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(Some Guy)   Why baseball has a problem connecting with modern audiences: "[It's] a deliberately slow-paced game conceived at a time when people thought having fun caused polio"   (explodingunicorn.blogspot.com) divider line 258
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6326 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Sep 2012 at 11:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-12 06:48:11 AM
Call it what you will, but baseball is a summertime spectator sport. You go to the park, buy a beer and a hotdog, and sit around and chat with your friends. They were even smart enough to use a wood bat, so you hear a "crack" when it is time to pay attention.

The problem I see is that most of us learned to appreciate baseball by going to games as a kid. It was quite a thrill, and something that every scout troop, church, club, bar, or school could sponsor a bus trip for. Even in college, I have fond memories of sitting in the outfield of Veteran's stadium, drinking cheap Schlitz beer, and not spending $20 on the whole day.

I just wonder if there will be another generation of baseball fans. If you look at a telecast, you don't see a lot of 10 year-old kids in the audience...and even fewer who are not playing video games.
 
2012-09-12 08:24:01 AM

mr_a: Call it what you will, but baseball is a summertime spectator sport. You go to the park, buy a beer and a hotdog, and sit around and chat with your friends. They were even smart enough to use a wood bat, so you hear a "crack" when it is time to pay attention.

The problem I see is that most of us learned to appreciate baseball by going to games as a kid. It was quite a thrill, and something that every scout troop, church, club, bar, or school could sponsor a bus trip for. Even in college, I have fond memories of sitting in the outfield of Veteran's stadium, drinking cheap Schlitz beer, and not spending $20 on the whole day.

I just wonder if there will be another generation of baseball fans. If you look at a telecast, you don't see a lot of 10 year-old kids in the audience...and even fewer who are not playing video games.


At the very least, it'll be interesting to see a previously very popular sport slowly die off, if that happens. I don't think anything like that has happened in modern (last 150 years) history in western culture. Though, as one of the older American pastimes, I'd rather not see that happen.
 
2012-09-12 08:59:54 AM
The problem is they start the world series games too early, more kids will watch if you start the games at 2AM. It will somehow make more money too.
 
2012-09-12 09:01:14 AM
That guys sounds fat.
 
2012-09-12 09:06:46 AM

Cythraul:

At the very least, it'll be interesting to see a previously very popular sport slowly die off, if that happens. I don't think anything like that has happened in modern (last 150 years) history in western culture. Though, as one of the older American pastimes, I'd rather not see that happen.


Boxing.
 
2012-09-12 09:14:52 AM

FirstNationalBastard: Cythraul:

At the very least, it'll be interesting to see a previously very popular sport slowly die off, if that happens. I don't think anything like that has happened in modern (last 150 years) history in western culture. Though, as one of the older American pastimes, I'd rather not see that happen.

Boxing.


Boxing? I guess. I'm a bit too ignorant on the history of boxing, though. If that is the case, hasn't boxing kinda evolved into the extreme mixed martial arts scene? It'd be funny to see baseball take a similar route. How could baseball become 'extreme?'
 
2012-09-12 09:19:51 AM
And having a guy start a play by sticking his hand in another guys crotch, then running for 10 seconds, piling on top of each other then waiting 30 sec for the next play is exciting to watch?
 
2012-09-12 09:21:01 AM

Cythraul: FirstNationalBastard: Cythraul:

At the very least, it'll be interesting to see a previously very popular sport slowly die off, if that happens. I don't think anything like that has happened in modern (last 150 years) history in western culture. Though, as one of the older American pastimes, I'd rather not see that happen.

Boxing.

Boxing? I guess. I'm a bit too ignorant on the history of boxing, though. If that is the case, hasn't boxing kinda evolved into the extreme mixed martial arts scene? It'd be funny to see baseball take a similar route. How could baseball become 'extreme?'


Traditional boxing is still around as a corrupt shadow of its former self.

But, yeah, MMA has overtaken boxing with fight fans.
 
