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(Science Direct)   Higgs confirmed: 125 GeV boson observed at LHC a few months ago assigned confidence level of 5.8 standard deviations. (Interesting trivia: peer-reviled, er, reviewed paper in Phy Letters B has hundreds of authors, including a Moroni and a Sakharov.)   (sciencedirect.com) divider line 66
    More: Spiffy, boson, LHC, electron volts, standard deviations, confidence level, God particle, weak interactions, muons  
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2232 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Sep 2012 at 2:22 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-12 07:22:29 PM

Geeves00: While it is cool and all and I get what the particle represents....but for us non physicists, what does this mean? What advancements in technology can this lead to? What can it be used for?

/Not meant to be snarky, I am genuinely curious


According to the Civilization 8 tech tree, the Higgs Boson leads to gravitic drives, which go on zero-velocity spacecraft.

The build times on those are a biatch, though. And you need a city with both antimatter collectors and dark energy harvesters built by engineers in the resource box. Those do horrid things to the health level of the city.
 
2012-09-12 09:18:52 PM

Geeves00: While it is cool and all and I get what the particle represents....but for us non physicists, what does this mean? What advancements in technology can this lead to? What can it be used for?

/Not meant to be snarky, I am genuinely curious


Being able to manipulate mass, I'd assume this will be handy for teleportation, energy storage/transfer, weight loss, and possibly be a key to FTL travel.

/All speculative.
//Find out what the scientists had to say to pitch it to their gov't to get funding to find it.
 
2012-09-12 10:11:32 PM

BolloxReader: Geeves00: While it is cool and all and I get what the particle represents....but for us non physicists, what does this mean? What advancements in technology can this lead to? What can it be used for?

/Not meant to be snarky, I am genuinely curious

According to the Civilization 8 tech tree, the Higgs Boson leads to gravitic drives, which go on zero-velocity spacecraft.

The build times on those are a biatch, though. And you need a city with both antimatter collectors and dark energy harvesters built by engineers in the resource box. Those do horrid things to the health level of the city.


I, uh, potato?
 
2012-09-12 10:44:49 PM

ThreadSinger: I, uh, potato?


It's a computer game. Much simpler than it sounds, way easier to understand than high-energy physics.
 
2012-09-12 11:03:21 PM
Still not six sigma?

upload.wikimedia.org

Still not impressed.

/hot
 
2012-09-13 12:09:06 AM
Goddess I love fark science threads.

And to those of you wondering, yes theoretical physicists either teach or go crazy. Or yes.
 
2012-09-13 12:52:37 AM

TheotherMIguy: Goddess I love fark science threads.

And to those of you wondering, yes theoretical physicists either teach or go crazy. Or yes.


Or, rather, I'd argue we're crazy to begin with. For getting a graduate degree in physics. I really do think you have to be (or become) a weeee bit cracked in the head.

/You can't help that. We're all mad here.
 
2012-09-13 01:02:14 AM

BKITU: skodabunny: Can someone help me here: If the higgs boson provides mass, and black holes are infinitesimally small points with incredible mass, how would the higgs boson involved in that? Or would it not be?

You are basically asking a question that can only be resolved by a working quantum theory of gravity. From Wikipedia's entry on Quantum Gravity: "However, certain physical phenomena, such as singularities [like black holes], are 'very small' spatially yet are 'very large' from a mass or energy perspective; such objects cannot be understood with current theories of quantum mechanics or general relativity, thus motivating the search for a quantum theory of gravity."

In other words, you're asking a question that would require devising a comprehensive theory of physics that has eluded the best physicists on earth for a century.


In other words, Skodabunny hit on exactly the question that physicists find interesting.
 
2012-09-13 03:21:31 AM
The panel is still out on this one...

This is the equivalent of saying while driving in thick fog...
"I think I see something up ahead...maybe it's a truck...a pickup?...a Ram?"

You "may" be wrong.

I think Hawking should hold his bet.
 
2012-09-13 07:00:52 AM

Tyrosine: reviewed paper in Phy Letters B has hundreds of authors, including a Moroni and a Sakharov

The real fight will be for the Nobel, and they can only pick three names.


Institutions as a whole have been awarded the Peace Prize before, can't CERN and Peter Higgs share one?
 
2012-09-13 10:30:07 AM

Bacontastesgood: ThreadSinger: I, uh, potato?

It's a computer game. Much simpler than it sounds, way easier to understand than high-energy physics.


Lol, thanks, I know that. I was just wondering for a second if there was in fact a Civ game that had that. Clearly not.
 
2012-09-13 10:35:58 AM

thisispete: Institutions as a whole have been awarded the Peace Prize before, can't CERN and Peter Higgs share one?


The Peace Prize has largely been a joke for over 60 years. It's the only one of the original 5 that is given by Norway. The Swedish Academy of Sciences is very anal about the other 4 prizes and has never broken the 3-living person rule (a couple of laureates have died between being announced and the ceremony which doesn't disqualify them).

Not that they won't ever do it, but seems unlikely.
 
2012-09-13 11:55:37 AM

StopLurkListen: BKITU: skodabunny: Can someone help me here: If the higgs boson provides mass, and black holes are infinitesimally small points with incredible mass, how would the higgs boson involved in that? Or would it not be?

You are basically asking a question that can only be resolved by a working quantum theory of gravity. From Wikipedia's entry on Quantum Gravity: "However, certain physical phenomena, such as singularities [like black holes], are 'very small' spatially yet are 'very large' from a mass or energy perspective; such objects cannot be understood with current theories of quantum mechanics or general relativity, thus motivating the search for a quantum theory of gravity."

In other words, you're asking a question that would require devising a comprehensive theory of physics that has eluded the best physicists on earth for a century.

In other words, Skodabunny hit on exactly the question that physicists find interesting.


Yup.

My point was that Fark is going to come up way, way short in being able to come up with a useful answer to the question. Most of the time in QM or GR threads, someone has a question along the lines of "Wait, how the hell does ________ work?" and can get a cogent response. Due to the nature of his question, though, that's not the case here. I wasn't trying to be an ass.

Interwebz are not ideal for conveying tone, sometimes. =/
 
2012-09-13 10:08:01 PM

Donnchadha: BKITU: Physics Letters B

Volume 716, Issue 1, 17 September 2012, Pages 30-61

Oh

MY

GOD!!!

Is this a time travel joke?


Gee, I dunno. Let me think about it while I'm test-driving a 2013 car later today.
 
2012-09-13 10:10:57 PM

Geeves00: While it is cool and all and I get what the particle represents....but for us non physicists, what does this mean? What advancements in technology can this lead to? What can it be used for?

/Not meant to be snarky, I am genuinely curious


I FARKING HATE the "But what is it GOOD FOR?" set. Honestly, if you have to ask this question, then you probably can't understand the answer.
 
2012-09-13 11:54:57 PM

Felgraf: TheotherMIguy: Goddess I love fark science threads.

And to those of you wondering, yes theoretical physicists either teach or go crazy. Or yes.

Or, rather, I'd argue we're crazy to begin with. For getting a graduate degree in physics. I really do think you have to be (or become) a weeee bit cracked in the head.

/You can't help that. We're all mad here.


So Felgraf...to make the math easier, do you just consider a horse as a sphere?
 
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