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(WLAC)   When Manhattan was attacked thousands of people were stuck on the island. This is the story of the Great Boat Lift (narrated by Tom Hanks)   (wlac.com) divider line 63
    More: Interesting, Boat Lift, Manhattan, boats  
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4613 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Sep 2012 at 12:41 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-12 02:53:24 PM  

four95: HAMMERTOE: seadoo2006: I know you're trolling, but there are no bridges south of the WTC ... when they collapsed, yeah, the entirety of the financial district was cut off from the rest of Manhattan.

Not trolling in the least bit. Manhattan Island is nearly a mile wide at the latitude of the WTC and most certainly was not "cut off" from anywhere. Granted, the self-important pricks on Wall St. were certainly inconvenienced a bit, but the boat-lift was a convenience, not a necessity.

Wanna know how I know you weren't there that day?


My thoughts exactly.

"Hey guys we're not cut off, all we need to do is to walk towards and through a thick cloud of smoke and debris with no knowledge of how many buildings have fallen or if we could even breath."

I guess the people jumping in the water were your typical wall st fat cats too important to wait in line.
 
2012-09-12 02:54:43 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Everything should be narrated by one of three people, Tom Hanks, Morgan Freemen or Mike Rowe.


Sam Elliott if it includes horses or mountains.

/Or The Dude.
 
2012-09-12 03:57:03 PM  

four95: Wanna know how I know you weren't there that day?


You're right and wrong at the same time. No, I wasn't there that day. But, we were all there that day too. I remember seeing nothing but foot traffic across all the bridges leading out of Manhattan. No vehicular traffic onto the island at all, except emergency and the ever-present Security forces. And yes, I remember the cloud so thick it indeed blotted out view of the damage for hours. I remember a video shot from a restaurant just up the street a block or two. The moment the first tower fell, the person shooting the video ran into the restaurant and kept shooting. In the space of 15 seconds, it went from day light to nighttime outside that window. But an eerie night, devoid of the orange glow of the streetlights, and too silent, the car horns and bus exhaust noise absent.

I freely admit, my opinion is a bit biased against Wall St., and the people who frequent it for their living. Not a decade after having to be rescued, they've got this country in the second-worst shape it's ever been in, thanks to their insatiable need to gamble, and our government's coke-whore reverence for the tax money generated by their gambling. And, truth be told, if I were in the area in my own boat, I would have also given people rides out of there, regardless. While I was not there, I am from NY, and still have family there, just not in Manhattan.
 
2012-09-12 04:00:16 PM  

IRQ12: I guess the people jumping in the water were your typical wall st fat cats too important to wait in line.


Why were people jumping in the water? I don't remember this part. Was all of Manhattan south of WTC choked with smoke? Were the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges impassable?
 
2012-09-12 04:59:03 PM  

HAMMERTOE: IRQ12: I guess the people jumping in the water were your typical wall st fat cats too important to wait in line.

Why were people jumping in the water? I don't remember this part. Was all of Manhattan south of WTC choked with smoke? Were the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges impassable?


I don't specifically know of people jumping in the water but I will take the guys in the video at their word. The bridges are north of the towers, the wind that day was eastern/southeastern. So when the towers fell it effectively blocked the people south of the towers from going north. I was north of the towers when they went down and to me it looked like the whole south side was on fire and/or falling down. That was with clear sight. The people south of the towers pretty much were blind. That's the reason most of the rescue and footage is from that pier and from the west side. It was the last place to find clean air.

Keep in mind people on the ground weren't clear view to see what was happening, all they knew was there was an attack and buildings were on fire, then earthquake like rumbling and a wall of smoke and debris. Bomb, more attacks, who knew?
 
2012-09-12 05:47:02 PM  

HAMMERTOE: seadoo2006: I know you're trolling, but there are no bridges south of the WTC ... when they collapsed, yeah, the entirety of the financial district was cut off from the rest of Manhattan.

Not trolling in the least bit. Manhattan Island is nearly a mile wide at the latitude of the WTC and most certainly was not "cut off" from anywhere. Granted, the self-important pricks on Wall St. were certainly inconvenienced a bit, but the boat-lift was a convenience, not a necessity.


For the first

IRQ12: HAMMERTOE: IRQ12: I guess the people jumping in the water were your typical wall st fat cats too important to wait in line.

Why were people jumping in the water? I don't remember this part. Was all of Manhattan south of WTC choked with smoke? Were the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges impassable?

