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(Den Of Geek)   The plot problems facing an Independence Day sequel   (denofgeek.com) divider line 49
    More: Interesting, Independence Days, Independence Day sequels, Roland Emmerich, Bill Pullman, resistance group, Jeff Goldblum, alien invasion, sequels  
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18111 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Sep 2012 at 10:36 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-09-11 10:47:05 AM
6 votes:
The biggest complaint about the original was that the virus worked on the alien computers. This is commonly called one of the biggest plot holes. I agreed until I saw the deleted scene where Bren Spiners character explains to Jeff Goldblum that we only have computers thanks to the roswell crash. We reverse engineered all of our systems from the ships computer. So it would make sense that there would be come compatibility.

That's a rather important point. Why the hell did they delete it from the final cut?
2012-09-11 11:50:55 AM
3 votes:
I just pretend that District 9 is the sequel. Just like I pretend the Terminator movies are a prequel to The Matrix.
2012-09-11 11:48:42 AM
3 votes:
My two cents for a plot:

-The aliens when they arrived on Earth were actually fleeing annhiliation by another (2nd) alien race. That (2nd) alien race shows up and is not too friendly to humans: "Ours is a religious conflict, we will not stop until we are the only life form in the universe." Humans may have to ally with 1st aliens in order to survive.

Subplot:

-North Korea, Iran, Iraq, not so nice countries now have access to advanced alien weapons technology. This upsets the world power balance as most of the U.S. and its allies military power was destroyed in the opening days of the alien invasion. Third world countries weren't hit that bad as they were secondary targets so now they have a great deal of economic and military power. U.S. is rebuilding but is struggling and is at war with a few other countries.

-Aliens survived and conduct guerilla campaigns throughout the world. They have human supporters and sympathizers. Through telepathy and mind control devices there are sleeper agents in key government, military, etc.,. positions that are helpign the aliens.

-Some aliens try diplomacy, "give us a continent and we will rebuild earth and share our advanced tech"

-U.S. is ravaged and splintered due to a civil war. The East adn West coast were hit the hardest but the central "fly over" states were relatively unaffected. Resources are limited and it becomes teh haves vs. have nots. Survivors form gangs seeking food and supplies, militias form to defend food and supplies. A hero emerges? A new president tries to unite teh country again and succeeds just in time to stop teh 2nd alien invasion.
2012-09-11 12:39:53 PM
2 votes:
Seriously? Why does every movie in existence suddenly need a sequel? Just let it go. This was a good movie ON ITS OWN. That's it, end of story. Come up with a new, fresh idea, or if you are going to come up with a recycled idea (Like Independence Day actually was), find a way to make it fun. Just don't do yet another sequel, especially since it's been this farking long. You're losing everything cultural that made the movie work at the time. It fit into a nice niche, and wouldn't really fly today anyway. Don't fark it up with a sequel, I beg of you.
2012-09-11 12:20:22 PM
2 votes:
images1.wikia.nocookie.net

We did it. We defeated the invaders and left their ships in ruins.
Deep inside those ruins was a single stone that would change the course of our
history forever.
On the stone was etched a galactic map
and a single word more ancient than civilization itself:
Hiigara.
Our home.
The world was united and a massive colony ship was designed.
Construction would take 60 years.
It would demand new technologies, new industries and new sacrifices...
2012-09-11 12:18:57 PM
2 votes:
And since it's an Independence Day thread, I need to repeat my BIGGEST gripe with the film:

Randy Quaid is all drunk and stupid because he claims to have been abducted. Everyone laughs at him. Even his children!

Then they get invaded by aliens!!!!

So he says "I'll fly a jet, because I'm looking for some payback from when they abducted me"

And everyone laughs and rolls their eyes at him!!

Why??? He claims to be abducted and now they're being attacked BY ALIENS!

They all owe him an apology!!!
2012-09-11 11:22:08 AM
2 votes:

MagSeven: The alien's anitvirus auto-updated?


They were using McAfee, and the update still can't identify the virus.

In other news, article writers who need to make a deadline sometimes overthink "popcorn" movies in an effort to publish material on geek sites.

I would like to comment on something: Destroying 15 major cities would have far less impact on the human race than you might imagine. Far more infrastructure exists outside of those cities. Food production, industry, power plants... none of those are found major cities. Banks, lawyers, hipsters (lots of hipsters) live in cities, and I think we can all agree the world might even be a better place without all that.

