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(YouTube)   50 years ago we as a nation decided to accomplish the greatest feat of engineering and exploration thus far in human history   (youtube.com) divider line 69
    More: Hero, moons, JFK, lunar exploration, human history, explorers, Neil Armstrong  
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3977 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Sep 2012 at 11:02 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-12 10:11:19 AM
Soon, that meager footnote will be trumped by an even greater accomplishment.

ecx.images-amazon.com

Once we can build a Cherry 2000, stress will literally disappear overnight.
 
2012-09-12 11:04:38 AM
TV dinners?
 
2012-09-12 11:05:44 AM
Keeping the hot side hot and the cool side cool?
 
2012-09-12 11:11:30 AM
Practical technologies from space exploration:


CAT scans
MRIs
Kidney dialysis machines
Heart defibrillator technology
Remote robotic surgery
Artificial heart pump technology
Physical therapy machines
Positron emission tomography
Microwave receivers used in scans for breast cancer
Cardiac angiography
Monitoring neutron activity in the brain
Cleaning techniques for hospital operating rooms
Portable x-ray technology for neonatal offices and 3rd world countries
Freeze-dried food
Water purification filters
ATM technology
Pay at the Pump satellite technology
Athletic shoe manufacturing technique
Insulation barriers for autos
Image-processing software for crash-testing automobiles
Holographic testing of communications antennas
Low-noise receivers
Cordless tools
A computer language used by businesses such as car repair shops, Kodak, hand-held computers, express mail
Aerial reconnaissance and Earth resources mapping
Airport baggage scanners
Distinction between natural space objects and satellites/warheads/rockets for defense
Satellite monitors for nuclear detonations
Hazardous gas sensors
Precision navigation
Clock synchronization
Ballistic missile guidance
Secure communications
Study of ozone depletion
Climate change studies
Monitoring of Earth-based storms such as hurricanes
Solar collectors
Fusion reactors
Space-age fabrics for divers, swimmers, hazardous material workers, and others
Teflon-coated fiberglass for roofing material
Lightweight breathing system used by firefighters
Atomic oxygen facility for removing unwanted material from 19th century paintings
FDA-adopted food safety program that has reduced salmonella cases by a factor of 2
Multispectral imaging methods used to read ancient Roman manuscripts buried by Mt. Vesuvius


Read more at Suite101: Practical Applications of Space Technology: Discoveries and Developments by NASA and Their Benefit to Society | Suite101.com http://suite101.com/article/practical-applications-of-space-technology -a98927#ixzz26GiGPVoR
 
2012-09-12 11:11:31 AM
Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.
 
2012-09-12 11:12:58 AM

fearmongert: Practical technologies from space exploration:


Outside of all of that what has space exploration ever done for us?
 
2012-09-12 11:14:25 AM

UNC_Samurai: Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.


Clearly you are an insane space nutter for ever suggesting we should ever attempt to leave our planet.
 
2012-09-12 11:15:27 AM

Felgraf: UNC_Samurai: Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.

Clearly you are an insane space nutter for ever suggesting we should ever attempt to leave our planet.


I was going to reply to fearmongert by saying, "There's an awful lot of Life Extension technology on that list."
 
2012-09-12 11:21:43 AM

Crewmannumber6: Keeping the hot side hot and the cool side cool?


McDLT! McDLT!
 
2012-09-12 11:24:26 AM

Saiga410: fearmongert: Practical technologies from space exploration:

Outside of all of that what has space exploration ever done for us?


Hey pal... didn't you notice... There's FREEZE DRIED FOOD on there!?!?
 
2012-09-12 11:24:41 AM

fearmongert: Practical technologies from space exploration:


yap yap yap



What a bunch of faith-based wishful thinking. We don't have fusion reactors, and in any case Farnsworth was well on his way to make his fusor with or wihtout space.

None of the items on that list require anything to happen in space. War and business drove those items.

Felgraf: UNC_Samurai: Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.

Clearly you are an insane space nutter for ever suggesting we should ever attempt to leave our planet.


You are an insane Space Nutter to suggest there exist the materials and energy to do so. Unless you think the Periodic Table of Elements is missing elements, or that F=ma is a suggestion?