I don't specifically know of people jumping in the water but I will take the guys in the video at their word. The bridges are north of the towers, the wind that day was eastern/southeastern. So when the towers fell it effectively blocked the people south of the towers from going north. I was north of the towers when they went down and to me it looked like the whole south side was on fire and/or falling down. That was with clear sight. The people south of the towers pretty much were blind. That's the reason most of the rescue and footage is from that pier and from the west side. It was the last place to find clean air.

Keep in mind people on the ground weren't clear view to see what was happening, all they knew was there was an attack and buildings were on fire, then earthquake like rumbling and a wall of smoke and debris. Bomb, more attacks, who knew?




Late to this thread, but this is EXACTLY right. My wife, then in her first year out of college, and before we were married, was there -- four blocks south of the south tower, standing at the corner of West St. and Rector St., when the first tower came down. They all started running south down West St. when the cloud of crushed concrete, paper, and various other blowing, flaming debris swept past them. They huddled under the overhang of the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel approach ramp, which was clogged with cars (so not going that way), in the middle of the dust cloud. They heard jets and helicopters overhead and wondered if we were under attack. Then they heard the second tower come down, and saw the second debris wave blast down West St.

At that point they had no idea what to do -- they couldn't go north, because of the tower debris, and if you're a New Yorker you know there's not much real estate left west, south or east. So they waited. And then, in the dust, they heard the horn from the Staten Island Ferry. And they walked towards the noise. And they got on the Ferry and went to Staten Island (she didn't even live there) and were safe.

So no, they couldn't just walk up town, or to a bridge. They might have gone into the tunnel, but are you really going to go underground into a major target if you think the city is under attack? Had they found a way clear of that debris cloud (which they didn't -- when she got on the ferry, relatively earlier in the process, the ferry terminal was still in the cloud), they sure as heck weren't walking back into it at any price.

/for obvious reasons, this video made me cry.
//for less obvious reasons, I've not told my wife of its existence yet. 
///Thank you, subby.
 
2012-09-12 06:25:20 PM  

IRQ12: HAMMERTOE: IRQ12: I guess the people jumping in the water were your typical wall st fat cats too important to wait in line.

Why were people jumping in the water? I don't remember this part. Was all of Manhattan south of WTC choked with smoke? Were the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges impassable?

I don't specifically know of people jumping in the water but I will take the guys in the video at their word. The bridges are north of the towers, the wind that day was eastern/southeastern. So when the towers fell it effectively blocked the people south of the towers from going north. I was north of the towers when they went down and to me it looked like the whole south side was on fire and/or falling down. That was with clear sight. The people south of the towers pretty much were blind. That's the reason most of the rescue and footage is from that pier and from the west side. It was the last place to find clean air.

Keep in mind people on the ground weren't clear view to see what was happening, all they knew was there was an attack and buildings were on fire, then earthquake like rumbling and a wall of smoke and debris. Bomb, more attacks, who knew?


You had to go east to head north. From the video you can see people at battery park. What I don't understand is why they did not loop around and head north to the Brooklyn Bridge on the west side. I'm positive many did but it sort of messes up the videos narrative. Great film none the less. People who work on the water every day have an inherent understanding of service.
 
2012-09-12 08:53:42 PM  

T.M.S.: IRQ12: HAMMERTOE: IRQ12: I guess the people jumping in the water were your typical wall st fat cats too important to wait in line.

Why were people jumping in the water? I don't remember this part. Was all of Manhattan south of WTC choked with smoke? Were the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges impassable?

I don't specifically know of people jumping in the water but I will take the guys in the video at their word. The bridges are north of the towers, the wind that day was eastern/southeastern. So when the towers fell it effectively blocked the people south of the towers from going north. I was north of the towers when they went down and to me it looked like the whole south side was on fire and/or falling down. That was with clear sight. The people south of the towers pretty much were blind. That's the reason most of the rescue and footage is from that pier and from the west side. It was the last place to find clean air.

Keep in mind people on the ground weren't clear view to see what was happening, all they knew was there was an attack and buildings were on fire, then earthquake like rumbling and a wall of smoke and debris. Bomb, more attacks, who knew?

You had to go east to head north. From the video you can see people at battery park. What I don't understand is why they did not loop around and head north to the Brooklyn Bridge on the west side. I'm positive many did but it sort of messes up the videos narrative. Great film none the less. People who work on the water every day have an inherent understanding of service.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~

Again, when the tower(s) fell, it choked off the Financial District from the rest of Manhattan ... look at the photos and videos of that day, there was a thick cloud of dust, debris, and the story of human remains horror that you cannot even imagine. Saying, "Just walk east to the Brooklyn Bridge" was like asking someone to walk through the scariest shiat imaginable. Battery Park was the lone bastion of refuge for half a million people on an island of 6 million.