Can anybody on Fark name something CRITICAL to the human race that might have been destroyed by these aliens in one of those 15 cities?

If anything, the Earth might benefit from the population reduction.
2012-09-11 11:05:55 AM
2 votes:

padraig: loonatic112358: FirstNationalBastard: Well, first, wouldn't the people of Earf already be prepared for another invasion?

Not so much, if there was a second wave closely follwing the first, the earf would be easier to take down

Am I the only to remember them saying at one point, that the whole alien population just jumped from planet to planet, and therefore were all here ? Or am I mistaking it with an other movie ?


That's what I thought, too. IMDB backs that up:

President Thomas Whitmore: I saw... its thoughts. I saw what they're planning to do. They're like locusts. They're moving from planet to planet... their whole civilization. After they've consumed every natural resource they move on... and we're next. Nuke 'em. Let's nuke the bastards.

So there's no cavalry, no backup. That was it.
2012-09-11 10:38:17 AM
2 votes:
DRFTA, but I'm guessing the entire, lengthy list is something like:

1. It was a closed story, and writers have nowhere to go with it.

End of list.
2012-09-11 10:52:12 PM
1 votes:

The_Time_Master: dittybopper: Goldblum's character figures out their encoding scheme fairly early. He *KNOWS* how they send numbers. They are using some sort of conventional radio to communicate (they hijack our satellites for that purpose, remember?), and we have operating computers on the captured spacecraft. At that point, it's just a matter of black-box testing to figure out what base-level machine language commands you need to use to write a very simple virus that simply overwhelms the alien computers.

HACKERS was not a documentary.


Dude, I've been writing software for a living for just about two decades now. Before that, I wrote software for fun. I bought my first computer in 1983. I was in the signals intelligence business. I used to play core wars.

You don't seem realize that a virus can be very simple, just a couple of instructions.
2012-09-11 10:06:11 PM
1 votes:
It seems like these "plot holes" are pretty easy to explain.
2012-09-11 05:30:36 PM
1 votes:
Here's an idea -

Turn the sequel into an adaptation of Greg Bear's Anvil of Stars
2012-09-11 05:02:47 PM
1 votes:
A few things I thought of concerning an ID sequel:

1. Toxic and radioactive materials from the spaceships. A several mile long spacecraft probably doesn't run on clean energy, and the burning materials might have some other crap not healthy for human (or aliens).

2. Because of its proximity to the finale (and lack of it to other possible surviving cities) the world economy being devastated, its travel know-how and a large amount of huge, empty buildings, Las Vegas would probably be the new US capital and UN headquarters. With all its kitsch to old, long-gone places like Paris, Rome, NY and Cairo, probably fitting. (BTW, ever notice there's no casino that has a D.C. motif?)

3. Just how did the folks in Africa (or wherever the jungle scene was) bring down that ship? Not exactly a plethora of jet aircraft on the continent if you knock around Egypt and South Africa. SCUD? Don't think the average RPG-7 or technical with an AA gun has the range or power to hit that energy gun in the middle of the ship.

4. Alien survivor resistance. Barring a ship withdrawing from human contact (floating over the middle of the oceans or Antarctica) they likely don't have food and supplies for a long entrenched fight. Also diseases become a factor; the main ship might have offered labs or medical facilities to deal with such problems.

5. Co-operation. The EU, Israelis, Japanese, Chinese and Russians may know that the US did have alien tech for decades. Might be a point of contention. Also, if a developing third world country (one with a decent amount of brains -- Pakistan or India, a former Soviet republic, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, Iran) came into a treasure trove of working alien tech, would they share it, use it to take advantage of neighbors or the surviving populace at large?
2012-09-11 04:42:22 PM
1 votes:

robohobo: I'm now reminded of the Worldwar/Colonization/Homeward Bound series. Though by HB it was getting pretty shiatty. It was still awesome to see Earf drop down on Home to swing our collective dick in the Race's face.

