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(InfoWorld)   The 12 most dreaded help desk requests   (infoworld.com) divider line 337
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17197 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Sep 2012 at 2:26 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-13 05:20:07 PM  

SirTanon: ...and when they call you back every week or two because they forgot it/lost it, what then? Still cool after the 10th time? Or do you get a little impatient?


I only have a few that are like this, and usually someone has helped them by this time to not forget it. Otherwise, I just tell them to add a number at the end, write down just the number on a post-it, and don't re-use numbers until they get all the way to 9. Works pretty well.
 
2012-09-13 05:20:16 PM  

AdolfOliverPanties: Several times a week. And they almost always call their computer Bob. What the fark?


You don't keep track of users and the MAC address of their machine?
 
2012-09-13 05:20:41 PM  
The users I hate most are the ones who have a family member in IT.

"Well, my husband said you need to do this, have you done that?"

or

"My husband was in here yesterday and I was going to have him install a new video card in my computer. My log in wouldn't allow him to install it, so can you make it so my login will allow it?"
 
2012-09-13 05:25:31 PM  

flaminio: kid_icarus: I can't believe they left out the most beloved line of all,

I'm not very computer illiterate...

...back in my help desk days, that line was uttered at least 500 times a day, made all the more maddening in that they seemed unaware they were stating the opposite of what they meant, but they all said it like that.

Yeah, the "I'm not a computer person" line always sets me off. The computer is a tool that you use for your job. Can you imagine a carpenter saying "I'm not a hammer person" as he's building your house?


That's a bullshiat comparison. You're an expert (supposedly) trained in the maintenance and operation of a complex system designed to be used by a user with a minimum level of training.

How many IT guys rely on their 20 year old beater to get them back and forth to work but are clueless when it breaks down? Hell, even airline pilots have a limited amount of troubleshooting they perform on their aircraft if something goes wrong. I guarantee that a maintenance pilot isnt going to belittle and criticize a pilot that can't diagnose a problem with a component he's barely aware exists, let alone isnt qualified to maintain.
 
2012-09-13 05:28:43 PM  

SirTanon: Pet peeve, yes... but it gets old after a while, and I'm sure I'm not the only one.


With me it's hearing "dummy terminal" ... If it's a terminal but not a computer in its own right, feel free to call it a "dumb terminal" But something is only a "dummy" anything if it's a non-functional mockup!
 
2012-09-13 05:28:55 PM  
At my office, we started a Q&A repository for various build problems that users have (software company). It's a (internally) public forum so a user can ask a question and crowdsource the answer. The biggest problem we have now is that users aren't searching the forum before posting their question so we get repeats.

I've found generally that by the time the users are willing to go to the forum, they're so frustrated that they forget or just plain refuse to search. I suspect that sort of frustration is the source of many of these phone calls. Our users are generally competent and they're just trying to get their job done.

/csb
 
2012-09-13 05:30:26 PM  

Nexzus: Not mine, but it apparently happened: "My USB drive won't work"
[img.thedailywtf.com image 448x336]


That pic just blows me away... Especially with the USB ports right next to it. All 6 of them.
 
2012-09-13 05:32:23 PM  

Hiro Nakamura: That's a bullshiat comparison. You're an expert (supposedly) trained in the maintenance and operation of a complex system designed to be used by a user with a minimum level of training.

How many IT guys rely on their 20 year old beater to get them back and forth to work but are clueless when it breaks down?


...except the "I'm not a computer person" utterance is usually used in relation to the computer equivalent of, say, putting gas in your car.
 
2012-09-13 05:33:05 PM  

Girion47: my work computer is so locked down I can't even configure my printer to connect to it wirelessly.


Sometimes that is to idiot proof the thing, we can't vet everyone who comes in the door and make a custom Group Policy for them. Most likely though, it's art of a blanket policy that the Sys Admin set up, and he isn't aware that it's happening. We get the same thing with proxy services, install a pre-configured setup and then realize all of the stuff that is blocked that we have no problem with turning on. It's much easier that way than trying to build from scratch.

Otherwise, just get LogMeIn on your computer and have the IT guys remote in. That software rocks.
 
2012-09-13 05:36:39 PM  

Mikey1969: Girion47: my work computer is so locked down I can't even configure my printer to connect to it wirelessly.

Sometimes that is to idiot proof the thing, we can't vet everyone who comes in the door and make a custom Group Policy for them. Most likely though, it's art of a blanket policy that the Sys Admin set up, and he isn't aware that it's happening. We get the same thing with proxy services, install a pre-configured setup and then realize all of the stuff that is blocked that we have no problem with turning on. It's much easier that way than trying to build from scratch.

