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(Science Direct)   Higgs confirmed: 125 GeV boson observed at LHC a few months ago assigned confidence level of 5.8 standard deviations. (Interesting trivia: peer-reviled, er, reviewed paper in Phy Letters B has hundreds of authors, including a Moroni and a Sakharov.)   (sciencedirect.com) divider line 66
    More: Spiffy, boson, LHC, electron volts, standard deviations, confidence level, God particle, weak interactions, muons  
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2233 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Sep 2012 at 2:22 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-12 11:54:54 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-09-12 12:18:02 PM  
Physics Letters B

Volume 716, Issue 1, 17 September 2012, Pages 30-61


Oh

MY


GOD!!!
 
2012-09-12 12:36:49 PM  
That...'s a lot of authors.

Oh, and WOO HOO!
 
2012-09-12 01:10:59 PM  

BKITU: Physics Letters B

Volume 716, Issue 1, 17 September 2012, Pages 30-61

Oh

MY

GOD!!!


Is this a time travel joke?
 
2012-09-12 01:12:56 PM  
He's not heavy.
He's my boson.
 
2012-09-12 01:15:09 PM  
Is it going to be in the iPhone 5? I'm confused...
 
2012-09-12 02:24:34 PM  

Donnchadha: BKITU: Physics Letters B

Volume 716, Issue 1, 17 September 2012, Pages 30-61

Oh

MY

GOD!!!

Is this a time travel joke?


It will haven being last week.
 
2012-09-12 02:28:19 PM  
I love a good set of bosons
 
2012-09-12 02:29:30 PM  
How many Freeman(s).
 
2012-09-12 02:30:06 PM  
Meh, I'll wait for the Sparknotes version on The Science Chanel with Morgan Freeman's voice telling me what I need to know.
 
2012-09-12 02:31:15 PM  
That's not quite confirmed, subby.

But still interesting.
 
2012-09-12 02:35:48 PM  
I understood a few of those words.

/haha, bosons... moroni
 
2012-09-12 02:37:40 PM  
It's pronounced 'bosun', but it's spelled boatswain.

math.boisestate.edu
 
2012-09-12 02:39:13 PM  
Looks like this paper was involved in some sort of party game where each author got to add one word to the article and then pass it on to the next one.
 
2012-09-12 02:42:18 PM  
The debate over first author must have been an interesting one.
 
2012-09-12 02:42:25 PM  
SAKHAROF?

A brave little theory, and actually quite coherent for a system of five or seven dimensions -- if only we lived in one.

Damnit, now I wanna play Alpha Centauri again...
 
2012-09-12 02:44:19 PM  

xria: Looks like this paper was involved in some sort of party game where each author got to add one word to the article and then pass it on to the next one.


Don't you understand science!? They had to look really really hard! Maybe if the LHC wasn't so darn big they would have found it sooner but come on, it would have taken 1 guy forever to look through all of those tunnels...
 
2012-09-12 02:44:27 PM  

xria: Looks like this paper was involved in some sort of party game where each author got to add one word to the article and then pass it on to the next one.


When i first read the top bit about how it was dedicated to everyone in the project who had died, and then went on to name hundreds of people, i was pretty shocked for a moment.

Not the best written thing ever, but they're only paid for sciencing.
 
2012-09-12 02:46:47 PM  
Was there magic underwear involved?
 
2012-09-12 02:48:25 PM  
Looks like this paper was involved in some sort of party game where each author got to add one word to the article and then pass it on to the next one.

Some fields are like this. You are supposed to include anyone who had a significant contribution to the research. The first author is the one who actually wrote the paper, and the names are generally listed in order of importance of the contribution. It is how people who aren't the actual writers get credit for their work. In high energy physics or anything with satellites, there are generally an amazing number of people involved because the research projects are huge.
 
2012-09-12 02:48:47 PM  

PirateKing: It's pronounced 'bosun', but it's spelled boatswain.

[math.boisestate.edu image 235x300]


Don't be a coxswain.
 
2012-09-12 03:04:04 PM  
Congrats to all who contributed to this discovery!
 
2012-09-12 03:06:55 PM  
I applaud their restraint in not titling the article, "FOUND IT; WE FARKING TOLD YOU SO."
 
2012-09-12 03:08:50 PM  
Subby, let's say I'm retarded. Try adjusting the headline so I can understand it.

