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(Gothamist)   Teenager wins $14.5 million from the company that made the baseball bat that hit the ball that struck him, spilling his hot coffee onto very expensive pants, hit the pole and dropped the net onto his plastic mice   (gothamist.com ) divider line
    More: Asinine, Sports Authority, Louisville Slugger, a hit, hockey sticks, daily life, Little League, time trials  
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3467 clicks; posted to Sports » on 11 Sep 2012 at 4:10 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-12 08:29:00 AM  

badscooter: lunchinlewis: PsyLord: While this is a tragic accident that happened to the kid, it's part of the game. You are the pitcher. You are in direct line with the path of a baseball if hit. Was it illegal to use a metal bat at that time (the article didn't say)? If so, then it's the league's fault, not the bat manufacturer's fault - I'm surprised that the gun manufacturers aren't balking at this ruling.

Thing is, it has nothing to do with the bat (or very little). It's a condition that has happened in other sports (lacrosse for example), where a couple kids have died after getting hit in the chest at just the right spot at just the right time.

Rather than change the bats or blame the bats, they should look into making the pitchers, maybe all the infielders, wear a chest protector under their uniforms. It doesn't have to be anything big or bulky.

They already make something.

[i.imgur.com image 240x180]


pfft, well there you go. My work here is done.
 
2012-09-12 11:47:06 AM  

The Gordie Howe Hat Trick: I'm sure his parents would much rather have a normal kid than any amount of money.


Sure. But that doesn't justify this terrible outcome. Parents should sue themselves for letting their snowflake play a sport.
 
2012-09-12 01:07:25 PM  

ladodger34: The articles on this were severely lacking in details, but I wonder if the parents went after LS because they misrepresented the performance of the bat. For the last 15-20 years or so, most leagues that use metal bats require that they be under a certain Bat Performance Rating (BPF for short). One of the problems is that for a long time, the manufacturer did the testing. It wasn't until fairly recently that independent labs did any testing. More than a few bats were found to have a higher bpf than what the manufacturer was reporting.

For those of us that played ball in the 80s and early 90s and used metal bats, modern bats are way the hell better than what we used. I have a bat that is probably 20-25 years old that is deader than wood. A newer metal bat would never have that problem.


Most likely it was a composite bat, as they have largely replaced aluminum ones over the past few years. The issue with them is that they improve (in other words, the ball comes off faster) as they are broken in (the material has more give, increasing the trampoline effect). So a bat with a BPF of 1.2 out of the wrapper could conceivably become a 1.3 (making up numbers) midway throught the season. Aluminum bats, on the other hand, do not improve with age, and will actually degrade as the aluminum distorts.

As was mentioned, the biggest issue was not so much the bat, as where and when the kid was hit. 1/100th of a second sooner or later and he would have only ended up with a bruise.
 
2012-09-12 05:34:16 PM  

Manute Bol: ladodger34: The articles on this were severely lacking in details, but I wonder if the parents went after LS because they misrepresented the performance of the bat. For the last 15-20 years or so, most leagues that use metal bats require that they be under a certain Bat Performance Rating (BPF for short). One of the problems is that for a long time, the manufacturer did the testing. It wasn't until fairly recently that independent labs did any testing. More than a few bats were found to have a higher bpf than what the manufacturer was reporting.

For those of us that played ball in the 80s and early 90s and used metal bats, modern bats are way the hell better than what we used. I have a bat that is probably 20-25 years old that is deader than wood. A newer metal bat would never have that problem.

Most likely it was a composite bat, as they have largely replaced aluminum ones over the past few years. The issue with them is that they improve (in other words, the ball comes off faster) as they are broken in (the material has more give, increasing the trampoline effect). So a bat with a BPF of 1.2 out of the wrapper could conceivably become a 1.3 (making up numbers) midway throught the season. Aluminum bats, on the other hand, do not improve with age, and will actually degrade as the aluminum distorts.

As was mentioned, the biggest issue was not so much the bat, as where and when the kid was hit. 1/100th of a second sooner or later and he would have only ended up with a bruise.


This right here... Most people don't know anything about bats today. You know letters like BPF and BBCOR and numbers like 1.20 BPF and 1.15 BPF and .50 BBCOR or what Advanced Break In testing (ABI) is and everyone gets lost.

All "little league" bats must comply with the new 1.15 BPF standard as set forth by LL International and USSSA (United States Speciality Sports Association). These bats are tested using ABI to assure they aren't going to get much if any past the standard's limits before breaking down. The bats are rolled to break them in before they are tested.

All bats used in middle school, high school, and college must conform to the even.stricter .50 BBCOR standard. BBCOR stands for Baseball Coefficient of Rebound. It states that the ball can not come off any faster than 50% of what it came in at... When held stationary.

The only sport still allowing the 1.20bpf standard is softball. USSSA,NSA, ISF for both slowpitch and fast pitch... WSL and GSL for slowpitch only. ASA has a 98 mph bat standard for all forms of softball. The main difference between associations in softball are the ball specs.
 
2012-09-13 10:09:13 AM  

JSam21: Manute Bol: ladodger34: The articles on this were severely lacking in details, but I wonder if the parents went after LS because they misrepresented the performance of the bat. For the last 15-20 years or so, most leagues that use metal bats require that they be under a certain Bat Performance Rating (BPF for short). One of the problems is that for a long time, the manufacturer did the testing. It wasn't until fairly recently that independent labs did any testing. More than a few bats were found to have a higher bpf than what the manufacturer was reporting.

For those of us that played ball in the 80s and early 90s and used metal bats, modern bats are way the hell better than what we used. I have a bat that is probably 20-25 years old that is deader than wood. A newer metal bat would never have that problem.

Most likely it was a composite bat, as they have largely replaced aluminum ones over the past few years. The issue with them is that they improve (in other words, the ball comes off faster) as they are broken in (the material has more give, increasing the trampoline effect). So a bat with a BPF of 1.2 out of the wrapper could conceivably become a 1.3 (making up numbers) midway throught the season. Aluminum bats, on the other hand, do not improve with age, and will actually degrade as the aluminum distorts.

As was mentioned, the biggest issue was not so much the bat, as where and when the kid was hit. 1/100th of a second sooner or later and he would have only ended up with a bruise.

This right here... Most people don't know anything about bats today. You know letters like BPF and BBCOR and numbers like 1.20 BPF and 1.15 BPF and .50 BBCOR or what Advanced Break In testing (ABI) is and everyone gets lost.

All "little league" bats must comply with the new 1.15 BPF standard as set forth by LL International and USSSA (United States Speciality Sports Association). These bats are tested using ABI to assure they aren't going to get much if any past the standard's lim ...


That's another good point--nobody talks about the role that the compression rating of the ball plays. I've hit some that are so tight they come off the bat like a golf ball. Switch to a restricted flight-type ball and almost all of the benefits of composite bats are eliminated.

/side-note: I was fortunate enough to take BP in the Citizen's Bank hitting tunnel, and they had composite bats for us to use. The sound and feel of the bat was very much like wood.
 
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