Otherwise, just get LogMeIn on your computer and have the IT guys remote in. That software rocks.


I can share my desktop with my whole company if I wanted to, its just a pain in the ass contacting IT when I can do it myself through the wizard that came with the piece of hardware.
 
2012-09-13 05:39:20 PM  

China White Tea: Hiro Nakamura: That's a bullshiat comparison. You're an expert (supposedly) trained in the maintenance and operation of a complex system designed to be used by a user with a minimum level of training.

How many IT guys rely on their 20 year old beater to get them back and forth to work but are clueless when it breaks down?

...except the "I'm not a computer person" utterance is usually used in relation to the computer equivalent of, say, putting gas in your car.


I was thinking the following:

User: "My car isn't working."

Mechanic: "What's the problem?"

User: "It's not working."

Mechanic: "Okay. Exactly what part isn't working?"

User: "The door won't open. I think the handle is broken."

Mechanic: "Okay. Did you try to unlock the car?"

User: "Of course I unlocked the car! I'm not an idiot!"

Mechanic: "Well why don't you try to unlock it again."

User: "I AM NOT AN IDIOT! I PUSHED THE UNLOCK BUTTON SO IT'S UNLOCKED!"

Mechanic: "Have you tried the door key? Your remote might be dead."

User: "Oh. I guess that worked. Sorry, I'm just not a computer car person."
 
2012-09-13 05:42:23 PM  

Hiro Nakamura: flaminio: kid_icarus: I can't believe they left out the most beloved line of all,

I'm not very computer illiterate...

...back in my help desk days, that line was uttered at least 500 times a day, made all the more maddening in that they seemed unaware they were stating the opposite of what they meant, but they all said it like that.

Yeah, the "I'm not a computer person" line always sets me off. The computer is a tool that you use for your job. Can you imagine a carpenter saying "I'm not a hammer person" as he's building your house?

That's a bullshiat comparison. You're an expert (supposedly) trained in the maintenance and operation of a complex system designed to be used by a user with a minimum level of training.

How many IT guys rely on their 20 year old beater to get them back and forth to work but are clueless when it breaks down? Hell, even airline pilots have a limited amount of troubleshooting they perform on their aircraft if something goes wrong. I guarantee that a maintenance pilot isnt going to belittle and criticize a pilot that can't diagnose a problem with a component he's barely aware exists, let alone isnt qualified to maintain.


I don't get mad if a user has a real problem with a system they're not familiar with. But to follow through with the car analogy, it would be like a user calling in and saying their car wouldn't go anywhere, and when I ask them what position they put the gear shift in they ask "What's a gear shift?"

I've had two users, doctors mind you, who called in when they got to the EULA on our site, and didn't want to hit Accept because they thought accepting the End User License Agreement would, and I quote, "End their User account".
 
2012-09-13 05:44:44 PM  

Hiro Nakamura: flaminio: kid_icarus: I can't believe they left out the most beloved line of all,

I'm not very computer illiterate...

...back in my help desk days, that line was uttered at least 500 times a day, made all the more maddening in that they seemed unaware they were stating the opposite of what they meant, but they all said it like that.

Yeah, the "I'm not a computer person" line always sets me off. The computer is a tool that you use for your job. Can you imagine a carpenter saying "I'm not a hammer person" as he's building your house?

That's a bullshiat comparison. You're an expert (supposedly) trained in the maintenance and operation of a complex system designed to be used by a user with a minimum level of training.

How many IT guys rely on their 20 year old beater to get them back and forth to work but are clueless when it breaks down?


I'm not expecting end users to fix their own computers. I'm talking about basic computing functions: printing a document to a different printer than their default, or copying a file from one folder to another. I may not know how to fix a car, but I do know how to drive a car.

When a user comes to me with a genuinely hard problem, I rejoice. That's the kind of stuff that makes my job interesting. The password reset/paper jam people are just annoying daily distractions.
 
2012-09-13 05:47:18 PM  
Oh great, one of these threads again. Wah! I'm being paid to provide a service and some people actually need my help. Wah! I hate being actually useful, I'd rather be a snotty, entitled perpetual adolescent because I know how something works and you don't. Wah!

News flash... Everybody working in the service economy is doing something for clueless clients who probably should know better, yet don't. It's why we keep bringing home paychecks; it's why we're needed in the first place. Get over yourself.
 
2012-09-13 05:48:39 PM  
Right, but people do bring their cars into the dealer for that kind scenario, albeit less frequently. A computer and a car are very similar in that they're these magic complex machines that are beyond the comprehension of mere mortals, according to them. The only thing that makes cars a weak analogy is that even nowadays, it's more socially acceptable to admit you're computer illiterate, because what you're really saying is "I'm not a nerd like you, nerd."
 