/time for a re-read...a long, often repetitive re-read


You just described most of Turtledove's series. The man has to not only make a point, but make it a minimum of 3 times per book, in every book of the series. Yes, we get it, in a world where the USA and CSA are at war with each other a lot, US tobacco sucks. Got it. Dudes with pale skin get sunburn. Understood. If he didn't constantly repeat himself, he could write the series in about a third of the time.
2012-09-11 03:56:38 PM
1 votes:

Disposable Rob: thecpt: Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: That in itself is a plot hole. The Roswell Crash was in 1948. The movie was set almost 50 years later. Plenty of time for the aliens to improve their computers. And then there's how "reverse engineered" is never as good as the original.

Maybe it was a standard platform that was designated to be left alone? You wouldn't want incompatible systems when you could be light years apart, and might not see each other for 50 years.

That's my thought as well. It was a combination of the requirements for some EXTREMELY standardized systems, relying on over-automated systems due to being developed by a hivemind, and a "it's good enough, we'll patch it later" attitude on a particulary vunerable system.


I'd also argue that it's quite difficult to advance you tech when your stuck on a spaceship with set systems, and no resources to do further R&D.
2012-09-11 02:26:31 PM
1 votes:

Rwa2play: The aliens destroyed NORAD IIRC, where most of the President's cabinet had gone


Sooo... a bunch of political appointees who rarely know anything about the departments they head are gone? What's the problem there? Some Director or Assistant Director would take over their agency.

Why do we place so much importance on individuals, particularly politicians?


liam76: As for financial centers, most banks decentralize their data; NYC HQ buildings are great for execs, but the meat of the banking business is in data centers in the heartland

Yeah, but see above. Without thos eexecs that money isn't goping anywhere.

/replace money with any other "good" that has a central hub in those cities.


Well, for starters, you aren't getting all of the execs in one shot, anyway. Many will be based in regional offices (and move up to take control of the company). It won't be smooth, sure, but there will be continuity. Likewise, while large capital monetary moves would be temporarily stymied, I doubt there would be much disruption to daily cash transfers through ATMs and such.... the data centers would be untouched, located in the middle of BFE as most are.

Remember, as a society, we've decentralized a lot of critical "virtual" infrastructure because we spent 40 years in a cold war, worrying about nuclear war destroying those same cities the aliens did in ID4. Cites are the great misidrection.... even military bases are supported by supply depots in the middle of nowhere. There have always been recovery plans for the possibility that all of our cities were wiped out, ID4-style.

Europe and Japan (and maybe India) would probably have the biggest loss from a tech perspective. The rest of the world, not so much.
2012-09-11 02:06:09 PM
1 votes:

shifter_: loonatic112358: FirstNationalBastard: Ah, but Earf would find a way to repel the invasion.

with what resources, they sort of used up most of what they had in the end there, if the 2nd fleet was within a year or two of the first, they'd find an earth still struggling to repair itself

decimated population, many military installations gone, much of the manufacturing capacity gone, mind you Detroit should still be ok, as the author points out a very cold winter from the smoking ruins of the crashed ships,

You could maybe do a survival and rebuild series off that, ending with the earflings getting off this rock to find out what's out there

Except there is no second wave..... the president clearly said, after being in telepathic link, that it was thier entire society, moving from one location to the next..... We doomed yet another species to extinction, which we have actually been quite good at for a while! A broader idea would be survivors of the alien crash fighting earth forces in ground battles.


Easy ways around that. Hive mind aliens so anyone not part of their hive is not their society. Could be plenty of other groups out there.

It also doesn't make much sense for there to only be one mother ship. Keeping with the bug/hive mind idea, bugs can swarm and split their colonies so not far fetched to think there would be more out there. Since these are intelligent beings it is more reasonable to assume they sent the soldiers of the group in to take out the only threat in the system while the workers and/or more fighters would come in later or have already started working elsewhere in system to gather resources.
2012-09-11 02:06:04 PM
1 votes:

robohobo: Of course we do. They threw the first punch. And if someone can lampshade them better than us, more power to them. Us or them, it's pretty simple. No quietly cheering on, we flat out help the fark out of them. And then take out them too, steal their tech. It's a cold universe, out there.


DarkPascual: Who is to judge what is right and what is wrong? Great and powerful foes surround us; unknown miscreants gnaw at us from within. We are threatened with total annihilation. In days such as these we can afford no luxury of morality.

Some may question your right to destroy ten billion people. But those who understand realise that you have no right to let them live.