2012-09-12 09:22:04 AM

Dead for Tax Reasons: And having a guy start a play by sticking his hand in another guys crotch, then running for 10 seconds, piling on top of each other then waiting 30 sec for the next play is exciting to watch?


Sounds exciting to me!
 
2012-09-12 09:48:39 AM
Nothing a few spring-loaded bases, mined outfields and live sharks released at random in the dugouts can't fix!
 
2012-09-12 09:59:17 AM

mr_a: Call it what you will, but baseball is a summertime spectator sport. You go to the park, buy a beer and a hotdog, and sit around and chat with your friends. They were even smart enough to use a wood bat, so you hear a "crack" when it is time to pay attention.

The problem I see is that most of us learned to appreciate baseball by going to games as a kid. It was quite a thrill, and something that every scout troop, church, club, bar, or school could sponsor a bus trip for. Even in college, I have fond memories of sitting in the outfield of Veteran's stadium, drinking cheap Schlitz beer, and not spending $20 on the whole day.


Yep. And now the dog and beer alone will set you back close to $20. Hell, it wouldn't be so bad if you could get a farking Schlitz..and for less than the $8 they charge.

You know what will bring the crowds?...Even to a "awesome" team like this year's Astros? Japanese beer girls. The beer is on tap and it's brought to you by a cute Asian chick. They wouldn't be able to sell tickets fast enough.
 
2012-09-12 10:25:59 AM
It won't change because they're making more money than ever.
 
2012-09-12 10:32:29 AM
In addition to what some others have noted, in particular game-attendance costs seem pretty outrageous...

I think the problem attracting new fans (if that's a problem - while there are wasteland-empty stadiums, there are full ones, too) is that baseball's interest-activation level of knowledge is higher than other sports. You can know nothing about football or NASCAR, say, and still find the action reasonably entertaining when dropped down in front of it. If you only watch a game or two per year, and home runs (or, maybe, hits) are the only thing you find exciting, baseball is a boring game.

Once, however, you start to watch and learn about the subtleties and intricacy, it becomes much more entertaining. Of course, that's like many things: "Boring" is synonymous with "I don't know what I'm looking at." A game where "nothing" is happening can be *riveting*.

Compounding this problem are the (usually) terrible announcers, especially on national broadcasts. I have learned tons about baseball (and, thus, become a bigger and bigger fan) watching two reasonably smart former players call the game, and when I watch any other combination (good radio voice guy + dumb/arrogant former player, or voice guy + sports "analyst", or, worst of all "gaggle of 'sportscasters'"), I routinely find myself thinking -- "hey, what about..." or "what just happened there..." (especially common glaring omissions: Critical analysis of home plate umpire tastes / trends), as I am accustomed to good coverage of the details.

Further compounding the minimum-knowledge-requirement problem is that baseball requires attention to enjoy, both in the short term, over a game, and in the long term, over a long season. And, frankly, baseball fans' response to people who start getting interested only when the season becomes exciting -- denigrating them as "bandwagoners" -- is ridiculously counterproductive: Use that newfound interest to incubate a future full-time fan, dammit!

The solution to this is not making the game "more exciting" with any knee-jerk rule changes,* but I don't know what it is. I do think, though, MLB is -exactly-wrongheaded- with any restrictions on viewing its content -- blackout rules are stupid. If you're biatching about losing viewers MAKE YOUR GAME BROADCASTS FREE AND WIDELY AVAILABLE. But that may just be me.

I am not sure I am convinced there's really a problem -- many stadiums look full, tv is paying bundles of cash for the rights (and they're not exactly known as big supporters of money-losing operations) and some people are diehard fans. We don't all have to like everything, do we?

* IMNSHO: The one-game wildcard goes against the very foundation of baseball and is monumentally stupid, but that's a side rant
 
2012-09-12 10:44:06 AM

SFSailor: I am not sure I am convinced there's really a problem -- many stadiums look full, tv is paying bundles of cash for the rights (and they're not exactly known as big supporters of money-losing operations) and some people are diehard fans. We don't all have to like everything, do we?