2012-09-13 05:53:45 PM  

flaminio: Hiro Nakamura: flaminio: kid_icarus: I can't believe they left out the most beloved line of all,

I'm not very computer illiterate...

...back in my help desk days, that line was uttered at least 500 times a day, made all the more maddening in that they seemed unaware they were stating the opposite of what they meant, but they all said it like that.

Yeah, the "I'm not a computer person" line always sets me off. The computer is a tool that you use for your job. Can you imagine a carpenter saying "I'm not a hammer person" as he's building your house?

That's a bullshiat comparison. You're an expert (supposedly) trained in the maintenance and operation of a complex system designed to be used by a user with a minimum level of training.

How many IT guys rely on their 20 year old beater to get them back and forth to work but are clueless when it breaks down?

I'm not expecting end users to fix their own computers. I'm talking about basic computing functions: printing a document to a different printer than their default, or copying a file from one folder to another. I may not know how to fix a car, but I do know how to drive a car.

When a user comes to me with a genuinely hard problem, I rejoice. That's the kind of stuff that makes my job interesting. The password reset/paper jam people are just annoying daily distractions.


That's the problem though. The vast majority of users don't have networked printers at home, they have ONE printer plugged into ONE computer via USB, all set up with self-installing drivers. And even at work, it's a situation out of the norm to have to print to a printer that your computer isn't mapped to. The only reason I know how to do stuff like that is because I get tired of calling IT for help, because I like knowing how to do stuff myself. But it's nowhere in my job requirement to know how to map my computer to the printer in the next building over because my POS won't print black and white because te cyan cartridge is empty.
 
2012-09-13 06:03:00 PM  

Mikey1969: Nexzus: Not mine, but it apparently happened: "My USB drive won't work"
[img.thedailywtf.com image 448x336]

That pic just blows me away... Especially with the USB ports right next to it. All 6 of them.


That one doesn't bother me that much. Even people who know their stuff don't often even realize those are strictly mechanical adapters. When you normally get an adapter, you expect interoperability with the protocol that matches the physical port; it's reasonable. As for the 6 USB ports... odds are the top one was just easier to reach from wherever.
 
2012-09-13 06:03:53 PM  
The correct button to press to run your weekly backups is NOT 'Restore'

Had someone do that with their 4 week old tape in the drive.
Twice
 
2012-09-13 06:04:26 PM  

ProfessorOhki: Mikey1969: Nexzus: Not mine, but it apparently happened: "My USB drive won't work"
[img.thedailywtf.com image 448x336]

That pic just blows me away... Especially with the USB ports right next to it. All 6 of them.

That one doesn't bother me that much. Even people who know their stuff don't often even realize those are strictly mechanical adapters. When you normally get an adapter, you expect interoperability with the protocol that matches the physical port; it's reasonable. As for the 6 USB ports... odds are the top one was just easier to reach from wherever.


I just realized that's not a thumbdrive, but a wireless keyboard adapter. That makes even more sense: they unplugged their old keyboard and plugged their new one into the same spot. Entirely reasonable.
 
2012-09-13 06:07:49 PM  
The one I hear most is "My kid must have got on it or something", which is code for "I went to goatfarkers.com and got a virus".
 
2012-09-13 06:11:24 PM  
The only one of those that really bothered me towards the end of my last job was the "I need a new computer" bullshiat. They've been doing the same tasks for over a decade. The old P4 can keep up with your word processing and spreadsheets, no problem. Especially since we maxed out your RAM when it got cheap a few years ago. The only reason hardware upgrades were on the calendar for 2012/2013 was the fact that the equipment was approaching EOL. Fans, hard drives, and capacitors only last so long.
 
2012-09-13 06:12:28 PM  
One of my fun ones:

Known asshole user calls up, complaining that his computer is not working. Swear up and down that he did absolutely NOTHING prior this happening. He watches constantly over my shoulder, just glaring. Totally non responsive to my question for all practical purposed. He finally leaves for a meeting. Not long after I figure out that the problem was that on his NT4 workstation, he put Domain Users in the "NO ACESS" group (IIRC). Killed access for, well, all Domain Users.

When confronted with this he tells my boss, that he didn't that changing the rights, in order to keep everyone off "HIS" machine, would have impacted the ability to work on the machine, so why tell us. Farking tool.

So yeah, I'd rather take a clueless nice user than a someone that has setup their own home network and thinks they know all the ends and out of Enterprise IT.

