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(MIT Technology Review)   Room temperature superconductivity found. Still no cure for cancer   (technologyreview.com) divider line 98
    More: Cool, superconductivity, room temperatures, Room temperature superconductivity, carbon, oxides, electrical conductivity, physical changes, physicists  
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8065 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Sep 2012 at 5:45 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-13 04:49:21 PM  
one step closer to skynet.
 
2012-09-13 04:52:42 PM  
media.tumblr.com
 
2012-09-13 04:54:25 PM  
Wet pencils are super-conductors?
 
2012-09-13 05:26:43 PM  
TFA: the implications and rewards are potentially huge...

That's putting it mildly. This is definitely a step closer for sure.
 
2012-09-13 05:49:51 PM  
When do they try it with buckyballs?
 
2012-09-13 05:52:09 PM  
Physicists will want to see evidence of zero conductivity and the Meissner effect in these particles

To be a superconductor you need to have zero ability to conduct a current?
 
2012-09-13 05:53:54 PM  

Saiga410: Physicists will want to see evidence of zero conductivity and the Meissner effect in these particles

To be a superconductor you need to have zero ability to conduct a current?


He probably wanted an 'ohm' in there somewhere
 
2012-09-13 05:54:06 PM  
All you have to do is put the graphite through an E-Cat and voila!
 
2012-09-13 06:09:55 PM  
If true this is awesome. One of the problems with superconductivity is the theory is so lacking that you basically have to just hunt in the dark looking for new materials that might work.
 
2012-09-13 06:12:14 PM  
This uh... this may be one of those rare things that out-classes the cure for cancer, subby.
 
2012-09-13 06:13:45 PM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: When do they try it with buckyballs?


Man, I was gonna make a joke about Buckyballs being banned in America, but the farking scientists had to be from Germany.
 
2012-09-13 06:17:44 PM  
Good thing that they aren't cancer researchers, eh, subby?
 
2012-09-13 06:18:05 PM  

LordJiro: Vlad_the_Inaner: When do they try it with buckyballs?

Man, I was gonna make a joke about Buckyballs being banned in America, but the farking scientists had to be from Germany.


Yeah, I thought of the toy just after I hit Add comment. I should have said buckminsterfullerene.

/$180 a gram on the net
 
2012-09-13 06:20:26 PM  
Michael Tilson Thomas is a super conductor, and Davies Symphony Hall is rarely above 295K.

I think skinny big nosed gay musical prodigies will be the next big thing in physics.
 
2012-09-13 06:28:47 PM  
This looks like the next cold fusion.

/boundary interfaces are funny things
//not THAT funny though
 
2012-09-13 06:44:42 PM  
If this is true, we could now make easily pourable graphene circuits that could outperform gold circuits at an infinitesimally small cost.

If we were to get in to hovering vehicles, we could hover our cars just as a frog in a superconductor's EM field floats around, with the only difficulty being power requirements, but once a superconductor starts its magic, it takes relatively little energy to keep it up.

We could explore the fusion problem further by utilizing a cheap electromagnetic bubble for the tokamak, enabling us to sustain it longer which could lead us to actually extracting energy from it.

IF this is true.
 
2012-09-13 07:06:07 PM  
I'm going to call BS on this now
 
2012-09-13 07:06:24 PM  
Room temperature? Then why the 'cool' tag?
 
2012-09-13 07:09:09 PM  
I don't know what this is all about, so I looked it up on Wiki:

The electrical resistivity of a metallic conductor decreases gradually as temperature is lowered. In ordinary conductors, such as copper or silver, this decrease is limited by impurities and other defects. Even near absolute zero, a real sample of a normal conductor shows some resistance. In a superconductor, the resistance drops abruptly to zero when the material is cooled below its critical temperature. An electric current flowing in a loop of superconducting wire can persist indefinitely with no power source.[1]

In 1986, it was discovered that some cuprate-perovskite ceramic materials have a critical temperature above 90 K (−183 °C).[2] Such a high transition temperature is theoretically impossible for a conventional superconductor, leading the materials to be termed high-temperature superconductors. Liquid nitrogen boils at 77 K, facilitating many experiments and applications that are less practical at lower temperatures. In conventional superconductors, electrons are held together in pairs by an attraction mediated by lattice phonons. The best available model of high-temperature superconductivity is still somewhat crude. There is a hypothesis that electron pairing in high-temperature superconductors is mediated by short-range spin waves known as paramagnons.[3]


Still, I am vexed.
 