/hypothetical situation
 
2012-09-12 03:18:40 PM  

Marine1: Subby, let's say I'm retarded. Try adjusting the headline so I can understand it.

/hypothetical situation


Basically, the Higgs Boson (a sub-atomic particle believed to be one of the main reasons why anything has mass) has now been confirmed to have been observed. 5.8 standards of deviation is sort of a measure of how 'certain' they are of what they saw was real, as opposed to a random fluctuation/random event occurring. Particle physics generally requires 5 standard deviations (or more) for something to be truly 'confirmed': At five standard deviations, there is only a 1 in 2,000,000 that what was observed was due to chance.

125 GeV means 125 Giga Electron Volts (or 125*10^9 electron volts). Electron volts are technically a unit of energy-however, because mass is equivalent to energy (E=mc^2), Electron Volts are, in particle physics, used as a shorthand for the mass of particles. Because otherwise they'd have to use really, really, REALLY friggen tiny units of mass, otherwise. (Technically, the unit is eV/c^2, but the /c^2 portion is usually left out).
 
2012-09-12 03:26:56 PM  

Felgraf: Marine1: Subby, let's say I'm retarded. Try adjusting the headline so I can understand it.

/hypothetical situation

Basically, the Higgs Boson (a sub-atomic particle believed to be one of the main reasons why anything has mass) has now been confirmed to have been observed. 5.8 standards of deviation is sort of a measure of how 'certain' they are of what they saw was real, as opposed to a random fluctuation/random event occurring. Particle physics generally requires 5 standard deviations (or more) for something to be truly 'confirmed': At five standard deviations, there is only a 1 in 2,000,000 that what was observed was due to chance.

125 GeV means 125 Giga Electron Volts (or 125*10^9 electron volts). Electron volts are technically a unit of energy-however, because mass is equivalent to energy (E=mc^2), Electron Volts are, in particle physics, used as a shorthand for the mass of particles. Because otherwise they'd have to use really, really, REALLY friggen tiny units of mass, otherwise. (Technically, the unit is eV/c^2, but the /c^2 portion is usually left out).


Thats neat
 
2012-09-12 03:28:18 PM  

Felgraf: Basically, the Higgs Boson (a sub-atomic particle believed to be one of the main reasons why anything has mass) has now been confirmed to have been observed. 5.8 standards of deviation is sort of a measure of how 'certain' they are of what they saw was real, as opposed to a random fluctuation/random event occurring. Particle physics generally requires 5 standard deviations (or more) for something to be truly 'confirmed': At five standard deviations, there is only a 1 in 2,000,000 that what was observed was due to chance.


Keep in mind they are only that sure something is there. It happens to be where they expect the Higgs to be, but there's still other things it could be instead.
 
2012-09-12 03:32:17 PM  
While it is cool and all and I get what the particle represents....but for us non physicists, what does this mean? What advancements in technology can this lead to? What can it be used for?

/Not meant to be snarky, I am genuinely curious
 
2012-09-12 03:33:37 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: That's not quite confirmed, subby.

But still interesting.


My first green. Where do I pick up my check?

Not confirmed? I don't know if you're kidding, but if Megan Fox said that the odds that she would not come over wearing nothing but a thong and a bottle of champagne was 5.8 sigma I would probably clear my calendar that night.

I think I see your point now that I've read your other post...yeah, it could just be something that has all the expected characteristics of the Higgs boson...
 
2012-09-12 03:40:02 PM  
I just want to know if this means we are the good universe or do I have to grow a goatee?
 
2012-09-12 03:42:35 PM  

Geeves00: While it is cool and all and I get what the particle represents....but for us non physicists, what does this mean? What advancements in technology can this lead to? What can it be used for?

/Not meant to be snarky, I am genuinely curious


Pretty good explanation on wikipedia, give it a try... It's a very up to date article. The experiment which appeared to detect the particle was on July 4th (go USA!) but the data wasn't completely crunched (and the article written) till yesterday.

And of course I am just kidding about go USA - the LHC is staffed by thousands of scientists from dozens of countries

//still can't resist making a joke about the Large Hardon Collider
 
2012-09-12 03:46:54 PM  

Donnchadha: Is this a time travel joke?


You know who else enjoyed time travel jokes?
 