UNC_Samurai: Felgraf: UNC_Samurai: Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.

Clearly you are an insane space nutter for ever suggesting we should ever attempt to leave our planet.

I was going to reply to fearmongert by saying, "There's an awful lot of Life Extension technology on that list."


But I don't want to live longer! It's unnatural! Rockets and warp drives are natural, and grow in the forest!

Saiga410: Outside of all of that what has space exploration ever done for us?


Uh, "what has war done for us" is the correct answer. Unless you think that we didn't know how to put Teflon on a frying pan, but then suddenly a test pilot went into a tin can and then we knew?
 
2012-09-12 11:30:50 AM
War is the tinfoil fat that Life Extensionists use to keep space out of their brainwaves.
 
2012-09-12 11:33:02 AM

fearmongert: Saiga410: fearmongert: Practical technologies from space exploration:

Outside of all of that what has space exploration ever done for us?

Hey pal... didn't you notice... There's FREEZE DRIED FOOD on there!?!?


Quantum Apostrophe: , "what has war done for us" is the correct answer. Unless you think that we didn't know how to put Teflon on a frying pan, but then suddenly a test pilot went into a tin can and then we knew



I nominate you both for a ban from the Geek tab for the shear fact you cannot recognize a quote from Life of Brian. I am sorry but your geek credentials should be revoked.
 
2012-09-12 11:33:09 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: I mad


Yes, we know, sweetie. It's so easy.
 
2012-09-12 11:41:33 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: What a bunch of faith-based wishful thinking. We don't have fusion reactors, and in any case Farnsworth was well on his way to make his fusor with or wihtout space.


And the Smelloscope™!
 
2012-09-12 11:42:36 AM

Saiga410: I nominate you both for a ban from the Geek tab for the shear fact you cannot recognize a quote from Life of Brian. I am sorry but your geek credentials should be revoked.


"shear"?

UNC_Samurai: War is the tinfoil fat that Life Extensionists use to keep space out of their brainwaves.


Good one! I like it.

Can I play too?

Sci-fi is the tinfoil that Space Nutters use to keep reality out of their brainwaves.


Weee! This is fun.

Mentalpatient87: Quantum Apostrophe: I mad

Yes, we know, sweetie. It's so easy.


Mental patient, eh?

Look, what pisses me off with the Space Mythologists is their lack of curiosity about reality. You take any technological development, and then the tiniest bit of funding came from NASA for whatever reason, and suddenly we only have SPAAAAAAAAAAAACE to thank for a technology?

That's idiotic and childishly oversimplified. We get it, you like the romantic imagery of space.

But Jesus Christ, open your farking eyes and learn! Do you have any idea of the complex series of events and people that are involved in creating anything? Ignoring the contributions of war-time efforts, the banking industry (computers, buddy. Banks were there before space.), industrial uses, etc are all a much bigger part of the tech story.

Yet you fruitcakes sweep all these people under the rug and glorify your space stunts. 

Some of you idiots think NASA invented Teflon, Tang and the computer FFS.
 
2012-09-12 11:46:06 AM
Wake up, Space Sheeple!
 
2012-09-12 11:51:58 AM

UNC_Samurai: Wake up, Space Sheeple!


No, let them slumber peacefully. Ignorance is bliss. And in ten years when we are all still going to be right here, maybe the sheeple will want to wake up and learn.
 
Xai
2012-09-12 11:51:59 AM
what i would like to know is what happened to that great nation and how did it descend into the infighting, lawsuits and cowering in fear from the terrorism boogeyman it is today?
 
2012-09-12 11:52:27 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: UNC_Samurai: War is the tinfoil fat that Life Extensionists use to keep space out of their brainwaves.

Good one! I like it.


Oh man, you've never seen a Bevets thread, have you?? I am so sad for you right now....
 
2012-09-12 11:58:28 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: UNC_Samurai: Wake up, Space Sheeple!

No, let them slumber peacefully. Ignorance is bliss. And in ten years when we are all still going to be right here, maybe the sheeple will want to wake up and learn.