2012-09-13 07:21:07 PM  
Time for someone to come in and point out that we should be researching immortality rather defy the laws of material science, or something.
 
2012-09-13 07:24:40 PM  
This looks like the next cold fusion.

except they went the correct route and got their work peer reviewed and properly published before saying anything and are not promising more than the research delivers.
 
2012-09-13 07:32:30 PM  

AdolfOliverPanties: I don't know what this is all about, so I looked it up on Wiki:

The electrical resistivity of a metallic conductor decreases gradually as temperature is lowered. In ordinary conductors, such as copper or silver, this decrease is limited by impurities and other defects. Even near absolute zero, a real sample of a normal conductor shows some resistance. In a superconductor, the resistance drops abruptly to zero when the material is cooled below its critical temperature. An electric current flowing in a loop of superconducting wire can persist indefinitely with no power source.[1]

In 1986, it was discovered that some cuprate-perovskite ceramic materials have a critical temperature above 90 K (−183 °C).[2] Such a high transition temperature is theoretically impossible for a conventional superconductor, leading the materials to be termed high-temperature superconductors. Liquid nitrogen boils at 77 K, facilitating many experiments and applications that are less practical at lower temperatures. In conventional superconductors, electrons are held together in pairs by an attraction mediated by lattice phonons. The best available model of high-temperature superconductivity is still somewhat crude. There is a hypothesis that electron pairing in high-temperature superconductors is mediated by short-range spin waves known as paramagnons.[3]

Still, I am vexed.


To keep it simple, most conductors have some resistance - the gold/silver in your quote. Superconductors have zero resistance; I.e. an electron in a superconductor just keeps going. But, they usually have to be really cold - like liquid He temps. A "high temp" superconductor works at liquid nitrogen temps (70 deg higher). This stuff, from he article, works at 300 K, about 230 deg up from the high temp superconductors.

It's a big deal.
 
2012-09-13 07:48:05 PM  

ChubbyTiger: It's a big deal.


Huge, because 300 Kelvin is about 80 Fahrenheit. It literally is room temperature. It's a super conductor that could function without any external cooling at all in many locations. Past discussion of potential room temp superconductors required the room to be in Antarctica in July.
 
2012-09-13 07:49:27 PM  

NotARocketScientist: except they went the correct route and got their work peer reviewed and properly published before saying anything and are not promising more than the research delivers.


Plus there's nothing that leaps out as dubious. Graphite is a well known conductor, certain materials can exhibit unexpected properties at a small scale and so on. What I'd love to know is what drove them to try this.
 
2012-09-13 07:49:28 PM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: When do they try it with buckyballs?


Never, because no one calls them buckyballs.

They're Gygaxions.
 
2012-09-13 07:55:35 PM  

doglover: Vlad_the_Inaner: When do they try it with buckyballs?

Never, because no one calls them buckyballs.

They're Gygaxions.


I heard this in Professor Farnsworth's voice.
 
2012-09-13 08:16:43 PM  

OnlyM3: I'm going to call BS on this now


Why? Just to be Mr. Naysayer?

It could be a perfectly true phenomenon in the scenario described, and also be totally inapplicable to real-world use. It wouldn't be the first time.
 
2012-09-13 08:31:59 PM  

Mr. Eugenides: ChubbyTiger: It's a big deal.

Huge, because 300 Kelvin is about 80 Fahrenheit. It literally is room temperature. It's a super conductor that could function without any external cooling at all in many locations. Past discussion of potential room temp superconductors required the room to be in Antarctica in July.


I've heard that the amount of electricity lost in transmission due to resistance is huge. Supeconductive power transmission lines would make a big difference in our use of fossil fuels, not to mention nuclear power. Imagine being able to idle numerous power plants because transmission losses were reduced to nearly nothing.

/It's a big deal.
 
2012-09-13 08:32:45 PM  
What about room temperature fire? Or Can-o-man (in sandalwood and potpourri).
 
2012-09-13 08:36:42 PM  
I love trains.
 
2012-09-13 08:39:54 PM  
You cure the cancer with the superconductors duh
 
2012-09-13 08:41:58 PM  
At this point it's firmly in the realm of lab curiosity, but here's hoping that its got legs.