One of the ironies is that if you are really a baseball fan and understand the game, things have never been better. Beyond MLB, I can see about 50 times as much college baseball on cable than 15 years ago. And the college product is good, and getting better!

I'm actually encouraged about the sport at the majors level getting better over the long term, because I think more exposure to NCAA programs will just raise the talent level as a whole.
 
2012-09-12 10:56:39 AM

Cythraul: How could baseball become 'extreme?'


Make it interesting.
 
2012-09-12 10:56:43 AM
As someone stated.... boxing is an excellent example of what some people probably think can't happen to baseball. Another few are horse racing and pro bowling.

Pro bowling tournaments got huge weekend ratings back in the 60s and 70s.... i think it would rival anything tennis or even golf got on a week in, week out average basis.

Horse racing other than if some horse is going for the Triple Crown is fairly irrelevant to most people

I think baseball would be the first U.S. team sport with identities by cities/metro areas though that could be greatly marginalized. As much as "gung ho" USA! USA! sports fans malign soccer, between MLS becoming a better quality product, better run league, and more and more hispanics and native european peoples in the U.S., MLS is going to continue to be on the rise as a league and sport in the U.S. And with a lot of my nephews, they follow MLS much more than baseball.

I could see the order of pro league popularity in the U.S. within 30-40 years being:
NFL
NBA
MLS
MLB
NHL

Not sure if baseball could fall behind hockey in the U.S..... hockey has just never been able to "catch on" with a large audience past a few metro areas where it is probably the #2 or #3 team sport in their market, or at least their teams and the sport have a significant following (Detroit, NY, Chicago, Boston, Minnesota, Buffalo). If those 6 cities decided what was popular in U.S. sports, hockey would probably be 2nd behind football. But, the south and west basically nullify that where hockey is almost a non-entity.
 
2012-09-12 11:01:41 AM
Just to finish my thought, cut myself off a bit above.... back in the 1940s-early 60's, if you were to state the top sports followed by people in the US as a whole, you'd probably go with:

Baseball, Golf, Boxing, College Football, Horse Racing... I don't know if Indy Car as a whole was huge, but, the Indy 500 was certainly a much bigger event.

Now, Football would be #1, NBA is near the top, hockey is certain much more national than the "Original 6" days, College Football is probably #2. Golf is still in the top 10, but, Boxing and Horse Racing have been marginalized to really be only followed closely by small diehard communities.
 
2012-09-12 11:16:36 AM

lunchinlewis: One of the ironies is that if you are really a baseball fan and understand the game, things have never been better.


Indeed. The quality of the game being played gets better as time passes, at all levels. The quality of the stadiums is -night-and-day- better than the 70s/80s in many places. And the availability of the product has been revolutionized. Gone are the days of "if you're in the radio network, you'll get the game, otherwise, read the line score." And this is a good thing. What is farking retarded is MLB capping the distribution -- MLB.tv should be free (or low cost / not seen as a profit center) and without blackouts (or, at most, with *rational* blackouts). Anyone who is interested in your product should be allowed to enjoy it. People will still watch it on ad-sponsored TV and people will still go to games.

You mention college: Are they still using aluminum bats? Get rid of them, everywhere beyond, say, middle- and maybe high school, and the quality will go up. Otherwise, I think I'm'a stay mostly interested in MLB.

dletter: I could see the order of pro league popularity in the U.S. within 30-40 years being:
NFL
NBA
MLS
MLB
NHL


It may be my inherent bias, but is the NBA really that popular? Playoffs on cable, stadiums look empty, etc? That said, I never caught interest in it, so I am completely ignorant beyond occasional SC highlights. You're also forgetting NASCAR. And, it'll be interesting to see what happens with F1... if they manage it well, it could be a player; if not, it could be gone again from the US shortly. We'll see.