//years later met a guy that grew up with asshole user... turns out he was an asshole kid too.
 
2012-09-13 06:12:39 PM  

UberDave: Unoriginal_Username: UberDave: I can see those as annoying but are they really that big of a deal? Most are simple to solve. The calls that should be "dreaded" are the ones that are legitimate but they can't solve -

"Yeah, your secure FTP site is dumping me every 30 minutes right in the middle of downloading a large database dump, what's the deal?"

If you are connecting via VPN, could be your ISP. Could be your PC.


Not really. This is a from an IT office with many computers and many clients and secure sites that we are having no problems with. Add to that, I download dumps from them all the time that are rather large. We eventually got the download only to have a corrupt dump. This isn't the first problem I've had with them - usually it is because they change the rules. The admin on their side is new and now we are having "unusual" problems.



"Hi, your profiles are set up to prevent programs from creating local files on the local drive and is instead putting them in the virtual store. Could you release that for admin users?"

First, you don't want normal users to have local admin rights.
Second, if you do, and they start saving everything to their PC, and it goes tits up, their is no backup unless they do it themselves. Of course, it will be IT's fault for not backing up their local drive nightly.

This is at a secure government site that does black-hats on a constant basis. You don't give users *full* admin rights. What they call people with "admin" rights are actually pretty restricted. One site couldn't run the software because their set up wouldn't allow rights to Program Files (pretty standard), another wouldn't let the program write anywhere. This is an enterprise suite and the vast majority of data is written to an Oracle or SQL Server database. But it needs to update local settings, registry, create the occasional document from a template, etc. I had one client (a big Westinghouse site) not figure out what it was so they just started goin ...


Ah, well I can see why your problems would cause nightmares. But they wouldn't be the most dreaded, as I doubt there are many desk monkeys that would deal with those issues on a daily basis.
I'm lucky, work with an insurance company. My job is holder of the image/ HW replacement and tech support that can't be done over the phone. Or at least those that answer the phones don't think it can be done that way and put the shiat into my bucket
 
2012-09-13 06:13:24 PM  

ProfessorOhki: Even people who know their stuff don't often even realize those are strictly mechanical adapters.


I figured that out in about 2002... Of course, I read about USB when it came out and realized that it was a powered port, which is why some things don't work on non-powered hubs. Still, taking a USB device, and using an adapter, when there are USB ports right next to it is just complicating the matter. I wouldn't give these people a pass anyway, but that's just me. It' why we "lock down" our systems here, too many people who have no idea what they're doing at all.
 
2012-09-13 06:14:14 PM  

Nexzus: Not mine, but it apparently happened: "My USB drive won't work"
[img.thedailywtf.com image 448x336]


Pretty sure that's a wireless adapter for a mouse.

Hence it being in the mouse PS2.
 
2012-09-13 06:21:21 PM  

Honest Bender: Them: "My Email isn't working."
Me: "Ok, have you made any changes lately?"
Them: "Nope."

*20 minutes later*

Them: "Oh, well I did just get a new computer because my old one exploded. But I swear the settings are all the same!"

/Exaggerated but been there.


It was actually said to me over the phone back in the day: "My email quit working so i UNIstalled it." And because 56kbps was king, i had to drive over there with Eurdora lite on a floppy.

/ah, eudora...
 
2012-09-13 06:29:41 PM  

YixilTesiphon: Because People in power are Stupid: YixilTesiphon: TsarTom: "I'm legally blind, but I'm a confident and fiercely independent woman. I'm new on this job and I DON'T want anyone thinking they made a bad hire, so don't even ask me to bring in a co-worker. I can't see my screen beyond a slight glow and have literally never worked with computers before. Now then, I'm told that our monthly reports are not uploading correctly, and that is all I know. What do I have to do to fix it?"

The call that lasted FOREVER.

Come on, you can't leave us hanging like that. Did you immediately send an email to her supervisor? What happened?

Yeah, hopefully she got fired for being handicapped. Those people have all the advantages of special parking (Damned government intervention). What business did she have calling a technical support line anyways?

I know everything I say makes you foam at the mouth with rage, but are you suggesting that they should have kept a woman who can't use a computer at this job which requires using a computer?


When I worked at a hospital in Phoenix, we had a speech pathologist who was blind. Most people who are blind need to learn how to solve things by themselves, so that when there is nobody around to help _ they are not dead in the water.


I do believe that she had to take extensive notes on a computer as part of her job. Her blindness was not the whole of what defined her career.

That being said, the idea that some technical support person from some company should try to get some blind person fired because helping them is inconvenient -is repulsive... Kinda like your worldview.
 
