockers is that they didn't tend to embrace new technology at the time

You wanna maybe run that one by Robert Fripp? I think he'd disagree.


Heck, ELP was AHEAD of the time.
Carl Palmer had electric drums in concert (specially made) 7 to 10 years before they became popular in the 80's
 
2012-09-16 01:06:10 PM  

Third_Uncle_Eno: Heck, ELP was AHEAD of the time.
Carl Palmer had electric drums in concert (specially made) 7 to 10 years before they became popular in the 80's


... and Keith Emerson was still humping a Hammond organ. Emerson's wiki page makes for an interesting read as to why touring bands in the 70s weren't quick to embrace new technology: it didn't travel well. Early Moogs were extremely temperamental, didn't like to be moved, and went out of tune when the temperature changed. In addition, you could only play one note at a time, so they lacked the flexibility of later synths which had keyboard imputs.
 
2012-09-17 07:37:34 AM  
What the hell, figured I'd make it an even 50 comments.

/thanks Ian
 
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