If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Consumerist)   Dear Consumerist: Sprint didn't monitor my data usage and then suggest a lower plan that would save me money. Should I get a refund?   (consumerist.com) divider line 67
    More: Stupid, 2GB, four-wheel-drive, usages  
•       •       •

8118 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Sep 2012 at 4:49 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



67 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-09-11 07:12:02 PM
Of all the people who have been screwed by The Phone Company, this really isn't one of them...
 
kth
2012-09-11 07:17:56 PM

BMFPitt: At what point is someone going to organize some sort of yearly awards ceremony for Consumerist whiners?

TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: Sprint also tends to have the best customer service when surveyed.

They better, since their network is a few steps up from cans and a string.


They've gotten better lately.

It used to be that I couldn't get a signal in my brother's house, which was about a half a mile (a very important half a mile in terms of property values) from the CEO of Sprint. Which always amused the fark out of me.

Now, I'm in the middle of rural Missouri, and get a fairly decent signal.
 
2012-09-11 07:32:00 PM

BronyMedic: Raging Whore Moans: Is it just Fark, or is The Consumerist devolving into an echo chamber of customers proclaiming their always-rightness?

It's always been that way. It's a symptom of the problem that is the mantra of "The Customer is ALWAYS right.". Even when he's a flagrant, dithering idiot who has no clue what he's talking about, or agrees/signs something he was too stupid to read in the first place.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 400x318]

The consumerist just gives a whiny, hipster voice to passive-aggressive, beta consumers who are too chickenshiat to deal with things on their own.

/can you tell I don't like that website?


Whenever people complain about crummy customer service, I have this voice in the back of my head that tells me that it comes from the complete breakdown following years of "the customer is always right." Once that got ingrained into people's heads, they assumed any request, no matter how ridiculous, should be complied with, immediately. After dealing with this sort of attitude for long enough, disempowered employees retaliated by not giving a shiat about even normal and proper complaints.
 
2012-09-11 07:36:28 PM
Straight Talk - $45 unlimited everything. I've been with them for 6 months and have been really happy. 3G is fast enough to watch Netflix in most locations, GPS, unlimited texting, unlimited talk, Android OS. I got fed up with Sprint over the years with various b.s. fees, taxes, etc.
 
2012-09-11 08:17:31 PM

scottydoesntknow: Dear FARK: please stop greenlighting these dumbass Consumerist articles.


please let us know where you are and we will send help. obviously someone is holding a machete to your throat, forcing you to read the Fark posts you consider dumbass.

/you poor baby
//we are all worried about you
///truly, deeply concerned
 
2012-09-11 09:14:52 PM
Personally, I consider these types of posts to be sanity checks on Consumerist. It helps keep them honest and helps their readers keep things in perspective.
 
2012-09-11 09:22:05 PM

sigdiamond2000: Has anyone noticed a perceptible shift in the way The Consumerist responds to these e-mails now that they've basically become the laughing stock of Fark and elsewhere?

More often than not recently they tend to, if not side with the business, at least point out that the e-mailer is being kind of whiny about it. 

I'd like to think Fark has played some small part in this.


I suspect that it has something to do with some Farkers becoming semi-regulars over there and playing enough Devil's Advocate to chase away the more insane super-consumers.
 
2012-09-11 09:49:36 PM
I think Pocket Ninja summed this up very well

/realized hey, i'm not using the damn hotspot, guess what I dropped it.
 
2012-09-11 09:54:59 PM

InspectorZero: Next time I get a party tray of Buffalo wings, I'll take the leftovers back to the shop and demand a proration.


I wasn't aware that me buying a data plan prevented other people from using the bandwidth related to the plan. Oh wait, it doesn't. And Sprint won't even guarantee that all the data I paid for will be available over the network; if a restaurant wouldn't guarantee that all the wings I paid for are actually available I sure wouldn't agree to pay for them up-front.

I agree, this particular complaint is a bit entitled, but Sprint certainly has the capability to make their billing more fair -- if they aren't going to refund for underages they shouldn't charge insane rates for overages either (particularly without confirmation that you want to pay for the extra usage).
 