Right, because some people enjoy space research they're going to die within 10 years, but because you keep talking about how atoms are ageless that means you're immortal. Got it. You're swell.
 
2012-09-12 12:02:36 PM
Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.
 
2012-09-12 12:06:21 PM
Tang? Was it tang?
 
2012-09-12 12:13:49 PM

amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.


No. Sending out a lot of ships is nothing compared with sending a flying vehicle to land on another body in our solar system and return. Even accounting for relative naval technology levels in the 14th and 15th centuries.

This Chinese fleet crap is a load of crap. So they sent out ships, they didn't reach America, they only got as far as Africa, big whoop, the Portuguese had sailed further, the Chinese just went on a merry jaunt with a bigger fleet and bigger ships. I am distinctly unimpressed.
 
2012-09-12 12:23:17 PM

UNC_Samurai: Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.


I miss that show. I wish there was more quality sci-fi on tv nowadays.
 
2012-09-12 12:31:51 PM
Not because it was easy, but because it was haahd.
 
2012-09-12 12:45:03 PM
Going to the moon was an amazing engineering feat. It's interesting to note this was also going on at the same time, but in complete secrecy:
img2.imagesbn.com
 
2012-09-12 12:48:49 PM

Saiga410: Outside of all of that what has space exploration ever done for us?


Well there was the aqueduct
 
2012-09-12 12:54:35 PM

Slaxl: amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.

No. Sending out a lot of ships is nothing compared with sending a flying vehicle to land on another body in our solar system and return. Even accounting for relative naval technology levels in the 14th and 15th centuries.

This Chinese fleet crap is a load of crap. So they sent out ships, they didn't reach America, they only got as far as Africa, big whoop, the Portuguese had sailed further, the Chinese just went on a merry jaunt with a bigger fleet and bigger ships. I am distinctly unimpressed.


What system do you use to measure difficulty? I use Effort * Time. Under that measurement, the moon landings were easy. From first manned rocket to moon landing took a team of about ten thousand about 8 years. Also, the fact that two independant agencies were making the same progress is evidence that, although it was certainly a challenge, it does not rate amongst the great challenges of history.
 
2012-09-12 01:00:15 PM
 
2012-09-12 01:01:17 PM

amoral: Slaxl: amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.

No. Sending out a lot of ships is nothing compared with sending a flying vehicle to land on another body in our solar system and return. Even accounting for relative naval technology levels in the 14th and 15th centuries.

This Chinese fleet crap is a load of crap. So they sent out ships, they didn't reach America, they only got as far as Africa, big whoop, the Portuguese had sailed further, the Chinese just went on a merry jaunt with a bigger fleet and bigger ships. I am distinctly unimpressed.

What system do you use to measure difficulty? I use Effort * Time. Under that measurement, the moon landings were easy. From first manned rocket to moon landing took a team of about ten thousand about 8 years. Also, the fact that two independant agencies were making the same progress is evidence that, although it was certainly a challenge, it does not rate amongst the great challenges of history.


Considering that going to the moon is an idea that was around for a LOT longer than the Apollo program...your metric might be just a bit off.
 
2012-09-12 01:06:59 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Uh, "what has war done for us" is the correct answer.


War doesn't do anything useful when it comes to advancing technology.
Think about it: You spend decades developing new weapons and, when it comes to fruition, you classify them as a top secret for decades more.

The Manhattan project gave us the technology to eliminate the energy crisis, terraform large sections of earth to become habitable, do massive construction projects and even possibly travel the stars in style. But so much of it is still classified that nothing could be done with all that we learned.
For such a huge percentage of the war budget we get a few nuclear plants, a couple of k-booms, and a pile of miserable secrets.

Apollo on the other hand began with an open door policy. Things it developed were able to find uses in other markets because the technology was allowed to enter the public domain. Everything from the computer that guided it to the new materials they used to build it.
Yes the military was using NASA to advance its missile program, but those secrets also slipped and now we build these missiles for commercial use.

If you want true technological advancement, you don't want a war. You want a race.
 
2012-09-12 01:13:38 PM
September 12, 1962 was the day I was inducted into the Air Force.
It was just like that bastard Kennedy to upstage me!
 
