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(Gizmodo)   How do you make water boil without bubbles? Superheated steel balls. Superman unavailable for comment   (gizmodo.com) divider line 18
    More: Cool, nanoparticles, vapor  
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4433 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Sep 2012 at 2:20 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-09-14 12:07:31 PM  
www.3drealms.com
 
2012-09-14 12:26:44 PM  
If my balls were superheated, I'd also be unable to say anything articulate.
 
2012-09-14 02:30:13 PM  
Link with lack of video makes I am super disappoint.
 
2012-09-14 02:35:15 PM  
I would love to see a superheated steel ball.... well it wouldnt be a ball though, wouldnt it probably be liquid?
 
2012-09-14 02:35:31 PM  
scottydoesntknow

I've got b-b-b-b-b-bballs of steel.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IE3KdcTgrno
 
2012-09-14 02:35:37 PM  
 
2012-09-14 02:47:30 PM  
So what you're telling me is I can now fill my brew pot to the very top and not worry about it boiling over? I mean, accounting for the heat expansion as the temperature rises, that is.
 
2012-09-14 02:55:19 PM  
Without tracking down the source material...

I'm thinking that you aren't making the water actually boil. It sounds like instead, you are super heating the water immediately around the balls, turning them into a gas pocket that hangs out around the steel; this in turn shields the remaining water from rising to a temperature that would boil, and therefore bubble... Without additional info or a video.... hard to say.

Why did this get greened without a video?
 
2012-09-14 02:56:38 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: Without tracking down the source material...

I'm thinking that you aren't making the water actually boil. It sounds like instead, you are super heating the water immediately around the balls, turning them into a gas pocket that hangs out around the steel; this in turn shields the remaining water from rising to a temperature that would boil, and therefore bubble... Without additional info or a video.... hard to say.

Why did this get greened without a video?


FTA comments:

""scientists discover..." This same feat can be achieved with an ordinary iron ball, no high-tech, revolutionary nano-particles required. In fact, my high school physics 1 class replicated this experiment in a window of 5 minutes with just a bunsen burner. And since air is a relatively good insulator, the temperature of the surrounding water is barely raised at all, meaning that any practical uses (such as water boiling without bubbling up) are utter nonsense.
By definition, boiling is when any liquid begins to change it's state to vapor. The concept that anything could boil without releasing vapor (Bubbles) is impossible.
I appreciate the attempt to inspire excitement about very interesting physics, but this sensationalist and largely incorrect article truly is an abomination."
 
2012-09-14 03:53:31 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: SmellsLikePoo: Without tracking down the source material...

I'm thinking that you aren't making the water actually boil. It sounds like instead, you are super heating the water immediately around the balls, turning them into a gas pocket that hangs out around the steel; this in turn shields the remaining water from rising to a temperature that would boil, and therefore bubble... Without additional info or a video.... hard to say.

Why did this get greened without a video?

FTA comments:

""scientists discover..." This same feat can be achieved with an ordinary iron ball, no high-tech, revolutionary nano-particles required. In fact, my high school physics 1 class replicated this experiment in a window of 5 minutes with just a bunsen burner. And since air is a relatively good insulator, the temperature of the surrounding water is barely raised at all, meaning that any practical uses (such as water boiling without bubbling up) are utter nonsense.
By definition, boiling is when any liquid begins to change it's state to vapor. The concept that anything could boil without releasing vapor (Bubbles) is impossible.
I appreciate the attempt to inspire excitement about very interesting physics, but this sensationalist and largely incorrect article truly is an abomination."


It's a Gawker link; why we keep getting greens to them is anyone's guess.
 
2012-09-14 04:03:12 PM  
Or just take a very clean pyrex cup and put it in the microwave. Tada superheated water.

/warning stuff will basically blow up at you if you put anything in it.
 
2012-09-14 04:30:27 PM  
FTFNSA: if hot water can be kept away from the material long enough, the team hypothesised, the vapour might stay in place past when the material cools to the boiling point of water, and there is no more explosion risk.

To test this, the team covered steel balls in a nanoparticle-based coating that gave them a rough texture (Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature11418). They heated the balls to 400 °C and submerged them in hot water.

Rather than bubbling against the scorching metal, water droplets stretched across the grooves in the rough coating and cavities beneath them filled with vapour. This kept the surrounding water undisturbed as the temperature of the balls fell all the way to 100 °C


Science teacher guy, your skepticism is well-intentioned but misplaced. Yes TFGA is terrible, & Giz's 'journalist' prob didn't read the whole source before rehashing it. But the point is to create a sheath of steam that avoids violent cavitation by slowing the heat transfer rate (b/c as vapor envelops the balls it prevents big patches of sustained direct contact btwn water & metal which would lead to nucleation of large bubbles; instead the conductive heat transfer through a steam layer is gradual and gentle.). That does seem to be fairly novel. I'll grant none of the headlines communicate that.
 
2012-09-14 05:56:44 PM  
This was published in Nature? Proves once again that I have no idea what is "Nature worthy".
 
2012-09-14 07:18:33 PM  
One can accomplish boiling water with no heat....

But it does require a vacuum source and a container that won't collapse with a vacuum applied.
 
2012-09-14 10:31:19 PM  

xenomorpheus: One can accomplish boiling water with no heat....

But it does require a vacuum source and a container that won't collapse with a vacuum applied.


Ambient heat is still heat.
 
2012-09-15 01:17:16 AM  
Ummm....those sure as hell look like bubbles to me. Picture fail, or article fail?

img.gawkerassets.com
 
2012-09-15 04:24:44 AM  
Emposter: Ummm....those sure as hell look like bubbles to me. Picture fail, or article fail?

I think the left shot is showing the sphere around the ball. That bubble you see from the top is not from the heat of the water, but is from the metal ball itself dropping into the water and taking some air down with it.

The shot at the right is, I assume, after the ball has cooled off.
 
2012-09-15 09:43:22 AM  
I think the shot at left is the sphere with the new surface treatment, and the one on the right is conventionally treated. But since Nature has started truncating even their supplemental-materials captions for non-subscribers, it's hard to say.
 
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