2012-09-12 03:46:54 PM  

xria: Looks like this paper was involved in some sort of party game where each author got to add one word to the article and then pass it on to the next one.


It's standard procedure in particle physics publications to list every author in the collaboration. The person who conducted the analysis and wrote the paper is then referred to as the "principle author".

For example, here's the most recent publication from the Belle experiment in Japan. (PDF)
 
2012-09-12 03:56:32 PM  
www.flyersandposters.co.uk


They found the bosun in the purser.
 
2012-09-12 03:57:43 PM  
reviewed paper in Phy Letters B has hundreds of authors, including a Moroni and a Sakharov

The real fight will be for the Nobel, and they can only pick three names.
 
2012-09-12 04:01:17 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: atomic particle believed to be one of the main reasons why anything has mass) has now been confirmed to have been observed. 5.8 standards of deviation is sort of a measure of how 'certain' they are of what they saw was real, as opposed to a random fluctuation/random event occurring. Particle physics generally requires 5 standard deviations (or more) for something to be truly 'confirmed': At five standard deviations, there is only a 1 in 2,000,000 that what was observed was due to chance.


Point-Not a particle physicist (Nanophysics instead: I'm not a theorist for a *reason*), but thank you for reminding me! =3 I should have added that as a disclaimer, too.
 
2012-09-12 04:53:35 PM  
Can someone help me here: If the higgs boson provides mass, and black holes are infinitesimally small points with incredible mass, how would the higgs boson involved in that? Or would it not be?
 
2012-09-12 05:09:51 PM  

Felgraf: Marine1: Subby, let's say I'm retarded. Try adjusting the headline so I can understand it.

/hypothetical situation

Basically, the Higgs Boson (a sub-atomic particle believed to be one of the main reasons why anything has mass) has now been confirmed to have been observed. 5.8 standards of deviation is sort of a measure of how 'certain' they are of what they saw was real, as opposed to a random fluctuation/random event occurring. Particle physics generally requires 5 standard deviations (or more) for something to be truly 'confirmed': At five standard deviations, there is only a 1 in 2,000,000 that what was observed was due to chance.

125 GeV means 125 Giga Electron Volts (or 125*10^9 electron volts). Electron volts are technically a unit of energy-however, because mass is equivalent to energy (E=mc^2), Electron Volts are, in particle physics, used as a shorthand for the mass of particles. Because otherwise they'd have to use really, really, REALLY friggen tiny units of mass, otherwise. (Technically, the unit is eV/c^2, but the /c^2 portion is usually left out).


For the longest time I used to wonder what units E=MC² was in. Heck, i'm still not all that sure. Does this mean the yield of say, a nuclear bomb could be calculated to eV, based off how much mass was lost in the reaction?
 
2012-09-12 05:15:29 PM  

Antimatter: Felgraf: Marine1: Subby, let's say I'm retarded. Try adjusting the headline so I can understand it.

/hypothetical situation

Basically, the Higgs Boson (a sub-atomic particle believed to be one of the main reasons why anything has mass) has now been confirmed to have been observed. 5.8 standards of deviation is sort of a measure of how 'certain' they are of what they saw was real, as opposed to a random fluctuation/random event occurring. Particle physics generally requires 5 standard deviations (or more) for something to be truly 'confirmed': At five standard deviations, there is only a 1 in 2,000,000 that what was observed was due to chance.

125 GeV means 125 Giga Electron Volts (or 125*10^9 electron volts). Electron volts are technically a unit of energy-however, because mass is equivalent to energy (E=mc^2), Electron Volts are, in particle physics, used as a shorthand for the mass of particles. Because otherwise they'd have to use really, really, REALLY friggen tiny units of mass, otherwise. (Technically, the unit is eV/c^2, but the /c^2 portion is usually left out).

For the longest time I used to wonder what units E=MC² was in. Heck, i'm still not all that sure. Does this mean the yield of say, a nuclear bomb could be calculated to eV, based off how much mass was lost in the reaction?


duh, should have looked that up. It's in Joules, kilograms, and metric light speed. Apparently, kg m² s-² is the same as 1 joule (with a huge, complicated proof for that bit)

So basically, one kg of mass contains 90,000,000,000,000,000 joules of energy.
 