2012-09-12 01:18:29 PM
i1151.photobucket.com
`...one giant *crackle* leap for mankind.'

Dammit! Who's eating a bag of chips? This is a closed sound-stage!
 
2012-09-12 01:19:03 PM

fearmongert: Practical technologies from space exploration:


CAT scans
MRIs
Kidney dialysis machines
Heart defibrillator technology
Remote robotic surgery
Artificial heart pump technology
Physical therapy machines
Positron emission tomography
Microwave receivers used in scans for breast cancer
Cardiac angiography
Monitoring neutron activity in the brain
Cleaning techniques for hospital operating rooms
Portable x-ray technology for neonatal offices and 3rd world countries
Freeze-dried food
Water purification filters
ATM technology
Pay at the Pump satellite technology
Athletic shoe manufacturing technique
Insulation barriers for autos
Image-processing software for crash-testing automobiles
Holographic testing of communications antennas
Low-noise receivers
Cordless tools
A computer language used by businesses such as car repair shops, Kodak, hand-held computers, express mail
Aerial reconnaissance and Earth resources mapping
Airport baggage scanners
Distinction between natural space objects and satellites/warheads/rockets for defense
Satellite monitors for nuclear detonations
Hazardous gas sensors
Precision navigation
Clock synchronization
Ballistic missile guidance
Secure communications
Study of ozone depletion
Climate change studies
Monitoring of Earth-based storms such as hurricanes
Solar collectors
Fusion reactors
Space-age fabrics for divers, swimmers, hazardous material workers, and others
Teflon-coated fiberglass for roofing material
Lightweight breathing system used by firefighters
Atomic oxygen facility for removing unwanted material from 19th century paintings
FDA-adopted food safety program that has reduced salmonella cases by a factor of 2
Multispectral imaging methods used to read ancient Roman manuscripts buried by Mt. Vesuvius


Read more at Suite101: Practical Applications of Space Technology: ...


I take it Apple's patent claims are still pending?
 
2012-09-12 01:27:00 PM

SN1987a goes boom: amoral: Slaxl: amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.

No. Sending out a lot of ships is nothing compared with sending a flying vehicle to land on another body in our solar system and return. Even accounting for relative naval technology levels in the 14th and 15th centuries.

This Chinese fleet crap is a load of crap. So they sent out ships, they didn't reach America, they only got as far as Africa, big whoop, the Portuguese had sailed further, the Chinese just went on a merry jaunt with a bigger fleet and bigger ships. I am distinctly unimpressed.

What system do you use to measure difficulty? I use Effort * Time. Under that measurement, the moon landings were easy. From first manned rocket to moon landing took a team of about ten thousand about 8 years. Also, the fact that two independant agencies were making the same progress is evidence that, although it was certainly a challenge, it does not rate amongst the great challenges of history.

Considering that going to the moon is an idea that was around for a LOT longer than the Apollo program...your metric might be just a bit off.


You can't measure difficulty by how long peopled wished something were possible. Only by how hard it proved to be once a determined attempt is made.
 
2012-09-12 01:40:42 PM

amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.


What new technology did they develop for those ships? People were sailing ships and much farther long before the Chinese did that. All they did was make them big and build a lot of them. By that measure, the Hummer is a huge automotive achievement. The Apollo program left Earth's gravity and took people to a place impossible to survive unassisted and came back. Apollo 11 made a round trip over 500,000 miles. The Chinese sailed less than 1% of that and good lot of them didn't survive the trip.
 
2012-09-12 01:47:17 PM

devine: UNC_Samurai: Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.
I miss that show. I wish there was more quality sci-fi on tv nowadays.


I think we should just get on with destroying the planet even faster than we already are. It would give us more incentive to reach out and rape the other planets too.
 
2012-09-12 02:20:37 PM

Grither: Quantum Apostrophe: UNC_Samurai: War is the tinfoil fat that Life Extensionists use to keep space out of their brainwaves.

Good one! I like it.

Oh man, you've never seen a Bevets thread, have you?? I am so sad for you right now....


