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(Webster Presbyterian Church)   "Church of the Astronauts," a small Presbyterian church, home to John Glenn and Buzz Aldrin, observes annual "Lunar Communion Sunday" in memory of Lord's Supper celebrated on the Moon   (websterpresby.org) divider line 31
    More: Cool, Buzz Aldrin, John Wayne, moons, Lord's Supper, Holy Communion, WPC, Hubble Telescope, Apollo missions  
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692 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Sep 2012 at 8:20 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-09-13 08:35:37 AM  
"Good luck, Mr. Gorsky"

"Amen"
 
2012-09-13 08:36:54 AM  
I love stuff like this. I'll try to make it next year. I didn't know they did a commemoration.

/anthropologist of religion, actually...
 
2012-09-13 08:37:17 AM  

Well....

f.cl.ly
 
2012-09-13 08:45:07 AM  
Huh, that's pretty awesome. I'd go, and I haven't been in church in years.
 
2012-09-13 08:47:13 AM  
"Last Supper on the Moon" would be a kickass Photoshop.
 
2012-09-13 08:49:55 AM  
Pretty interesting history of the church. They have a sliver of moon rock, a meteorite and some cosmic dust samples incorporated into the stained glass. Plus their first ordained minister was a woman, and in the 50s, to boot.
 
2012-09-13 08:57:44 AM  
That can't be a real church. Church websites are required to use an obscence amount of Flash.

Actually it's a pretty cool church. My daughter's youth singing group meets there for their practices.
 
2012-09-13 09:01:13 AM  
Does this mean that both men are open to mocking since they believed in Fark's favorite? boogieman sky-fairy?
 
2012-09-13 09:10:26 AM  

LaViergeNoire: I love stuff like this. I'll try to make it next year. I didn't know they did a commemoration.

/anthropologist of religion, actually...


The Aldrin moment on the moon was pretty cool. He had a wafer and a tiny cup of grape juice in a patch of his suit, and couldn't directly explain what he was doing over the comm because of a (ridiculous) lawsuit by some atheists after Apollo 8's Genesis reading.
 
2012-09-13 09:18:31 AM  

robohobo: Does this mean that both men are open to mocking since they believed in Fark's favorite? boogieman sky-fairy?


I wasn't able to find anything about "legitimate rape" on the church's website, so no.
 
2012-09-13 09:20:47 AM  
Didn't grow up Presbyterian, but grew up close to this church... parents moved to Clear Lake in 1970 for NASA (dad worked at one of the many contractors for NASA... designed the software for all the training simulators)
Mom said back in the beginning years of NASA, anyone who was anyone went to Webster Presbyterian... Being a member of that church was a status symbol...

we didn't go... Moms catholic, dad is agnostic.
 
2012-09-13 09:21:42 AM  

RminusQ: LaViergeNoire: I love stuff like this. I'll try to make it next year. I didn't know they did a commemoration.

/anthropologist of religion, actually...

The Aldrin moment on the moon was pretty cool. He had a wafer and a tiny cup of grape juice in a patch of his suit, and couldn't directly explain what he was doing over the comm because of a (ridiculous) lawsuit by some atheists after Apollo 8's Genesis reading.


The goblet he used for that communion is kept at the church mentioned in the article. It's interesting that communion "food" was the first food consumed on the Moon. A lot of astronauts had conversion experiences and I've interviewed one (not a lunar astronaut, but soon after) who is an evangelical Christian and whose experiences in space kind of cemented his beliefs.
 
2012-09-13 09:25:20 AM  

LaViergeNoire: RminusQ: LaViergeNoire: I love stuff like this. I'll try to make it next year. I didn't know they did a commemoration.

/anthropologist of religion, actually...

The Aldrin moment on the moon was pretty cool. He had a wafer and a tiny cup of grape juice in a patch of his suit, and couldn't directly explain what he was doing over the comm because of a (ridiculous) lawsuit by some atheists after Apollo 8's Genesis reading.