2012-09-12 05:22:17 PM  

Antimatter: For the longest time I used to wonder what units E=MC² was in. Heck, i'm still not all that sure. Does this mean the yield of say, a nuclear bomb could be calculated to eV, based off how much mass was lost in the reaction?


Fundamentally, you can calculate that in any set of units you want, as long as they're consistent.

E is in a unit of energy, m is in a unit of mass and c is in a unit of velocity. If you use standard SI units, m would be in kilograms and c is in meters/second, which would make E in kg*m2/s2 which is also known as the Joule. You can then convert Joules to eV or ergs or calories or BTUs if you want. It's just if you use mass in pounds and the speed of light in furlongs per year, the resulting energy unit would be rather nonsensical but not technically incorrect.
 
2012-09-12 05:23:14 PM  

Antimatter: Antimatter: Felgraf: Marine1: Subby, let's say I'm retarded. Try adjusting the headline so I can understand it.

/hypothetical situation

Basically, the Higgs Boson (a sub-atomic particle believed to be one of the main reasons why anything has mass) has now been confirmed to have been observed. 5.8 standards of deviation is sort of a measure of how 'certain' they are of what they saw was real, as opposed to a random fluctuation/random event occurring. Particle physics generally requires 5 standard deviations (or more) for something to be truly 'confirmed': At five standard deviations, there is only a 1 in 2,000,000 that what was observed was due to chance.

125 GeV means 125 Giga Electron Volts (or 125*10^9 electron volts). Electron volts are technically a unit of energy-however, because mass is equivalent to energy (E=mc^2), Electron Volts are, in particle physics, used as a shorthand for the mass of particles. Because otherwise they'd have to use really, really, REALLY friggen tiny units of mass, otherwise. (Technically, the unit is eV/c^2, but the /c^2 portion is usually left out).

For the longest time I used to wonder what units E=MC² was in. Heck, i'm still not all that sure. Does this mean the yield of say, a nuclear bomb could be calculated to eV, based off how much mass was lost in the reaction?

duh, should have looked that up. It's in Joules, kilograms, and metric light speed. Apparently, kg m² s-² is the same as 1 joule (with a huge, complicated proof for that bit)

So basically, one kg of mass contains 90,000,000,000,000,000 joules of energy.



For those out there who don't speak science - that's about enough energy to power the entire United States for about 3-4 days (using 1995 energy usage - but probably close enough).
 
2012-09-12 05:33:40 PM  
Hey, Mr. Higgs, do you wanna do the twist?
 
2012-09-12 05:36:16 PM  

Antimatter: Antimatter: Felgraf: Marine1: Subby, let's say I'm retarded. Try adjusting the headline so I can understand it.

/hypothetical situation

Basically, the Higgs Boson (a sub-atomic particle believed to be one of the main reasons why anything has mass) has now been confirmed to have been observed. 5.8 standards of deviation is sort of a measure of how 'certain' they are of what they saw was real, as opposed to a random fluctuation/random event occurring. Particle physics generally requires 5 standard deviations (or more) for something to be truly 'confirmed': At five standard deviations, there is only a 1 in 2,000,000 that what was observed was due to chance.

125 GeV means 125 Giga Electron Volts (or 125*10^9 electron volts). Electron volts are technically a unit of energy-however, because mass is equivalent to energy (E=mc^2), Electron Volts are, in particle physics, used as a shorthand for the mass of particles. Because otherwise they'd have to use really, really, REALLY friggen tiny units of mass, otherwise. (Technically, the unit is eV/c^2, but the /c^2 portion is usually left out).

For the longest time I used to wonder what units E=MC² was in. Heck, i'm still not all that sure. Does this mean the yield of say, a nuclear bomb could be calculated to eV, based off how much mass was lost in the reaction?

duh, should have looked that up. It's in Joules, kilograms, and metric light speed. Apparently, kg m² s-² is the same as 1 joule (with a huge, complicated proof for that bit)

So basically, one kg of mass contains 90,000,000,000,000,000 joules of energy.


It doesn't matter if it's metric or not as long as all the units are adjusted to be in the right system. The resulting E could be expressed just as easily in electronvolts, joules, kilowatt-hours, kilotons [of TNT], calories, pound-feet, BTUs, horsepower-hours, etc. The bit about the joule isn't that complicated when you break it down, it's a derived unit: they basically said "a joule is however much energy is involved in applying 1 newton of force over 1 meter of distance." Since a newton is defined as the force to accelerate a kilogram 1 meter per second per second, that makes a joule (I hope I get this bit right): "the amount of energy used in moving a 1 kilogram mass, accelerating it 1 m/s every second as it travels along a 1 meter line." It not so much a proof as it is just how the unit was defined.