Anybody have objective, valid numbers across the sporting industry in terms of attendance / revenue from attendance / tv rights costs / tv viewers / advertising revenue? I imagine the owners all want to keep that a closely guarded secret (improving their ability to beg for socialist stadiums while enjoying a protected substantial profit, you see), so I doubt good data is available, but I'd love to see some.

Further, 30-40 years is a -long- time... if the safety-at-all-costs and think-of-the-children crowds get too much power and traction, the NFL could be eliminated as we know it in less than a decade. We'll see!
 
2012-09-12 11:36:07 AM

SFSailor: You mention college: Are they still using aluminum bats? Get rid of them, everywhere beyond, say, middle- and maybe high school, and the quality will go up. Otherwise, I think I'm'a stay mostly interested in MLB.


They are, although a couple of years ago they switched to a "de-tuned" bat, and it made somewhat of a difference. Offensive numbers dropped.

I don't have a strong opinion one way or the other on college bats. While I'm sure everybody could eventually adapt to wood bats, I think the overall competition level in college would drop and the number of programs would shrink. I think you would have to go down as far as the high school level with that or else the number of players who could make NCAA programs would drop.

But right now, there is good enough development path through the minors and various development leagues where former college players can make the adjustment away from aluminum while they're also getting the basic pro instruction that they need anyway after leaving college.
 
2012-09-12 11:38:57 AM
Slow paced? Have these people never been to a cricket match?
 
2012-09-12 11:39:26 AM
Bleeeern!
 
2012-09-12 11:39:53 AM

mr_a: Call it what you will, but baseball is a summertime spectator sport. You go to the park, buy a beer and a hotdog, and sit around and chat with your friends. They were even smart enough to use a wood bat, so you hear a "crack" when it is time to pay attention.

The problem I see is that most of us learned to appreciate baseball by going to games as a kid. It was quite a thrill, and something that every scout troop, church, club, bar, or school could sponsor a bus trip for. Even in college, I have fond memories of sitting in the outfield of Veteran's stadium, drinking cheap Schlitz beer, and not spending $20 on the whole day.

I just wonder if there will be another generation of baseball fans. If you look at a telecast, you don't see a lot of 10 year-old kids in the audience...and even fewer who are not playing video games.


Sailing is taking a huge hit and someone pointed out that "generational" activities are dying. Elders hang with elders, yutes hang with yutes, and no passes knowledge between the parties. I think maybe family reunions and family get togethers have been killed off by the intratubes and the loss of wages.
 
2012-09-12 11:41:09 AM
Have the pitcher throw a flaming fire ball instead of a boring non-flaming one - and use landmines as bases!
 
2012-09-12 11:42:15 AM
Baseball is kind of boring, I prefer...

theinfosphere.org
 
2012-09-12 11:43:49 AM
Oh, how precious, a hipster blogger's iconoclastic take on baseball.
 
2012-09-12 11:43:49 AM

Cythraul: At the very least, it'll be interesting to see a previously very popular sport slowly die off, if that happens. I don't think anything like that has happened in modern (last 150 years) history in western culture. Though, as one of the older American pastimes, I'd rather not see that happen.


Cricket. Well you did say western culture. It's dying because of the same reasons given about baseball in the article. Although recent attempts to increase the pace of cricket have increased its popularity somewhat.

Personally I was never one of those who found it offensive that a single match could last 3 days and end in a draw, but it's not hard to understand the appeal of Twenty20.
 
2012-09-12 11:44:07 AM
baseball needs to ditch the local blackout rules. I want to be able to buy mlb.tv for a year and get ALL the games. if you don't let me have my local games(without some proxy trickery)... what the fark is the point?
 
2012-09-12 11:46:24 AM
The "order" of sports in the US has changed a whopping once in the last 50 years (football passing baseball), I don't see how anything else will change any time soon. Major League Soccer is an afterthought unless and until they get the money to pull star players in their prime away from Europe.
 