The goblet he used for that communion is kept at the church mentioned in the article. It's interesting that communion "food" was the first food consumed on the Moon. A lot of astronauts had conversion experiences and I've interviewed one (not a lunar astronaut, but soon after) who is an evangelical Christian and whose experiences in space kind of cemented his beliefs.


But Fark has told me than anyone who does anything with science is a hard core atheist, because only stupid, ignorant people believe in the Jebus.
 
2012-09-13 09:36:00 AM  

devildog123: But Fark has told me than anyone who does anything with science is a hard core atheist, because only stupid, ignorant people believe in the Jebus.


This Fark guy you're talking to sounds like an asshole.
 
2012-09-13 09:37:52 AM  

theorellior: devildog123: But Fark has told me than anyone who does anything with science is a hard core atheist, because only stupid, ignorant people believe in the Jebus.

This Fark guy you're talking to sounds like an asshole.


[welcometofark.jpg]

Also, everyone knows science-y types can't be assholes, cause they're science-y types.
 
2012-09-13 09:49:23 AM  
That certainly brings new meaning to "Our Father, who art in Heaven."
 
2012-09-13 09:57:26 AM  

devildog123: LaViergeNoire: RminusQ: LaViergeNoire: I love stuff like this. I'll try to make it next year. I didn't know they did a commemoration.

/anthropologist of religion, actually...

The Aldrin moment on the moon was pretty cool. He had a wafer and a tiny cup of grape juice in a patch of his suit, and couldn't directly explain what he was doing over the comm because of a (ridiculous) lawsuit by some atheists after Apollo 8's Genesis reading.

The goblet he used for that communion is kept at the church mentioned in the article. It's interesting that communion "food" was the first food consumed on the Moon. A lot of astronauts had conversion experiences and I've interviewed one (not a lunar astronaut, but soon after) who is an evangelical Christian and whose experiences in space kind of cemented his beliefs.

But Fark has told me than anyone who does anything with science is a hard core atheist, because only stupid, ignorant people believe in the Jebus.


A friend at JPL a few years ago told me that 1/3 of astronauts are "holy rollers" - YMMV (another 1/3 use their astronaut status to get laid and the final 1/3 in this guy's view were "normal"). And then there's the guys like Ed Mitchell, who had a very non-Christian religious experience and went on to found the Institute of Noetic Sciences in northern California. Astronaut Jeffrey Hoffman took a Torah into space and it's been on display since. Astronaut Sunita Williams went up with the Russians recently - she's of mixed religious parentage, but describes herself as a devotee of Ganesh, the elephant-headed Hindu god who's a remover of obstacles. Fascinatingly there are tons of rumors on Muslim discussion boards about how she supposedly converted to Islam a few years ago while in space.

/I'll stop now
//Really
 
2012-09-13 10:02:33 AM  
My condolences to them on the passing of their leader.
jimromenesko.com
 
2012-09-13 10:18:29 AM  

LaViergeNoire: /I'll stop now
//Really


Don't stop, this thread is one of the more interesting ones on Fark in a while!
 
2012-09-13 10:18:30 AM  
images1.wikia.nocookie.net

Not invited.
 
2012-09-13 11:13:40 AM  

devildog123: LaViergeNoire: RminusQ: LaViergeNoire: I love stuff like this. I'll try to make it next year. I didn't know they did a commemoration.

/anthropologist of religion, actually...

The Aldrin moment on the moon was pretty cool. He had a wafer and a tiny cup of grape juice in a patch of his suit, and couldn't directly explain what he was doing over the comm because of a (ridiculous) lawsuit by some atheists after Apollo 8's Genesis reading.

The goblet he used for that communion is kept at the church mentioned in the article. It's interesting that communion "food" was the first food consumed on the Moon. A lot of astronauts had conversion experiences and I've interviewed one (not a lunar astronaut, but soon after) who is an evangelical Christian and whose experiences in space kind of cemented his beliefs.

But Fark has told me than anyone who does anything with science is a hard core atheist, because only stupid, ignorant people believe in the Jebus.