2012-09-13 06:32:15 PM  

Mikey1969: SirTanon: ...and when they call you back every week or two because they forgot it/lost it, what then? Still cool after the 10th time? Or do you get a little impatient?

I only have a few that are like this, and usually someone has helped them by this time to not forget it. Otherwise, I just tell them to add a number at the end, write down just the number on a post-it, and don't re-use numbers until they get all the way to 9. Works pretty well.


When I was on the desk at my last place, 3 resets a week two weeks in a row, and I talk to their supervisor. Of course, that place was a collection agency, shiatty even by CA standards. Annual turnover was 125%.
 
2012-09-13 06:40:08 PM  

Because People in power are Stupid: YixilTesiphon: Because People in power are Stupid: YixilTesiphon: TsarTom: "I'm legally blind, but I'm a confident and fiercely independent woman. I'm new on this job and I DON'T want anyone thinking they made a bad hire, so don't even ask me to bring in a co-worker. I can't see my screen beyond a slight glow and have literally never worked with computers before. Now then, I'm told that our monthly reports are not uploading correctly, and that is all I know. What do I have to do to fix it?"

The call that lasted FOREVER.

Come on, you can't leave us hanging like that. Did you immediately send an email to her supervisor? What happened?

Yeah, hopefully she got fired for being handicapped. Those people have all the advantages of special parking (Damned government intervention). What business did she have calling a technical support line anyways?

I know everything I say makes you foam at the mouth with rage, but are you suggesting that they should have kept a woman who can't use a computer at this job which requires using a computer?

When I worked at a hospital in Phoenix, we had a speech pathologist who was blind. Most people who are blind need to learn how to solve things by themselves, so that when there is nobody around to help _ they are not dead in the water.


I do believe that she had to take extensive notes on a computer as part of her job. Her blindness was not the whole of what defined her career.

That being said, the idea that some technical support person from some company should try to get some blind person fired because helping them is inconvenient -is repulsive... Kinda like your worldview.


No, she should have probably been fired for never having worked with a computer before. If she was hired for a job that was heavy on their use either 1) HR did a crappy job or 2) She lied about her skills. Given how quick she was to try to hide things from her manager and co-worker, I'd lean towards 2. Not to say that one shouldn't have tried to assist with accessibility, but if after that, you kept getting calls because she actually lacked the requisite skills for the job... pretty sure that most IT departments aren't there to provide basic office skills training.
 
2012-09-13 06:40:20 PM  

Mr_Fabulous: Oh great, one of these threads again. Wah! I'm being paid to provide a service and some people actually need my help. Wah! I hate being actually useful, I'd rather be a snotty, entitled perpetual adolescent because I know how something works and you don't. Wah!

News flash... Everybody working in the service economy is doing something for clueless clients who probably should know better, yet don't. It's why we keep bringing home paychecks; it's why we're needed in the first place. Get over yourself.


So you think it's a bad idea to vent among ourselves?

Who else is there with whom to empathize? I've immensely enjoyed the stories told here; they make me realize that if we all stood in a circle and threw our troubles in the middle, we'd all go huntin' our own.

An IT consumer could never know the feeling of wanting to slap someone with a wet trout because said consumer insists on using a forward slash instead of a back slash in the run box when navigating to a file on the server.

/i've had to say "... SWEAR.TO.GOD you're using the back slash above the enter key! Don't make me come over there!"
 
2012-09-13 06:47:17 PM  
I can't stand users who want to work from home all the time and call in with whatever 'problem' they can think of.
If you have a real problem, get up off of your ass and bring your laptop into the office.
I don't have time to spend an hour remotely connecting through the VPN while you are on your shiatty home wireless network. I had work to do before you called, and I have more to do after I hang up on you.
 
2012-09-13 06:51:20 PM  

12000Eyes: An IT consumer could never know the feeling of wanting to slap someone with a wet trout because said consumer insists on using a forward slash instead of a back slash in the run box when navigating to a file on the server.


Of sure, be annoyed with the consumer because they actually do things properly.
static.flickr.com
 
2012-09-13 06:55:24 PM  

fluffy2097: Gone In 26 Minutes: I meant lie about things like rebooting your PC, checking connections, etc. If you're absolutely confident you've already done those things and we ask you to do it, just say you're doing it so we can cross it off the list. If you're not sure, of course, then it pays to err on the side of caution and just do what's asked. Remember, we're trying to get people back to work ASAP. We're not making people jump through hoops for amusement.

DO NOT TEACH THE USERS TO LIE!!!

All you are doing is teaching them that it is OK to not follow your instructions. Then they will lie about rebooting their computer anytime they believe that a reboot wont fix the problem.