2012-09-12 11:46:46 AM
So the point of the article was that the author doesn't like baseball. Got it.
 
2012-09-12 11:47:54 AM
TV also has its role in the dwindling attendance. I used to be able to watch 1 Jays game a week, on a Sunday, and then maybe once in a season they would make the Saturday game of the week. I would listen to all the other games on the radio and if I wanted to see one, I'd go to the game. Now, every game is on TV and coupled with the costs of actually going to the game, it's hard to convince yourself to go (plus, Rogers Centre is an absolutely horrible place) Still love the game though, I don't think it will die off but teams should shift to smaller baseball centric parks.
 
2012-09-12 11:49:22 AM

SuperT: baseball needs to ditch the local blackout rules. I want to be able to buy mlb.tv for a year and get ALL the games. if you don't let me have my local games(without some proxy trickery)... what the fark is the point?


This a million goddamned times. I want to get rid of cable but keep internet, and this is in the con column when it could easily be a non factor. RLY? Showing me 14 games is easy, but that extra one breaks your bank?

About the trickery... can I just list my area code as Alaska or something?
 
2012-09-12 11:49:43 AM

Khellendros: So the point of the article was that the author doesn't like baseball. Got it.


Pigs don't like art either.
 
2012-09-12 11:50:53 AM
Well, that explains this.
chslondon.com
/they must have thought simplicity and straightforwardness caused the plague
 
2012-09-12 11:51:25 AM

danzak: Rogers Centre is an absolutely horrible place


Long time Jays fan and I finally got to go this year. You didn't like it a little? The seats were small, but I loved it. It helped that we won.
 
2012-09-12 11:51:52 AM

Cythraul: mr_a: Call it what you will, but baseball is a summertime spectator sport. You go to the park, buy a beer and a hotdog, and sit around and chat with your friends. They were even smart enough to use a wood bat, so you hear a "crack" when it is time to pay attention.

The problem I see is that most of us learned to appreciate baseball by going to games as a kid. It was quite a thrill, and something that every scout troop, church, club, bar, or school could sponsor a bus trip for. Even in college, I have fond memories of sitting in the outfield of Veteran's stadium, drinking cheap Schlitz beer, and not spending $20 on the whole day.

I just wonder if there will be another generation of baseball fans. If you look at a telecast, you don't see a lot of 10 year-old kids in the audience...and even fewer who are not playing video games.

At the very least, it'll be interesting to see a previously very popular sport slowly die off, if that happens. I don't think anything like that has happened in modern (last 150 years) history in western culture. Though, as one of the older American pastimes, I'd rather not see that happen.


I think that it will simply be replaced by soccer. There isn't enough room for 2 slow paced, long seasoned sports.
 
2012-09-12 11:52:20 AM
Baseball is like religion, you have to get them while they're young. The kids need to be indoctrinated by playing and watching at a very young age. Otherwise they'll never truly be into it and pass it on to their own kids. For most people going to the game is just a once-a-year activity with friends.
 
2012-09-12 11:52:48 AM
I think it has more to do with teams like these guys:

content.sportslogos.net

When only a few teams have any chance of winning the World Series, it makes things boring for the casual fan. The reason the NFL is such a success with casual fans is that the teams are so evenly matched, you have no idea who is going to win the Super Bowl any year. Most people thought the NY Giants wouldn't even make the playoffs. 

/yes, there are years that are exceptions
//but not enough of them
 
2012-09-12 11:53:14 AM
It doesn't help that people today have the same attention span they had when they were 4.
 
2012-09-12 11:53:55 AM
Pro baseball is dull, unless you've got good seats. Minor league, where you can get right on the first base line for about ten bucks, is a pleasure...
 
2012-09-12 11:54:24 AM

mr_a: Call it what you will, but baseball is a summertime spectator sport. You go to the park, buy a beer and a hotdog, and sit around and chat with your friends. They were even smart enough to use a wood bat, so you hear a "crack" when it is time to pay attention.