Of course one thing you can do is use the first movie for a basis for several movies on how Earth builds a galactic empire by liberating oppressed alien races.
2012-09-11 01:45:11 PM
1 votes:

meanmutton: NeoCortex42: Disposable Rob: That article officially thought more about consequnces of the plot than Dean Devlin ever did.

Speaking of Dean Devlin movies, I want my Stargate sequel. They kept kicking around the idea of a direct sequel to the movie, ignoring SG-1. I would love to see what they had planned for that.

They did three movies, three TV series (totaling nearly 400 episodes), and an animated series (26 episodes). I think they've explored the Stargate universe pretty well, frankly.


They changed so much of the mythos in the transition from film to TV, that the original creators of the movie had been wanting to do a proper sequel film for a long time. I don't see it ever happening, but I think it would be pretty cool.
2012-09-11 01:17:54 PM
1 votes:

padraig: loonatic112358: FirstNationalBastard: Well, first, wouldn't the people of Earf already be prepared for another invasion?

Not so much, if there was a second wave closely follwing the first, the earf would be easier to take down

Am I the only to remember them saying at one point, that the whole alien population just jumped from planet to planet, and therefore were all here ? Or am I mistaking it with an other movie ?


Yes, any sequel would either have to be about dealing with the remaining survivors of the fleet (possibly with some minor assistance from scout ships like the ones that kept up with Earth that would now be scouting the next target) or rewrite what was understood in the first film. This Fleet was supposed to be their entire race.
2012-09-11 01:10:56 PM
1 votes:
"Alternatively, poorer nations that had been largely ignored by the aliens during the initial extermination phase might rise up to seize their opportunity in the post-apocalyptic nightmare. Western nations, on their knees, are in thrall to them because their infrastructure no longer exists. World order changes totally. Unity should have been the result, but instead the people of Earth are even more fractured than they were before."

media.moddb.com

No, peace through Brotherhood
2012-09-11 01:05:37 PM
1 votes:

Quaker: way south: robohobo: Quaker: way south: /The one thing that earth has which you cant find elsewhere is a large slave labor population.

Except that it's reasonable to assume that any alien race that is technologically advanced enough to get here in the first place would also be fully capable of building a robotic labor force which would be able to outperform human beings in every way.

But it's more fun to make people do it. For the drama.

/and the kicks

Also, you have to buy the robots.
Humans are free for the taking.

There would be an inherent cost in that the aliens would have to come to Earth, conquer humanity, and then maintain a presence to keep us working. Considering how much more efficient robots would be at labor in the first place (stronger, faster, smarter, more trustworthy, no need for extended rest periods, etc.), the cost-benefit analysis would still make a robot labor force a much more practical option.


You're assuming the aliens have a vested interest in keeping humans alive. They may take joy in just working us to death. A ' just for the lulz' situation. Don't think black slavery, where there was aan incentive to keep them ambulatory, just think 'disposable toy slavery'. If I have 4 or 5 billion whores, it's okay if I break double handfuls of them, cause hey, it's just for kicks. Also their telepathy, easy to control most folk.
2012-09-11 01:04:54 PM
1 votes:
Here's an idea for a sequel. One of the saucers crashes relatively unscathed, and Earth spends the next 20-50 years studying it, learning its technology, implementing it in our fighter jets, and getting it to work again... an entire city builds around the wreck in the process.

On the day they turn it back on, it signals them to come back, this time with their more humanlike overlords in tow. War breaks out again, a vapid pop star gets kidnapped, and the ship leaves with the city population to distract the invasion until Earth's ready to retaliate.

Put in a few tragedies, a young hotshot pilot, a cross-species love affair... you got a trilogy on your hands...

/too obscure?
2012-09-11 12:56:10 PM
1 votes:
As really shiatty a movie as it is, it could go down as one of the greats as long as they *never* make the sequel that involves more aliens and shiat blowing up.

Here's a much better idea: Why not do a limited TV series on how humanity coped with rebuilding?
2012-09-11 12:44:47 PM
1 votes:
This guy would be most likely to figure out a story line for the sequel:

sheldoncooper.net
2012-09-11 12:43:50 PM
1 votes:

Antimatter: dittybopper: buntz: You know, just by killing the boss and blowing up his headquarters doesn't end the war

Actually, sometimes it does. I can think of numerous examples from history.