/are you dense? telling users it's OK to lie about the problems they're having?
//I cannot count the number of times I've been told "I already rebooted it" Only to check the system up-time and it's been on for the past month.


Yeah, but there's a different side to that. I called an upstream provider to complain about about T3 taking errors and the first thing they wanted me to do
was reboot the router. Um, excuse me? Reboot core infrastructure? I don't farking think so. They wouldn't proceed with troubleshooting or even escalate the issue till I rebooted it. So I pulled the circuit off the router long enough to look like I rebooted it, that made them happy, and it turned out to be a dodgy line card in the telco's local OC3 mux.
 
2012-09-13 07:02:47 PM  

Nexzus: When I was on the desk at my last place, 3 resets a week two weeks in a row, and I talk to their supervisor. Of course, that place was a collection agency, shiatty even by CA standards. Annual turnover was 125%.


Yeah, that would be a bit much to deal with... Luckily 'most' of our users at least know which end of the computer to plug into the wall. Of course, I often see their password written on a post-it under their keyboard. Nice and secure... Unfortunately the times that I actually need someone's password, it's never written down, so I have to change it, do the work I need to do, and then let them know I've changed it without being able to email them or(obviously) leave a note. If they are on a week or two of vacation, that 'talk to them when they get back' thing gets a little long... :-)

I just don't understand the 'Can't remember a password' thing, they log in a couple of times a day, it should be relatively easy.
 
2012-09-13 07:05:37 PM  
blog.itsmartdesk.com
 
2012-09-13 07:06:49 PM  

Mr_Fabulous: Oh great, one of these threads again. Wah! I'm being paid to provide a service and some people actually need my help. Wah! I hate being actually useful, I'd rather be a snotty, entitled perpetual adolescent because I know how something works and you don't. Wah!

News flash... Everybody working in the service economy is doing something for clueless clients who probably should know better, yet don't. It's why we keep bringing home paychecks; it's why we're needed in the first place. Get over yourself.


You'd rather your IT guy unload on you someday when you can't figure out the same farking thing he has shown you 100 times already? Fine.

Otherwise, if you don't want to hear IT people complain about clueless users, don't join the thread. There are hundreds on fark over the course of a week, you don't have some kind of 'dibs' on all of them. Don't like it? GTFO, it's that simple.
 
2012-09-13 07:08:27 PM  

fluffy2097: I would much rather have someone tell me they were doing something they shouldn't have been or are simply too lazy to figure out how to work something, then for them to lead me off on some wild goose chase to fix an error they farking made up.


Yes.... One-of problems are hard enough to trace down and fix as it is, we don't need the issue compounded by someone making things up so that we aren't even heading in the right direction.
 
2012-09-13 07:11:51 PM  

Because People in power are Stupid: YixilTesiphon: Because People in power are Stupid: YixilTesiphon: TsarTom: "I'm legally blind, but I'm a confident and fiercely independent woman. I'm new on this job and I DON'T want anyone thinking they made a bad hire, so don't even ask me to bring in a co-worker. I can't see my screen beyond a slight glow and have literally never worked with computers before. Now then, I'm told that our monthly reports are not uploading correctly, and that is all I know. What do I have to do to fix it?"

The call that lasted FOREVER.

Come on, you can't leave us hanging like that. Did you immediately send an email to her supervisor? What happened?

Yeah, hopefully she got fired for being handicapped. Those people have all the advantages of special parking (Damned government intervention). What business did she have calling a technical support line anyways?

I know everything I say makes you foam at the mouth with rage, but are you suggesting that they should have kept a woman who can't use a computer at this job which requires using a computer?

When I worked at a hospital in Phoenix, we had a speech pathologist who was blind. Most people who are blind need to learn how to solve things by themselves, so that when there is nobody around to help _ they are not dead in the water.


I do believe that she had to take extensive notes on a computer as part of her job. Her blindness was not the whole of what defined her career.

That being said, the idea that some technical support person from some company should try to get some blind person fired because helping them is inconvenient -is repulsive... Kinda like your worldview.


This one is a tough call... Yes, if she misrepresented herself, then she shouldn't have a job, but at the same time, disabled people have to work twice as hard to prove that they are not a liability that this woman may have just been overcompensating. She still should have had a sighted person around to help verify stuff. Just because you're proud, it doesn't mean that you are bulletproof, but I can see her having some self-confidence issues, and being afraid that everyone was just waiting for the smallest fark up.
 
2012-09-13 07:26:56 PM  
Did no one mention BOHF?