The problem I see is that most of us learned to appreciate baseball by going to games as a kid. It was quite a thrill, and something that every scout troop, church, club, bar, or school could sponsor a bus trip for. Even in college, I have fond memories of sitting in the outfield of Veteran's stadium, drinking cheap Schlitz beer, and not spending $20 on the whole day.

I just wonder if there will be another generation of baseball fans. If you look at a telecast, you don't see a lot of 10 year-old kids in the audience...and even fewer who are not playing video games.


Well said, well said. This, for sure. What I love about baseball though, is the game can change in a matter of minutes.
 
2012-09-12 11:55:15 AM
I don't get this claim that Baseball is "dieing". About the only evidence you can point towards is the decrease in overall Market Share between other entertainment products in the last 5 years. So, yeah, they have a smaller slice of the pie now. But my god, the pie is exponentially larger now than it was just 10 years ago. Franchises are making more money now then they ever dreamed of Banking back in the 70's when Baseball was the undisputed American Pastime. The Idea that a Baseball team could sell for 2 Billions dollars would have gotten you Committed in the 80's. The network/cable deals teams are signing now would have gotten TV executives fired and sued for Malfeasance in the 90's. I'm not saying that Baseball cannot die out. I just dispute the weird notion that the game is currently experiencing a sharp decline in interest. The dollars indicate quite the opposite.
 
2012-09-12 11:57:29 AM

SFSailor: Indeed. The quality of the game being played gets better as time passes, at all levels. The quality of the stadiums is -night-and-day- better than the 70s/80s in many places. And the availability of the product has been revolutionized. Gone are the days of "if you're in the radio network, you'll get the game, otherwise, read the line score." And this is a good thing. What is farking retarded is MLB capping the distribution -- MLB.tv should be free (or low cost / not seen as a profit center) and without blackouts (or, at most, with *rational* blackouts). Anyone who is interested in your product should be allowed to enjoy it. People will still watch it on ad-sponsored TV and people will still go to games.

It may be my inherent bias, but is the NBA really that popular? Playoffs on cable, stadiums look empty, etc? That said, I never caught interest in it, so I am completely ignorant beyond occasional SC highlights. You're also forgetting NASCAR. And, it'll be interesting to see what happens with F1... if they manage it well, it could be a player; if not, it could be gone again from the US shortly. We'll see.

Anybody have objective, valid numbers across the sporting industry in terms of attendance / revenue from attendance / tv rights costs / tv viewers / advertising revenue? I imagine the owners all want to keep that a closely guarded secret (improving their ability to beg for socialist stadiums while enjoying a protected substantial profit, you see), so I doubt good data is available, but I'd love to see some.

Further, 30-40 years is a -long- time... if the safety-at-all-costs and think-of-the-children crowds get too much power and traction, the NFL could be eliminated as we know it in less than a decade. We'll see!


The MLB.tv blackout rules are obnoxious. I don't have cable so I stream the games using one of those sites when they're available. My wife, after watching me curse in frustration when a particularly good game wasn't available, decided that next year she'd get me MLB.tv for my birthday (in Feb) - but all of the games I'd like to watch would be blacked out because I live within 200 miles of my team.

They have the service, and it seems to work - why can't I just buy baseball games from them? Not letting me buy your product is one of the most frustrating things in the whole movie/tv/sports/music/books/software/video game industries.

As far as other sports go, I don't recall anybody really being that up in the arms over the NBA lockout last season (cue: "there was a lockout?") despite it lasting into December. And as far as revenue numbers go, the one being tossed around with the NHL CBA talks is that it went from $1.9B the year before the 04-05 lockout to $3.3B last year, and that the last two years have been the highest revenues ever. Wikipedia says NFL is $11B, MLB is $7B, NBA is $3.8B - but I didn't really look into how those numbers are calculated.
 