I've come to the conclusion that QA is the same guy as Bevets, he just found a new schtick. He repeats the same exact posts in numerous threads, ignores logic and has no sound reasoning to anything he says. In a way it's almost awe inspiring to see someone that dedicating to trolling that they never break character, EVAR! Granted it's more sad than awe inspiring, but still.
 
2012-09-12 02:21:38 PM
Space is neat... Humans dont really need to go though, and we arent well suited for it. Moving to robotic exploration is the right idea at least until we find an actual reason to go besides "because we can".
 
2012-09-12 02:26:23 PM

SuperChuck: amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.

What new technology did they develop for those ships? People were sailing ships and much farther long before the Chinese did that. All they did was make them big and build a lot of them. By that measure, the Hummer is a huge automotive achievement. The Apollo program left Earth's gravity and took people to a place impossible to survive unassisted and came back. Apollo 11 made a round trip over 500,000 miles. The Chinese sailed less than 1% of that and good lot of them didn't survive the trip.


Not only that, but as much as people like to claim that Americans lost interest in space after the Apollo program, it wasn't nearly as bad as what happened in China when Ming's successor dismantled the treasure fleet. Most of the records of the fleet were destroyed (most of what we know today comes from written accounts in lands visited by the fleet), and building new ships of that size was made illegal. Whereas we're still sending people into low orbit and sending robots to other planets.
 
2012-09-12 02:31:22 PM

SuperChuck: amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.

What new technology did they develop for those ships? People were sailing ships and much farther long before the Chinese did that. All they did was make them big and build a lot of them. By that measure, the Hummer is a huge automotive achievement. The Apollo program left Earth's gravity and took people to a place impossible to survive unassisted and came back. Apollo 11 made a round trip over 500,000 miles. The Chinese sailed less than 1% of that and good lot of them didn't survive the trip.


Apollo didn't leave earth's gravity. And a diving bell takes people to a place that is impossible to survive and brings them back. So did Yuri gregarin's spaceship. And if distance travelled = difficulty, then any of the numerous space missions that have left Earth's gravity trump apollo by many thousands of times.

Asking how difficult something is is the same as asking how much effort is needed to overcome it. The challenge of landing on the moon was accomplished by a (relatively) small team in less than 8 years. It was trivial compared to humanity's truly great engineering accomplishments. In this century alone it is trumped by the development of controlled nuclear fission and the development of powered flight.
 
2012-09-12 02:32:03 PM

amoral: Slaxl: amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.

No. Sending out a lot of ships is nothing compared with sending a flying vehicle to land on another body in our solar system and return. Even accounting for relative naval technology levels in the 14th and 15th centuries.

This Chinese fleet crap is a load of crap. So they sent out ships, they didn't reach America, they only got as far as Africa, big whoop, the Portuguese had sailed further, the Chinese just went on a merry jaunt with a bigger fleet and bigger ships. I am distinctly unimpressed.

What system do you use to measure difficulty? I use Effort * Time. Under that measurement, the moon landings were easy. From first manned rocket to moon landing took a team of about ten thousand about 8 years. Also, the fact that two independant agencies were making the same progress is evidence that, although it was certainly a challenge, it does not rate amongst the great challenges of history.


It took a long time to accumulate enough knowledge to get to the moon, and that knowledge didn't all occur during just the space race. Humans have been dreaming of space exploration for a long time, and it was the accumulation of knowledge from century to century which finally made dreams reality.

Do I win?
 
2012-09-12 02:58:13 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: You are an insane Space Nutter to suggest there exist the materials and energy to do so. Unless you think the Periodic Table of Elements is missing elements, or that F=ma is a suggestion?


And yet you think there's enough energy for everyone to live forever and keep breeding. Because, um, wishful thinking, I guess?

Actually, mostly I just dislike you for the same reason I (as a physics grad student) dislike fellow physicists who sniff and go "Oh. *BIOLOGY*. People should study a REAL science." Or who look down at engineers for not being physicists. Etc etc.

