If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NBC News)   New report lists the world's 100 most endangered species. Right now, that looks like anything living in Iran   (worldnews.nbcnews.com) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, endangered species, Zoological Society, three-toed sloths, Lists of IUCN Red List endangered species, economic values, Lonesome George, habitat destruction, threatened species  
•       •       •

2129 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Sep 2012 at 11:00 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-09-13 09:04:23 AM
Is there list of species linked from the article that does not require a 10 MB pdf download?

Before my car iPod adapter died I listed to a bunch of BBC podcasts about "saving species." One of them discussed the cost of saving the California Condor, many tens of millions of dollars. I saw one last week. It's a vulture.

The interviewers kept asking guests why should we save these species. The answer was typically not to save the species. The effort was more symbolic. If we save the purple people eater we inspire people to preserve the habitat where it lives, and by doing that we help the less attractive green monkey eater and yellow ape eater.
 
2012-09-13 11:02:36 AM
I would have thought it was anyone in an American Embassy or Consulate in the Middle East.
 
2012-09-13 11:09:01 AM
I have learned a thing or two in my life and chief amongst them is "kill the rabbit".
 
2012-09-13 11:13:28 AM

ZAZ: Is there list of species linked from the article that does not require a 10 MB pdf download?

Before my car iPod adapter died I listed to a bunch of BBC podcasts about "saving species." One of them discussed the cost of saving the California Condor, many tens of millions of dollars. I saw one last week. It's a vulture.


Yes, but its also a friggin awesome GIANT vulture that is the largest land bird in North America, so its a bit more significant than your average vulture
 
2012-09-13 11:29:07 AM
"The question was raised because the species closest to extinction don't have an obvious economic value to mankind and yet some, especially the experts, would argue for their protection"

Don't get me started on how narrow minded it is to not try to preserve a species because there is no "obvious economic value to mankind."
 
2012-09-13 11:34:01 AM
Except the goats. Right, Subbmittard?
 
2012-09-13 11:41:22 AM
The second and third paragraph make me want to do a Farnsworth.
 
2012-09-13 11:42:33 AM
Make that the forth one as well.
 
2012-09-13 11:46:44 AM
Creationists and conservationists have this in common: neither believes in evolution.
 
2012-09-13 12:06:34 PM

ZAZ: Is there list of species linked from the article that does not require a 10 MB pdf download?


It's actually worth it. Lots of pictures and info on the species in there. Would download again!!++++++
 
2012-09-13 12:32:12 PM

Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: "The question was raised because the species closest to extinction don't have an obvious economic value to mankind and yet some, especially the experts, would argue for their protection"

Don't get me started on how narrow minded it is to not try to preserve a species because there is no "obvious economic value to mankind."


This times eleventy.
 
2012-09-13 12:38:01 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Creationists and conservationists have this in common: neither believes in evolution.


We're just punctuating their equilibrium.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-09-13 12:53:06 PM
Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf

We have to come up with a dollar figure somehow because we're spending money or avoiding beneficial development. Somebody thinks California Condors are worth over $40 million. When there is no economic value we still have to ask ourselves what it's worth to have Cicindela dorsalis dorsalis flashing its wings at people walking on the beach. Or we can ask ourselves what it's worth not to feel guilty about extinguishing the subspecies.

Congress took certain wolf populations off the endangered list because the economic harm from protecting the population exceeded the benefit. Or the perceived harm exceeded the perceived benefit. Other places handle wolf predation by paying people for livestock killed by wolves. I like that solution because (1) it allows more accurate calculation of cost, (2) preventing ranchers from killing wolves is similar to a land taking, for which government traditionally compensates property owners.
 
2012-09-13 01:23:00 PM
If there's no economic use for anything why keep it around?

Mountains are just rocks that should be turned into gravel also, ya know, for more roads.
 
2012-09-13 01:32:08 PM

Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: "The question was raised because the species closest to extinction don't have an obvious economic value to mankind and yet some, especially the experts, would argue for their protection"

Don't get me started on how narrow minded it is to not try to preserve a species because there is no "obvious economic value to mankind."


Problem being, all the critics have to do is raise the question and argue long enough for the species to die out, and they win.
 
2012-09-13 01:35:29 PM
No Japanese river otter?

Oh.
 
2012-09-13 01:42:34 PM

Reverend Monkeypants: If there's no economic use for anything why keep it around?

Mountains are just rocks that should be turned into gravel also, ya know, for more roads.


Mountains have a fairly important effect on climate
 
2012-09-13 01:43:08 PM

ZAZ: The interviewers kept asking guests why should we save these species. The answer was typically not to save the species. The effort was more symbolic. If we save the purple people eater we inspire people to preserve the habitat where it lives, and by doing that we help the less attractive green monkey eater and yellow ape eater.


That, and knocking out key populations can cause a trophic cascade that knocks out other species. I listened to a radio interview today with the author of this book who gave an example from Yellowstone Park. Humans exterminated all the wolves there back in the 1930s. As a result, the elk population increased and they started grazing in one place for a long time, instead of being constantly on the move for fear of wolves. This wiped out the riverside trees. The loss of the trees got rid of the beavers. The loss of the beaver dams knocked out fish and bird populations and fouled the waters. More here.

For want of a nail ...
 
2012-09-13 01:45:14 PM

redmid17: Mountains have a fairly important effect on climate


Interesting paper on that here, although it focuses on the oceans. There are obviously large impacts on land too.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-09-13 02:35:09 PM
Ambitwistor

In the East the lack of wolves leads to too many deer, which prevent forest regeneration by eating young growth. Beavers here are doing fine, especially since Massachusetts voters passed an anti-trapping law in the 1990s.
 
2012-09-13 03:59:36 PM

ZAZ: In the East the lack of wolves leads to too many deer, which prevent forest regeneration by eating young growth.


Actually, that's only true if you ignore humans.

The reason we have so many deer in the East isn't because of a lack of wolves, per se: There weren't any wolves here in the early 1900's, and precious few deer, because we had shot them all (both deer and wolves). Once we got serious about conserving the deer, their numbers rebounded. Wolves weren't reintroduced, but coyotes have taken up much of their former ecological niche anyway, taking down fawns and sick adult deer, and feeding on the carcasses of those how die otherwise, where possible, along with smaller game.
 
2012-09-13 10:47:37 PM
I was hoping for a slideshow.
 
Displayed 22 of 22 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report