It works when you have a nation state willing to give up and order its forces to surrender. Not so effective when you are facing an enemy with nothing to lose and no rules governor what's acceptable in war. Once cannot describe how incredibly brutal a conflict like this would be in real life.


Who has nothing to lose in Star Wars? The Empire was held together strictly by force of will of Palpatine. It's the stormtroopers who have much to lose. They have no one to give them orders anymore: The Senate is (presumably) still dissolved from ANH, their boss is dead, and so is his presumed second-in-command.

What do the Imperial forces have to gain by continuing the fight? Especially since a democratic form of government could be rolled back into place on the model of the old republic that was only dissolved within living memory, at most 25 years earlier, perhaps with more protections against giving the executive too much power.
2012-09-11 12:20:25 PM
1 votes:

way south: /The one thing that earth has which you cant find elsewhere is a large slave labor population.


Except that it's reasonable to assume that any alien race that is technologically advanced enough to get here in the first place would also be fully capable of building a robotic labor force which would be able to outperform human beings in every way.
2012-09-11 12:13:33 PM
1 votes:

dittybopper: buntz: You know, just by killing the boss and blowing up his headquarters doesn't end the war

Actually, sometimes it does. I can think of numerous examples from history.


It works when you have a nation state willing to give up and order its forces to surrender. Not so effective when you are facing an enemy with nothing to lose and no rules governor what's acceptable in war. Once cannot describe how incredibly brutal a conflict like this would be in real life.
2012-09-11 12:12:44 PM
1 votes:
also, this movie is a HUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUGE guilty pleasure. It is so cheesy and melodramatic but also cool and compelling. Hell i even tear up sometimes!
2012-09-11 12:03:14 PM
1 votes:

NeoCortex42: Speaking of Dean Devlin movies, I want my Stargate sequel.


That would be awesome.

Col. Jack O'Niell (Kurt Russell) goes back through the gate and finds a highly civilized society. He also learns Dr. Daniel Jackson (James Spader) has become a lawyer, and has partnered with Admiral James T. Kirk (William Shatner) - who ended up at the same place via the temporal flux. The three sit down for a de-briefing on the balcony of Jackson's apartment, smoke cigars, and drink brandy. Kirk - as usual - sleeps over. O'Neill finally puts that bullet in his head after 10 minutes with both.

The End. 

/Denny Crane - name's on the door
2012-09-11 12:03:07 PM
1 votes:
Plot setup:

Done as a cold war style movie. Aliens have two forces, the ones in what's left of the crippled mothership, which lost most of it's military capacity in the initial strike and the humans nuclear attack. the ship is crippled, but functional, but strangely silent. It's thought the aliens are trying to do what repairs they can, while coming up with an attack strategy. They need the planet, as they have no other way to get resources. the other group o aliens are surviving motherships, and the alien forces who abandoned ship as they went down. they are fighting a guerrilla war/war like the japanese hold outs in WWII. Lots of hit and run attacks, sabotage, etc. there are signs the aliens are rebuilding their ship, but otherwise, there is no immediate signs of a second invasion force.

Human forces are in disarray. Most nations are under effective martial law still, in many areas, due to the constant threat form alien ground forces, and shattered government institutions. With so much to rebuild, unemployment is basically nill, as anyone who isn't working something important is basically ether in a militia, or salvaging/rebuilding. Times are very tough, and even years later, there is still a lot of rationing of goods going on.

More over, there is a constant fear in the populations. Many are hesitant to regroup into massive cities, for fear of drawing another attack. Small towns sprang up all over the map, and people are somewhat scattered, where possible. Flyover country, and other large, open states, say massive population increases as a result. People look tot he skies and dread the site of the mothership, as a sort of omen filled false moon in the sky. Many dooms day groups say the end is nigh, as the aliens will just bombard us from orbit. Scientists and engineers are racing against time and limited budgets to reverse engineer something, anything, to give us protection.

And to make matters worse, their initial victory has drawn extra solar attention, with the amount of signals being detected by folks like SETI growing dramatically. We don't know if someone is just curious, if the aliens have called their own allied forces, or if their enemies seek to exploit this situation.