Link
 
2012-09-13 07:27:08 PM  

12000Eyes: An IT consumer could never know the feeling of wanting to slap someone with a wet trout because said consumer insists on using a forward slash instead of a back slash in the run box when navigating to a file on the server.

/i've had to say "... SWEAR.TO.GOD you're using the back slash above the enter key! Don't make me come over there!"


Assuming you're dictating the path to the consumer, I have to ask: are you saying something like "C colon slash program files slash..."? If you're actually saying "slash", instead of "backslash", you have only yourself to blame. Technically, there's no such thing as "forward slash". There's just "slash" and "backslash". In English, "slash" - by itself - always means "forward slash".

On the other hand, if you're actually saying "backslash", nevermind. :-)
 
2012-09-13 07:31:02 PM  
In my helpdesk the worst was the lying. Don't lie to me about what troubleshooting has been done because I will catch you in the lie and it only prolongs the experience. I'm not asking you to do it because its irrelevant or unnecessary. While it's not rocket science there is a prescribed order of operations that helps make troubleshooting that much easier. It may be tedious, but it's necessary. Not wanting to crawl under the desk to reseat a cable will make me ask you to find another computer to swap out in the office. I will figure a way to make the next troubleshooting step even worse than the one before.

/tiny fists of rage
 
2012-09-13 07:36:24 PM  
"The internet is broken."

"Help me clear all the porn off my computer before the wife comes back."

After installing some new drivers..."OK so let's reboot your computer"
2 secs later "OK, done."
"No that was your monitor, reboot the big box under your desk. Hit Start..."
 
2012-09-13 07:52:48 PM  

Gone In 26 Minutes: We're not farking drones. Don't treat us like drones and we'll be absolutely fine with helping you. We'll be as pleasant to you as you are to us. We'll still biatch about the really dumb issues, but every single job in the world has 'dumb shiat we biatch out to our colleagues.' Generally, the problem isn't these issues themselves, but rather, that it's the same users calling about the same problems that are fixed in the same way. People who don't learn are facepalm-worthy to me regardless of what they do for a living, but we'll still help you fix it because that's what we're paid to do. If we vent in our spare time to the internet about it, well, I don't know what to tell you.


I always tried to be considerate. When I placed a TS call, I'd generally start by thanking them, and saying something along the lines of "I will do everything you ask. I am reasonably clueful, so if you just need me to navigate somewhere, just tell me. If I know how and where, I'll do it. If I don't, I'll ask you. Fair enough?" I dunno if that's exactly what you mean, but everyone was always very nice and patient with me.
 
2012-09-13 07:55:23 PM  
tl:dr Everyone complains about their jobs, and I will too. Most users are OK, some users suck, this one user really sucked.

All these remarks telling IT guys to get over it... I bet you farkers NEVER complain about your jobs.

I rarely have to talk to the unwashed users, but 99% of the time the transactions I have with them are pleasant and resolved quickly. It isn't those calls that stand out, though. I've seen competent techs who were berated by users to the point of tears. Here's my whiny story about an asshat user.

A quick background, this happens in the middle of a months long badly needed migration from a failing Exchange 2003 server to a shiny new Exchange 2010 server. We were short handed, and I was taking some calls (normally I just do network and systems monitoring, escalated issues, and design and engineering)

A user calls in, and asks to talk to an unavailable tech who reports to me. I tell this user that she isn't available, and that I can help her with her problem. This user says that her email looks different, she's using OWA on her personal computer to access her email (Outlook Web Access for those of you who don't know). I proudly inform her that her account has been moved to the new email server, and that it does look different, but adds a bunch of new functionality and dependability, and that I'm sure she'll grow to lik... She cuts me off, "I don't like it!" I was taken by surprise, as we're (OK "I'm") pretty proud of our new server. "I..I'm sorry."

She LOUDLY DEMANDS to know who's decision it was to move her account to a new server, and why wasn't she notified? I told her that the primary deciding factor at this point is mailbox size, we started with the smallest, and are moving batches over every night, and that this is a decision that was made months ago and it was public knowledge that this was happening. She pitches a fit like a grade school girl, "No one else I work with has the new server! I don't want the new server, I want to be put back on the old server!" To which I reply, "Everybody will eventually be moved to the new server, it's inevitable. I'm sorry, I can't move you back, is there something else I can help you with?" At this point, we go into a feedback loop repeating her last sentence and my last sentence, probably 6 or 7 times, before she demanded to speak with my report. I told her that she was unavailable. She demanded to know who could put her back on the old server, I told her that if it could be done, I would do it, but that nobody could do that, that she'd need to get used to the new interface. We then went back into the feedback loop, her getting louder each time, until she finally hung up on me.