/seriously, if this goes somewhere, you will have your flying car.
 
2012-09-13 08:42:39 PM  

Snuffybud: I've heard that the amount of electricity lost in transmission due to resistance is huge.


Depending on the distance, voltage etc etc between the source of the electricity and the end user you can lose over 10% of the power.
 
2012-09-13 08:45:29 PM  
My sum total of experience with superconductors was one semester of undergrad research like 20 years ago (Y-Cu and... Barium maybe?)

Still smells like BS to me....


/secretly hopes it's not.
 
2012-09-13 08:50:44 PM  
Power transmission is just the icing on the cake. The thermal and magnetic properties of superconductors are so weird that they can only be described as alien or otherworldly. I recall reading that one of the implications of perfect conductivity is that the entire material is always the same temperature. Imagine a mesh suit of superconductor with a filament embedded in a suitable heat sink.Firefighters could walk into the middle of a blazing inferno without ever breaking a sweat.You could keep all the processors in a building at liquid helium temps using the same technology. And that's not even brushing the possibilities of uber-powerful magnets.

Room temperature superconductors are a serious technology boner.
 
2012-09-13 08:51:08 PM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: When do they try it with buckyballs?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckminsterfullerene#Band_structure_and_ s uperconductivity
 
2012-09-13 08:55:20 PM  
"Superconductivity" is my favourite Rush song. What?
 
2012-09-13 08:56:13 PM  
Even I know this would be the scientific break-through for the ages.

What could be done with cheap, room temperature superconductors is mind-boggling.

An aside: I just re-read a Heinlein story about a guy who invented VERY cheap photo electric cells that could be tuned to any wave length.

He was getting shiate from the powers that be and solved his problem by letting EVERYONE have the process and charging them a tiny licensing fee.
 
2012-09-13 09:02:38 PM  
dl.dropbox.com

I prefer this method for getting my superconductive materials.

/Still working out the giant blue alien sex slave thing.
 
2012-09-13 09:04:41 PM  

WhyteRaven74: Snuffybud: I've heard that the amount of electricity lost in transmission due to resistance is huge.

Depending on the distance, voltage etc etc between the source of the electricity and the end user you can lose over 10% of the power.


I had heard that it was even more than that, but that's this old fossilized brain trying to remember stuff from 30 years ago. I was under the impression that losses were in the 25% to 30% range, but I've got no facts or citations to support that. Even a 10% gain in transmission would be a major drop in fuel usage.
 
2012-09-13 09:05:16 PM  
Really hope it pans out. Would pretty much change everything.
 
2012-09-13 09:08:11 PM  

Mikey1969: Good thing that they aren't cancer researchers, eh, subby?


Actually, I think their method will also cure cancer: Soak in water, then dry at 100C overnight.
 
2012-09-13 09:18:28 PM  
I stopped reading at Esqinazi.
 
2012-09-13 09:18:41 PM  

Fizpez: My sum total of experience with superconductors was one semester of undergrad research like 20 years ago (Y-Cu and... Barium maybe?)

Still smells like BS to me....


/secretly hopes it's not.


YBCO. It's fun to stay there.
 
2012-09-13 09:22:04 PM  
Also, I don't understand "smells like BS". I'm pretty sure it takes decades of hard work and a fair amount of brains to develop an intuition about such things. Then again, probably most folks are smarter than me.
 
2012-09-13 09:26:20 PM  

ProfessorOhki: Really hope it pans out. Would pretty much change everything.


To start, my lab could save $4k a year on liquid helium. :-)
 
2012-09-13 09:30:10 PM  

ChubbyTiger: ProfessorOhki: Really hope it pans out. Would pretty much change everything.

To start, my lab could save $4k a year on liquid helium. :-)


...Or You could use a voice changer to sound like a chipmunk and save all that money now.
 
2012-09-13 09:36:40 PM  
Interesting.
 
2012-09-13 09:43:46 PM  

Meatybrain: Michael Tilson Thomas is a super conductor, and Davies Symphony Hall is rarely above 295K.

I think skinny big nosed gay musical prodigies will be the next big thing in physics.


All right, I'll give you a...

< seedidthere.jpg >

... if only for the effort and good taste.
 
2012-09-13 09:50:07 PM  
Carbon again? I say we just forget about all the other elements. Carbon is the best at everything.
 
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