I mean, feck, I actually research in (and *enthusiastically* research in) nanophysics/nanotech, one of the areas life extension advancements *ARE GOING TO COME FROM*. Hell, some of the research I'm working with my advisor on (Optically driven self-assembly of nanostructures) may one day pave the way (if we can get it to @#%#@ WORK) for some truly friggen amazing things. I actually do think life extension is *important*.

And I *STILL* think you're a prick. You are the anti-space personality core. "NOT SPACE. Nooot space!. SPACE IS DUMB. Not space not space not space. NOOOOOOT SPAAAAAAAACEEEEEE. Hey. Hey farkers, hey, hey, hey posters. Not space." You are combative, irrational, and quite frankly completely dismissive of alternative opinions or arguments in a stupidly insulting way.

Now, you might go "YOU HYPOCRITE! You pseudo-made fun of me earlier on!". And I did, yep! But I've seen people try to engage you in actual debate before, and you tend to be a jerk because people have the audacity to look at things differently than you.

You've even barged into threads that have nothing to do with space and gone off on rants. After which you've sometimes, well, vanished for a few days. Makes me wonder *why* that is.

Amazingly, I have the ability to support life extension technology (in some form or another), and also support continued poking at the stars.
 
2012-09-12 03:27:52 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: fearmongert: Practical technologies from space exploration:


yap yap yap



What a bunch of faith-based wishful thinking. We don't have fusion reactors, and in any case Farnsworth was well on his way to make his fusor with or wihtout space.

None of the items on that list require anything to happen in space. War and business drove those items.

Felgraf: UNC_Samurai: Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.

Clearly you are an insane space nutter for ever suggesting we should ever attempt to leave our planet.

You are an insane Space Nutter to suggest there exist the materials and energy to do so. Unless you think the Periodic Table of Elements is missing elements, or that F=ma is a suggestion?

UNC_Samurai: Felgraf: UNC_Samurai: Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.

Clearly you are an insane space nutter for ever suggesting we should ever attempt to leave our planet.

I was going to reply to fearmongert by saying, "There's an awful lot of Life Extension technology on that list."

But I don't want to li ...


not to dare suggest that your obvious mighty intellect could be in error, but don't they find new Elements... maybe not "all the time" but at least occasionally ?

/seriously don't know, but i bet some farker does
 
2012-09-12 03:31:15 PM

Felgraf: Quantum Apostrophe: You are an insane Space Nutter to suggest there exist the materials and energy to do so. Unless you think the Periodic Table of Elements is missing elements, or that F=ma is a suggestion?

And yet you think there's enough energy for everyone to live forever and keep breeding. Because, um, wishful thinking, I guess?

Actually, mostly I just dislike you for the same reason I (as a physics grad student) dislike fellow physicists who sniff and go "Oh. *BIOLOGY*. People should study a REAL science." Or who look down at engineers for not being physicists. Etc etc.

I mean, feck, I actually research in (and *enthusiastically* research in) nanophysics/nanotech, one of the areas life extension advancements *ARE GOING TO COME FROM*. Hell, some of the research I'm working with my advisor on (Optically driven self-assembly of nanostructures) may one day pave the way (if we can get it to @#%#@ WORK) for some truly friggen amazing things. I actually do think life extension is *important*.

And I *STILL* think you're a prick. You are the anti-space personality core. "NOT SPACE. Nooot space!. SPACE IS DUMB. Not space not space not space. NOOOOOOT SPAAAAAAAACEEEEEE. Hey. Hey farkers, hey, hey, hey posters. Not space." You are combative, irrational, and quite frankly completely dismissive of alternative opinions or arguments in a stupidly insulting way.

Now, you might go "YOU HYPOCRITE! You pseudo-made fun of me earlier on!". And I did, yep! But I've seen people try to engage you in actual debate before, and you tend to be a jerk because people have the audacity to look at things differently than you.

You've even barged into threads that have nothing to do with space and gone off on rants. After which you've sometimes, well, vanished for a few days. Makes me wonder *why* that is.

Amazingly, I have the ability to support life extension technology (in some form or another), and also support continued poking at the stars.


also:

believe this deserves the following:

www.charlestoncitypaper.com
 
2012-09-12 03:37:50 PM

jjwars1: amoral: Slaxl: amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.