The phone rang again, it was her, I told the tech to let it roll, sparing her the vitriol. It rolled through the other phones, and came back to my phone. I answered, she demanded to speak with the tech, I told her she wasn't available, and instead transferred her to my boss who was expecting the call.

I went to his office, and he put it on speaker. She was as sweet as sugar, complained about me, telling my boss that I was rude and unhelpful, to which he replied "That's strange, he's usually very nice." She asked if she could be moved back to the old server, he told her exactly what I did, "I'm sorry, we can't do that, is there something else I can help you with?" To which she replied, "It's just that it doesn't work right, I can't scroll through the emails like I used to, and it doesn't look as good." She needed to update her browser, she was using IE6. Everything worked fine after she updated.

A cursory check of this person's account showed me that she was a low level employee of no significance. Why did she think she could make such a demand? This whole thing took 3 times longer than it needed to, the user got herself all worked up about nothing, and in the end it could have been resolved very quickly if she'd just told me what the problem was.

So, yeah, you can be a demanding asshat, or you can just be nice and have your problem solved quickly and efficiently. In the end, you're just wasting my time and yours if you're a jerk. I imagine these people are the same people who treat waitstaff poorly, and kick their dog because of their own deep rooted inadequacies.
 
2012-09-13 07:56:05 PM  
Mikey1969
I just don't understand the 'Can't remember a password' thing, they log in a couple of times a day, it should be relatively easy.

Sometimes it just happens.
Some months ago I needed about half an hour to figure out a longish, rather randomized GPG passphrase that I've been using more or less regularly for ages
For some reason my mind mixed up the password pattern with a very similar one or some outdated passwords.
I knew that what I was typing was almost right and I had a general idea of where in the passphrase the error had to be, but it took some time and relying on tactile memory ("where do my fingers think they should be going now") to work it out again.
If that password had been for a system limiting the number of login attempts instead of a local encrypted file or if I hadn't had the time for half an hour of guesswork, I would have asked for a password reset, too.
Heck, if it had been possible to reset that password, I probably would have done so after 5-10 minutes.
 
2012-09-13 08:01:30 PM  

Dadoo: 12000Eyes: An IT consumer could never know the feeling of wanting to slap someone with a wet trout because said consumer insists on using a forward slash instead of a back slash in the run box when navigating to a file on the server.

/i've had to say "... SWEAR.TO.GOD you're using the back slash above the enter key! Don't make me come over there!"

Assuming you're dictating the path to the consumer, I have to ask: are you saying something like "C colon slash program files slash..."? If you're actually saying "slash", instead of "backslash", you have only yourself to blame. Technically, there's no such thing as "forward slash". There's just "slash" and "backslash". In English, "slash" - by itself - always means "forward slash".

On the other hand, if you're actually saying "backslash", nevermind. :-)


Personally, I always refer to the slashes like this when talking to a user:

"Forward slash, that's the one where the question mark is on the keyboard."

"Backslash, that's the one above the enter key and below the backspace key."

Then I'll throw in that the direction of the slash is referenced by the top side. That way they might find it easier when someone else is giving them directions.

Sure, it's wordy, but I very, very rarely get any confusion about what I mean. I also use the NATO alphabet when spelling anything out, and try to speak slow and clear.

I'm exceedingly helpful, but a bit dry and robotic sometimes.
 
2012-09-13 08:03:38 PM  
#1 F*CK PC LOAD LETTER!
#2 Only object if you also would not do it to get next to an office hot.
#3 it's only 15 years old!
#4 Update on your time, not mine.
#5 Write them down instead?
#6 Because the cheap pigs that own the business are still using 56K dialup
#7 I was working just before the issue arose.
#8 Ignoring that the warning emails also look like malware
#9 HR problem, not IT...because the IT guys know how to watch porn and not get caught.
#10 No excuse, but why are those drivers accessible to untrained users?
#11 Backstabbing snakepit - the 3 year old email you delete today will be the CYA you need tomorrow.
#12 But it's okay for the IT guy to set his sweating Super Big Gulp on the stack of contracts on your desk.
 
2012-09-13 08:05:29 PM  
FarkinOgre
All these remarks telling IT guys to get over it... I bet you farkers NEVER complain about your jobs.

Hm, it's a bit late, but maybe we can turn this into a tipping thread:
"If you want good service and a friendly IT-waiter, you better.. "
 
2012-09-13 08:09:28 PM  
SLIDESHOW BOB!

*runs into house and locks the door*
 
das
2012-09-13 08:13:34 PM  
ID-10-T error.
 
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