2012-09-11 10:07:04 PM

SpaceyStacey: what_now: You know what's funny? Several years ago, when I opened up an absurd bill, I called Sprint and the lady said I'd gone over my texting by a huge amount. So, she suggested I pay an extra $5 a month and get 500 more texts. And then she reduced the overage charge, because this had never happened before and I'm a good customer.

I have a feeling it had a lot to do with the fact that I was polite and treated her like a human being, instead of being an absolute cock about it, like this person probably was.

This happened to me with AT&T last year. I didn't realize my texting plan didn't include sending pictures, so while on vacation I was sending people pictures like crazy. A few weeks after I got home, I got my phone bill and it was $350. I called up, explained what I had done, the CSR explained what had happened. Since I wasn't a nightmare about it and was calm and nice to her, she retroactively gave me a texting plan that included pictures and wiped all the extra charges off my bill.


This is a basic upsell, like the classic "the first hit's free" drug dealer. For phone company, getting anyone to upgrade to a higher subscription is always better than forcing a one-time charge on them, because they'll always forget to downgrade the plan when they don't need it anymore. Now your customer is paying dollars more for cents worth of usage, and feels good about it! You can't beat that.

In fact, I think AT&T invented that scam back in the old Ma Bell days, but don't take my word on it.
 
2012-09-11 10:32:26 PM

what_now: You know what's funny? Several years ago, when I opened up an absurd bill, I called Sprint and the lady said I'd gone over my texting by a huge amount. So, she suggested I pay an extra $5 a month and get 500 more texts. And then she reduced the overage charge, because this had never happened before and I'm a good customer.

I have a feeling it had a lot to do with the fact that I was polite and treated her like a human being, instead of being an absolute cock about it, like this person probably was.


I've worked Sprint Customer Service before, for 2 years. In a complaint department actually.

We had authority to credit up to $500 back on a bill for overages if the customer actually changed their price plan to ensure it wouldn't happen again. We could technically go up to $5000, but only with management approval, which they were shy to give. Anything beyond that would have to go up to corporate.

We had people who refused to believe the messages were even sent. We had dozens and dozens of cases like "My Daughter doesn't text message! She's only 12, I gave her that phone for emergencies! She didn't send 2000 text messages in a month!" In those cases, no credit would ever be given. They didn't seem to understand that just refusing to admit it happened wouldn't get them out of the charge. We couldn't volunteer the information that if they put a texting plan on the line, we could credit back the charges. We were only supposed to offer half the charges up front, but if they pushed we could credit it all back. Some reps gave away more than they were supposed to like that, corporate hated it, griped at us constantly for giving away too much money.

Yeah, if you were a cock, no, you wouldn't get shiat, but if you were nice and cooperative, we could do a lot for you. Our stock phrase for that was "I am sorry Sir/Ma'am, but all charges are valid, and no credit is due. Thank you for choosing Sprint."
 
2012-09-11 11:52:14 PM

foxyshadis: SpaceyStacey: what_now: You know what's funny? Several years ago, when I opened up an absurd bill, I called Sprint and the lady said I'd gone over my texting by a huge amount. So, she suggested I pay an extra $5 a month and get 500 more texts. And then she reduced the overage charge, because this had never happened before and I'm a good customer.

I have a feeling it had a lot to do with the fact that I was polite and treated her like a human being, instead of being an absolute cock about it, like this person probably was.

This happened to me with AT&T last year. I didn't realize my texting plan didn't include sending pictures, so while on vacation I was sending people pictures like crazy. A few weeks after I got home, I got my phone bill and it was $350. I called up, explained what I had done, the CSR explained what had happened. Since I wasn't a nightmare about it and was calm and nice to her, she retroactively gave me a texting plan that included pictures and wiped all the extra charges off my bill.

This is a basic upsell, like the classic "the first hit's free" drug dealer. For phone company, getting anyone to upgrade to a higher subscription is always better than forcing a one-time charge on them, because they'll always forget to downgrade the plan when they don't need it anymore. Now your customer is paying dollars more for cents worth of usage, and feels good about it! You can't beat that.

In fact, I think AT&T invented that scam back in the old Ma Bell days, but don't take my word on it.