No. Sending out a lot of ships is nothing compared with sending a flying vehicle to land on another body in our solar system and return. Even accounting for relative naval technology levels in the 14th and 15th centuries.

This Chinese fleet crap is a load of crap. So they sent out ships, they didn't reach America, they only got as far as Africa, big whoop, the Portuguese had sailed further, the Chinese just went on a merry jaunt with a bigger fleet and bigger ships. I am distinctly unimpressed.

What system do you use to measure difficulty? I use Effort * Time. Under that measurement, the moon landings were easy. From first manned rocket to moon landing took a team of about ten thousand about 8 years. Also, the fact that two independant agencies were making the same progress is evidence that, although it was certainly a challenge, it does not rate amongst the great challenges of history.

It took a long time to accumulate enough knowledge to get to the moon, and that knowledge didn't all occur during just the space race. Humans have been dreaming of space exploration for a long time, and it was the accumulation of knowledge from century to century which finally made dreams reality.

Do I win?


No, because the same thing applies to circumnavigating the globe. It took a long time to accumulate the knowledge to build great ships, and to be able to navigate out of sight of land. And not all of it occured during the age of discovery. Human beings have drempt of exploring the oceans for much longer than they dreamed of exploring space, etc etc.
 
2012-09-12 03:46:21 PM

amoral: Human beings have drempt of exploring the oceans for much longer than they dreamed of exploring space, etc etc.


I don't think that's a fair comparison. We've dreamed about crossing oceans and even about flying since before the dawn of civilization, but only with the advent of telescopes that let us clearly see the surfaces of the moon and other planets did we realize that there was actually something to explore ABOVE the sky.
 
2012-09-12 03:50:52 PM
We choose to go to the moon, not because it is easy, but because we want to show our technology is superior to the U.S.S.R.
 
2012-09-12 03:53:41 PM

amoral: jjwars1: amoral: Slaxl: amoral: Except that getting to the moon was a cakewalk compared to circumnavigating the globe. I don't even feel it was the greatest feat of engineering and exploration in the 1960s.

The greatest such feat in recorded history might go to the exploration fleets sent out by the Ming Dynasty of China.

No. Sending out a lot of ships is nothing compared with sending a flying vehicle to land on another body in our solar system and return. Even accounting for relative naval technology levels in the 14th and 15th centuries.

This Chinese fleet crap is a load of crap. So they sent out ships, they didn't reach America, they only got as far as Africa, big whoop, the Portuguese had sailed further, the Chinese just went on a merry jaunt with a bigger fleet and bigger ships. I am distinctly unimpressed.

What system do you use to measure difficulty? I use Effort * Time. Under that measurement, the moon landings were easy. From first manned rocket to moon landing took a team of about ten thousand about 8 years. Also, the fact that two independant agencies were making the same progress is evidence that, although it was certainly a challenge, it does not rate amongst the great challenges of history.

It took a long time to accumulate enough knowledge to get to the moon, and that knowledge didn't all occur during just the space race. Humans have been dreaming of space exploration for a long time, and it was the accumulation of knowledge from century to century which finally made dreams reality.

Do I win?

No, because the same thing applies to circumnavigating the globe. It took a long time to accumulate the knowledge to build great ships, and to be able to navigate out of sight of land. And not all of it occured during the age of discovery. Human beings have drempt of exploring the oceans for much longer than they dreamed of exploring space, etc etc.


First human to see the sea: 139,151bc
First human to float a bit on a boat type object before being eaten by a shark: 134,531bc
First human to realise the Earth was round: 246bc
First human to put 2 and 2 together and realise the Earth might be circumnavigated by ship: 522ad

So really we can only go from 522ad, right up until it was circumnavigated by Juan Sebastián Elcano in 1522ad, a total of 1,000 years. How fortunate all those numbers ended up being a round figure...

Right, so... space.

First human to see space: 214,351 years ago
First human to consider attempting to reach objects far above: 214,351 years ago.

Nuff said?
All figures are statistically accurate as provided by the University of Slaxl's department of early hominid interest and space travel dreams studies. :)
 
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