Just my opinion (though based on a lot of experience) but this is a major part of the differences between scientists and engineers.

I've worked in engineering doing really bleeding edge stuff (both in industry and national lab sorts of places) for nearly two decades. Known a lot of extraordinarly bright engineers, the absolute experts in their fields. EEs and MEs mainly, but working in fields as diverse as microelectronics, software, optics, laser weapons, and nuclear energy systems.

And I have never known an engineer at any of these places (outside of academia) who was an atheist. Doesn't mean they weren't there, but if they were they were in a tiny minority. At one company I worked at their were several very active prayer group going on all the time and company off-sites that went over weekends had to not schedule anything for Sunday mornings because no one would go - they were all in church.

Scientists on the other hand (and I've known and worked with plenty of those) are different. I attribute it to the tendency in science to want nice, clean, abstract, closed-form solutions to everything while engineers have to take science and make it work in the messy, grubby real world. There are things scientists believe and spend time on that just doesn't make it past most engineer's gut-feel for what makes any practical sense in the real world outside the lab. The 'science' behind most secular humanist/atheist positions all falls into that.

In any event, my guess at an explanation aside, the reality is that most engineers - or at least most really good engineers - aren't atheist but tend to be Christian is pretty clear. And most of the astronauts were far more on the engineering side of things.
 
2012-09-13 11:29:52 AM  

robohobo: [welcometofark.jpg]

Also, everyone knows science-y types can't be assholes, cause they're science-y types.


You're the one getting all butthurt. So far no one has come in to this thread saying anything about sky-fairies, but you're the one all frothing about it. In other words, you sound... concerned.
 
2012-09-13 11:31:34 AM  
Pfft, Kerbals are better at mun landings.
 
2012-09-13 11:34:38 AM  
Jesus took the bread, broke it, and gave it to his disciples saying, "Do you like mmmmmmBANANAS?"
 
2012-09-13 12:39:26 PM  

theorellior: robohobo: [welcometofark.jpg]

Also, everyone knows science-y types can't be assholes, cause they're science-y types.

You're the one getting all butthurt. So far no one has come in to this thread saying anything about sky-fairies, but you're the one all frothing about it.


Yeah, almost as if there's more than one thread at this here website, and that people sometimes comment about the patterns frequently observed in those threads (like mentioning there being weapons-grade derp stinking up the Politics tab).

But that's just crazy-talk. There's only this one thread at fark.
 
2012-09-13 12:42:57 PM  

Cato: Just my opinion (though based on a lot of experience) but this is a major part of the differences between scientists and engineers.

I've worked in engineering doing really bleeding edge stuff (both in industry and national lab sorts of places) for nearly two decades. Known a lot of extraordinarly bright engineers, the absolute experts in their fields. EEs and MEs mainly, but working in fields as diverse as microelectronics, software, optics, laser weapons, and nuclear energy systems.

And I have never known an engineer at any of these places (outside of academia) who was an atheist. Doesn't mean they weren't there, but if they were they were in a tiny minority. At one company I worked at their were several very active prayer group going on all the time and company off-sites that went over weekends had to not schedule anything for Sunday mornings because no one would go - they were all in church.


Yeah, but what else would you expect from Oompa-loompas?

cdntheologianscholar.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-09-13 12:50:17 PM  

Son of Thunder: But that's just crazy-talk. There's only this one thread at fark.


Have you noticed the comments for each thread are sequestered from each other? Or is everything all jumbled up crazy-like on your screen?

Nobody was talking about sky fairies in here. Therefore, no one needed to bring them up.
 
2012-09-13 01:14:03 PM  
And the Shepard's prayer: "Dear Lord, please don't let me fark up.".
 
2012-09-13 01:24:16 PM  
*purr*
 
2012-09-13 03:31:32 PM  
The Presbyterian church is big on God actually giving his righteous flock a hand up in this life.
 
2012-09-13 07:14:03 PM  
www.websterpresby.org
Does Betsy Ross have to choke a b*tch?
 
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