2012-09-12 11:58:24 AM
Eh, I don't think football is much better. There's a shiat load of waiting around in that too. And more frequent commercials.
 
2012-09-12 11:59:29 AM
It's interesting the nobody has brought up the impact of steroids on the fan base. Tons of young fans know baseball as a tainted sport, who cares about breaking records after the era of juice?
 
2012-09-12 12:01:51 PM
Boring. Takes less skill and athletic prowess than serious motorsports, such as AMA Daytona Sportbike, WSBK, and F1 (hell, "Wipeout" is more grueling). Stakes are lower.

The reason why Baseball was ever popular at all was because it's accessible. Anyone can play. No, not anyone can get into the MLB, but any kid with a stick and a ball-like object can put together a game - even if it's just batting practice. These days kids don't need cheap, accessible entertainment because they've got expensive, much more engaging entertainment.

Had the economy truly cratered, you would see Baseball gain in popularity over the next couple decades. As it stands, iPhones have replaced Baseball.

MLB is doomed to niche status in just a couple more generations. The only people who really care about it are from areas where the game is institutionalized into society, and even then it's still being surpassed by other things. Baseball just isn't that important or interesting anymore. Better entertainments have been invented and become more affordable.

/loved Baseball as a kid
//played junior leagues
///bored as hell with it and haven't watched a game in over a decade
 
2012-09-12 12:02:58 PM

thecpt: danzak: Rogers Centre is an absolutely horrible place

Long time Jays fan and I finally got to go this year. You didn't like it a little? The seats were small, but I loved it. It helped that we won.


Ya, his opinion is a little behind the cycle.

1989-1991: everyone in awe of the Skydome.
1992-1993: the awesome team plus the dome makes it the place to be In Toronto every night.
1994-1997: strike darkens the post WS glow, but the habit of going is not dead yet
late 90's: average teams, everyone's over the Skydome experience.
early/mid 2000's: "Tear down that ugly white elephant!"
late 2000's: Roger's takes over, reinvents the experience. "Eh, not bad."
Now: Team has promise. The dome will be back like bell-bottoms if they can win.
 
2012-09-12 12:03:57 PM

mr_a: You go to the park, buy a beer and a hotdog, and sit around and chat with your friends.


And in order to do that at a pro stadium all you need to do is lay out about $200 between tickets, parking and the aforementioned beer and hotdog...oh and of course, it will take 4 hours.
 
2012-09-12 12:04:50 PM

mr_a: Call it what you will, but baseball is a summertime spectator sport. You go to the park, buy a beer and a hotdog, and sit around and chat with your friends. They were even smart enough to use a wood bat, so you hear a "crack" when it is time to pay attention.

The problem I see is that most of us learned to appreciate baseball by going to games as a kid. It was quite a thrill, and something that every scout troop, church, club, bar, or school could sponsor a bus trip for. Even in college, I have fond memories of sitting in the outfield of Veteran's stadium, drinking cheap Schlitz beer, and not spending $20 on the whole day.

I just wonder if there will be another generation of baseball fans. If you look at a telecast, you don't see a lot of 10 year-old kids in the audience...and even fewer who are not playing video games.



Agree completely - but every game I go to has tons of kids. Dunno which game your watching?

/Go Nats!
 
2012-09-12 12:05:29 PM

UberDave: You know what will bring the crowds?


Ten Cent Beer Night?
 
2012-09-12 12:05:37 PM

thecpt: SuperT: baseball needs to ditch the local blackout rules. I want to be able to buy mlb.tv for a year and get ALL the games. if you don't let me have my local games(without some proxy trickery)... what the fark is the point?

This a million goddamned times. I want to get rid of cable but keep internet, and this is in the con column when it could easily be a non factor. RLY? Showing me 14 games is easy, but that extra one breaks your bank?

About the trickery... can I just list my area code as Alaska or something?


no, you have to get the ip geolocation to think you are someplace else. This is done via proxies. google it. there are handy dandy guides out there.
 
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