Well, since it was $5/month to have unlimited texting, picture texting too, I figured it was worth it. Much better than the $350 one time huge bill, and getting charged for every text that I sent and that I received.

You are right though, that the companies count on customers forgetting to downgrade their plans when they aren't needed anymore. Back when I had Cingular, and the Razr phone, I paid extra on my plan for some sort of data plan (it was so long ago I forgot exactly what it was for). I got rid of that phone, got the iPhone 3 and had it for 2 years before I went to change something on that plan when the CSR asked if I still had my Razr and if it still worked. Since that phone was long gone, I asked what he was talking about and he showed me my plans, and I was still being charged extra for the data plan on a phone I didn't have any more. My own mistake, but still frustrating.
 
2012-09-12 12:44:51 AM
What's getting Redlit so things like this can get Greenlit?
 
2012-09-12 12:46:02 AM
wait..i thought all those tinfoilers over there couldn't afford a cell phone and all went prepaid...now i'm really confused.. but i refuse to click link to find out
/ohh well
 
2012-09-12 02:04:42 AM
Sprint's website actually has an "analyze my plan" tool that will tell you if you should change plans.

I don't know if it works because it's never told me anything except "your plan is a good fit for you."
 
2012-09-12 02:49:24 AM

kab: "She said Sprint does not have "the manpower" to notify customers of pricing changes that would be in their favor."

More like "they don't feel like notifying you of a price change that would be in your favor".

Case in point... AT&T telling you that you HAVE to have a data plan with them if you have a smart phone. Which actually, as it turns out, isn't true at all.


Actually, it is. Short story: if you have a smart phone and don't, they'll automatically add a data plan randomly and with no warning or notification. Every month it will be a huge hassle to try and get them to take it off. That's even assuming you're grand-fathered in with an agreement where you don't need a data plan. Look forward to spending hours either at their store or on the phone with those assholes. AT&T is the worst company I have ever had to deal with in my entire life.

Long story:

Before they came up with that policy, my family all got refurb Blackberrys with AT&T. The phones were cheap, and great for texting, but we had no use for any kind of data plan, so we didn't get one.

Fast forward like a year or so, we're in the middle of our contract and they start saying everyone with a smartphone needs a data plan. We're fine, grand-fathered in, not like they can change the terms of our deal in the middle, right? We check with them to be sure, and everything is good, we don't need one.

Another month or two goes by. "Huh, that's odd, why is there a charge for data plans on our phones?" *call AT&T, 5 hours later, finally we get it taken off* Rinse and repeat every month or two for the remainder of our contract. Sometimes they'll take it off, sometimes they just stick to their script and say "no, you need one". Go into the store, it's the same crap-shoot. Sometimes one person will take it off, sometimes not, but either way it's a huge pain in the ass.

Lots more crap happened, I'll stop there. In short, don't even bother, AT&T will make your life hell if you even try. Just avoid them like the plague.

Will never get another cell phone contract as long as I live. Now I have T-Mobile, pay month-to-month, no contract. I have to buy the phone out-of-pocket, but it's much cheaper so I've already paid the (very nice) phone off in savings after less than a year.
 
2012-09-12 08:47:47 AM
The tiered system is much like a chinese buffet. You pay for it, then use what you want. Some go over, some go under, it all evens out. Where this lady might have a complaint, is that imagine if you went to a chinese buffet, and when you're paying the bill, the guy in front of you pays $7 and you pay $9, simply because you've eaten there before.

As far as monitoring her usage and such, that's simply a service she is wishing they would perform. But, a simple "Your plan no longer exists, check out our two new plans" email isn't asking too much, IMO. This is the way many people assume businesses operate, that they advertise their products to the customers. They're clearly wrong, but it's still the assumption many people make. But they do fail to remember, a business isn't there to provide you a service, it exists solely for their own benefit, to make money. It's why Hardee's sells a $1 chicken sammich, but it isn't on the menu. You just have to know it exists and ask for it. They don't wanna give you a $1 out, they want you to buy their $5 burgers, but they still keep it cuz it draws people like me in. They don't make money on the sammich, but will when I get fries and a drink. A business will ALWAYS set itself up in its own favor.
 
Displayed 17 of 67 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report