Not too mention that with the easterly winds, walking towards the Brooklyn Bridge almost guaranteed you were walking into some thick smoke, gas, and dust ... the same smoke, gas, and dust that have caused hundreds of cases of early onset lung cancer and COPD.

wfsb.images.worldnow.com

The Brooklyn Bridge was accessible for many north of the WTC site, but for those south, well, there wasn't anywhere to go ...

Here's the dust cloud that hung over the Brooklyn Bridge for most of the next couple days after 9/11 ...

i.i.com.com

/I don't think many non-New York-ers understand what hell hole the southern tip of Manhattan was that day. The evacuation wasn't "lazy" New Yorkers, it was the only way out for many.
 
2012-09-12 09:08:29 PM  
Here's another photo of how thick the dust and smoke was crossing the Brooklyn Bridge ...

cdn.theatlantic.com
 
2012-09-12 10:06:02 PM  

Snapper Carr: Jake Havechek: Tom Hanks seems like a nice enough guy, but I always picture him talking like Forrest Gump.

You're lucky.

[img571.imageshack.us image 480x360]

He will always be Robbie WheelingPardieu to me


ftfy
 
2012-09-12 10:49:03 PM  

kf4lar: KaiC: @kf4lar - that's an awesome story. Hubby wants to go into NYC this weekend to look at how far they've gotten on the new tower since we were there last September, and I will suggest we check out the Harvey as well. :)

http://www.fireboat.org/calendar.php

Looks like they have a trip Saturday, but it's solidly booked. Still you could see them off at the pier.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEjRFAckjjM
 
2012-09-12 11:27:26 PM  

seadoo2006: T.M.S.: IRQ12: HAMMERTOE: IRQ12: I guess the people jumping in the water were your typical wall st fat cats too important to wait in line.

Why were people jumping in the water? I don't remember this part. Was all of Manhattan south of WTC choked with smoke? Were the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges impassable?

I don't specifically know of people jumping in the water but I will take the guys in the video at their word. The bridges are north of the towers, the wind that day was eastern/southeastern. So when the towers fell it effectively blocked the people south of the towers from going north. I was north of the towers when they went down and to me it looked like the whole south side was on fire and/or falling down. That was with clear sight. The people south of the towers pretty much were blind. That's the reason most of the rescue and footage is from that pier and from the west side. It was the last place to find clean air.

Keep in mind people on the ground weren't clear view to see what was happening, all they knew was there was an attack and buildings were on fire, then earthquake like rumbling and a wall of smoke and debris. Bomb, more attacks, who knew?

You had to go east to head north. From the video you can see people at battery park. What I don't understand is why they did not loop around and head north to the Brooklyn Bridge on the west side. I'm positive many did but it sort of messes up the videos narrative. Great film none the less. People who work on the water every day have an inherent understanding of service.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~

Again, when the tower(s) fell, it choked off the Financial District from the rest of Manhattan ... look at the photos and videos of that day, there was a thick cloud of dust, debris, and the story of human remains horror that you cannot even imagine. Saying, "Just walk east to the Brooklyn Bridge" was like asking someone to walk through the scariest shi ...


I still don't see how lower Manhattan was "choked off". Anyone at BPC had access to the east side. Look at the pictures.


I decided a long time ago to only hold true what I saw that day. It does make photos and testimony of the aftermath perplexing but I feel it's best for me to stick to my personal eyewitness accounts and experience.

I cannot say it was possible to walk east then north to the Brooklyn bridge from my vantage point (which was standing directly in front of 130 Broadway) when the south tower fell. The entire place became opaque within seconds.

But, I was lucky. At least enough to stumble into the lobby of 130, find my way to the basement, beat down a basement door with a fire extinguisher and travel east underground in a subway access tunnel. The group I brought exited at an emergency subway ladder near Maiden Lane and the path east was mostly clear for us. Nearly everyone I witnessed crossed the Brooklyn bridge to get away. I chose to go home as it was so close.

I honestly ask why you think the southern/ eastward routes were closed. I cannot see why that is the case from the available information people have now.
 
2012-09-13 09:41:36 AM  
Okay. I stand corrected. From all the aerial pictures I saw of the smoke trails, I thought they were going due east, and I assumed that the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges and Battery Tunnel were accessible to foot traffic. I knew the area very well, having grown up in NY, but left in 1986 to make my living someplace a lot more... peaceful. It makes me shudder to think, I went home on vacation and was standing at the base of the WTC on 9/11/ 2000. What a difference a year makes.
 
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