Movie ends with the mothership, at last showing massive activity, and the long awaited second force, which appears to be a mixmash of ships and ground forces, launching. To make matters worse, the signals seti is getting show that whatever is broadcasting, it's definitely getting closer.
2012-09-11 12:02:31 PM
1 votes:

LesserEvil: MagSeven: The alien's anitvirus auto-updated?

They were using McAfee, and the update still can't identify the virus.

In other news, article writers who need to make a deadline sometimes overthink "popcorn" movies in an effort to publish material on geek sites.

I would like to comment on something: Destroying 15 major cities would have far less impact on the human race than you might imagine. Far more infrastructure exists outside of those cities. Food production, industry, power plants... none of those are found major cities. Banks, lawyers, hipsters (lots of hipsters) live in cities, and I think we can all agree the world might even be a better place without all that.

Can anybody on Fark name something CRITICAL to the human race that might have been destroyed by these aliens in one of those 15 cities?

If anything, the Earth might benefit from the population reduction.


The details of the movie are a little fuzzy at this point, but I think the total destruction of major cities would have been near complete by the end of the movie. They do mention something about worldwide destruction in 48 or 72 hours, I can't recall. At that level of devastation you probably don't have much infrastructure left nationally, if not globally, aside from possibly power, water, food, sewer, communications, roads, and other necessities at the small-town level. At the local level, farmers and small communities can probably pull through, but like any immediate post-apocalyptic scenario, you now have hordes of survivors deprived of food, shelter, and with no background in survival skills (we do live in the information age), and no system of elected government, law enforcement, etc, aside from whatever areas have surviving and coherent military presence.

If the aliens had invaded, say, 1850's USA, then the chaos would probably be a lot less. But in our-technology dependant age, we've become too dependant on our tools and much would be lost in the destruction of only major cities, not everything else. Even if survivors across the US (or any other nation) banded together, the truth is, we've used up so many resources globally that our civilization would never recover.
2012-09-11 11:49:22 AM
1 votes:

Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: That in itself is a plot hole. The Roswell Crash was in 1948. The movie was set almost 50 years later. Plenty of time for the aliens to improve their computers. And then there's how "reverse engineered" is never as good as the original.


Maybe it was a standard platform that was designated to be left alone? You wouldn't want incompatible systems when you could be light years apart, and might not see each other for 50 years.

/did not see deleted scene
2012-09-11 11:49:17 AM
1 votes:

Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: Twigz221: The biggest complaint about the original was that the virus worked on the alien computers. This is commonly called one of the biggest plot holes. I agreed until I saw the deleted scene where Bren Spiners character explains to Jeff Goldblum that we only have computers thanks to the roswell crash. We reverse engineered all of our systems from the ships computer. So it would make sense that there would be come compatibility.

That's a rather important point. Why the hell did they delete it from the final cut?

That in itself is a plot hole. The Roswell Crash was in 1948. The movie was set almost 50 years later. Plenty of time for the aliens to improve their computers. And then there's how "reverse engineered" is never as good as the original.


Actually, from the perspective of the alien "mothership", assuming it was traveling at something close to the speed of light, probably only a few months (maybe a year) have passed. That's why the "old" alien fighter looked just like the "new" fighters.

Relativity, my friend.
2012-09-11 11:40:15 AM
1 votes:

loonatic112358: FirstNationalBastard: Ah, but Earf would find a way to repel the invasion.

with what resources, they sort of used up most of what they had in the end there, if the 2nd fleet was within a year or two of the first, they'd find an earth still struggling to repair itself

decimated population, many military installations gone, much of the manufacturing capacity gone, mind you Detroit should still be ok, as the author points out a very cold winter from the smoking ruins of the crashed ships,

You could maybe do a survival and rebuild series off that, ending with the earflings getting off this rock to find out what's out there


Except there is no second wave..... the president clearly said, after being in telepathic link, that it was thier entire society, moving from one location to the next..... We doomed yet another species to extinction, which we have actually been quite good at for a while! A broader idea would be survivors of the alien crash fighting earth forces in ground battles.
2012-09-11 11:35:47 AM
1 votes:
I don't recall there being a deep reason behind the first independence day invasion... and that wasn't the point really, because it was a star driven movie full of one liners and entertaining scenes. Summer blockbuster fodder that's meant to be watched rather than interpreted by film snobs or sci-fi buffs.