/Or in more electrical terms, a Joule is one Watt for one second
 
2012-09-12 05:39:30 PM  

Donnchadha: Antimatter: For the longest time I used to wonder what units E=MC² was in. Heck, i'm still not all that sure. Does this mean the yield of say, a nuclear bomb could be calculated to eV, based off how much mass was lost in the reaction?

Fundamentally, you can calculate that in any set of units you want, as long as they're consistent.

E is in a unit of energy, m is in a unit of mass and c is in a unit of velocity. If you use standard SI units, m would be in kilograms and c is in meters/second, which would make E in kg*m2/s2 which is also known as the Joule. You can then convert Joules to eV or ergs or calories or BTUs if you want. It's just if you use mass in pounds and the speed of light in furlongs per year, the resulting energy unit would be rather nonsensical but not technically incorrect.


We need to run that calculation, and name that unit of energy. Better yet, lets use Furlongs per fortnight.

so:

the speed of light = 1.8026175 × 10^12 furlongs per fortnight, so we have E = (1LB x (1.8026175 × 10^12 FpF)^2)

Solve for E.
 
2012-09-12 05:44:57 PM  

skodabunny: Can someone help me here: If the higgs boson provides mass, and black holes are infinitesimally small points with incredible mass, how would the higgs boson involved in that? Or would it not be?


You are basically asking a question that can only be resolved by a working quantum theory of gravity. From Wikipedia's entry on Quantum Gravity: "However, certain physical phenomena, such as singularities [like black holes], are 'very small' spatially yet are 'very large' from a mass or energy perspective; such objects cannot be understood with current theories of quantum mechanics or general relativity, thus motivating the search for a quantum theory of gravity."

In other words, you're asking a question that would require devising a comprehensive theory of physics that has eluded the best physicists on earth for a century.
 
2012-09-12 05:51:54 PM  

Antimatter: so:

the speed of light = 1.8026175 × 10^12 furlongs per fortnight, so we have E = (1LB x (1.8026175 × 10^12 FpF)^2)

Solve for E.


Approximately 325 septillion pound-FpF.

We shall call the unit a "subbysmom."
 
2012-09-12 05:55:25 PM  

Geeves00: While it is cool and all and I get what the particle represents....but for us non physicists, what does this mean? What advancements in technology can this lead to? What can it be used for?

/Not meant to be snarky, I am genuinely curious


At this point in time, there are no answers to your questions. But the same questions were asked about every major break-though in the last 100 years. When Einstein discovered the photo-electric effect, who would have predicted that spacecraft would be using the principle for generating power?
 
2012-09-12 06:36:18 PM  

BKITU: Antimatter: so:

the speed of light = 1.8026175 × 10^12 furlongs per fortnight, so we have E = (1LB x (1.8026175 × 10^12 FpF)^2)

Solve for E.

Approximately 325 septillion pound-FpF.

We shall call the unit a "subbysmom."


And this is why I love Google Calculator:
1 pound * (((1.8026175 * (10^12) furlongs) / (1 fortnight))^2) = 4.07668492 × 1016 joules
 
2012-09-12 06:37:29 PM  

Geeves00: While it is cool and all and I get what the particle represents....but for us non physicists, what does this mean? What advancements in technology can this lead to? What can it be used for?

/Not meant to be snarky, I am genuinely curious


once you know a thing exists you can do things with it.

This thing is `mass`

imagine if you could change whether something had mass or not. Maybe reduce inertia. cool sci fi stuff.
 
2012-09-12 06:48:09 PM  

dready zim: Geeves00: While it is cool and all and I get what the particle represents....but for us non physicists, what does this mean? What advancements in technology can this lead to? What can it be used for?

/Not meant to be snarky, I am genuinely curious

once you know a thing exists you can do things with it.

This thing is `mass`

imagine if you could change whether something had mass or not. Maybe reduce inertia. cool sci fi stuff.


You could throw saw blades at zombies.
images1.wikia.nocookie.net 
/hot
 
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