Do they really need a plot for the second movie?
I'd figure it would revolve around taking the war to the aliens and some flippant reasoning behind why they attack other races or maybe why they wanted earth specifically.

Doesn't matter.
It needs to be packed full of star power, humorous one liners and big explosions.
If you can pull it off, I'll be there to turn off my brain and munch popcorn for an hour and a half.

/Transformers had one of the better earth invasion reasoning's, ironically.
/The one thing that earth has which you cant find elsewhere is a large slave labor population.
2012-09-11 11:20:58 AM
1 votes:
The sequel should start literally start 2 minutes where the last one left off.

You really think all of those aliens inside those huge ships where killed when they crashed?

Here's how ID2 starts: Will Smith and Bill Pullman light up those cigars all happy and victorious like. Then they hear a rumbling noise coming from the horizon. They look up only to see a massive alien hoard emerging from the downed spacecraft and charging toward them like the English army in Braveheart.

The cigar falls out of Will Smiths mouth, and we get a dolly-zoom on his face which looks like this:
www.quietofthematinee.com
2012-09-11 11:15:12 AM
1 votes:
It doesn't matter where I am, or what I'm doing - if I happen to see this movie is on TV, I have to sit and down and watch it. I can't help myself. I've done it so many times, I can quote pretty much every line - it boggled my wife's mind the first time I did.
2012-09-11 11:07:43 AM
1 votes:
Interesting that they leave out one major plot issue with the FIRST one: There's zero reason for the big bad aliens to attack the Earth for the reasons given. There is, readily available, far more of the very resources the aliens were after, ripe for the plucking with no messy need for invasion, even before you reach Jupiter. And we're talking about several Earth's worth of water, oxygen, minerals, etc, just sitting out there.
2012-09-11 11:07:06 AM
1 votes:

Twigz221: The biggest complaint about the original was that the virus worked on the alien computers. This is commonly called one of the biggest plot holes. I agreed until I saw the deleted scene where Bren Spiners character explains to Jeff Goldblum that we only have computers thanks to the roswell crash. We reverse engineered all of our systems from the ships computer. So it would make sense that there would be come compatibility.

That's a rather important point. Why the hell did they delete it from the final cut?


Actually, you don't even need that.

Goldblum's character figures out their encoding scheme fairly early. He *KNOWS* how they send numbers. They are using some sort of conventional radio to communicate (they hijack our satellites for that purpose, remember?), and we have operating computers on the captured spacecraft. At that point, it's just a matter of black-box testing to figure out what base-level machine language commands you need to use to write a very simple virus that simply overwhelms the alien computers.

Don't forget that the aliens in ID have a sort-of hive mentality. While looking at external threats, it might never have occurred to them that they might be attacked from within, which is essentially what happens in ID. They wouldn't have even simple virus protections built into their computers because it wouldn't have been something they needed to worry about.

Now, could one person accomplish that in 24 hours? Nope. But a bunch of the best and brightest, with some knowledge of how the alien technology works, and the knowledge of how the aliens encode their data, might be able to. Unfortunately, the movie skips that part, though I understand why.
2012-09-11 11:05:24 AM
1 votes:

Faddy: Twigz221: The biggest complaint about the original was that the virus worked on the alien computers. This is commonly called one of the biggest plot holes. I agreed until I saw the deleted scene where Bren Spiners character explains to Jeff Goldblum that we only have computers thanks to the roswell crash. We reverse engineered all of our systems from the ships computer. So it would make sense that there would be come compatibility.

That's a rather important point. Why the hell did they delete it from the final cut?

Unless they also invented a time machine there were computers before Roswell. Highlighting a stupid plot point would make it worse


Transistors were invented shortly after the Roswell crash, so you see the connection show up in some Alien conspiracies.
2012-09-11 11:04:08 AM
1 votes:

loonatic112358: FirstNationalBastard: Well, first, wouldn't the people of Earf already be prepared for another invasion?

Not so much, if there was a second wave closely follwing the first, the earf would be easier to take down


It's doubtful that another mother ship would be following the path the first one was taking. It's clear from ID that the aliens landed on a planet and strip mined it for the resources, then left for the next one when it was useless. A second ship following the first one would not find untouched planets to consume, so they would take another path through the galaxy. They also wouldn't be close by for the same reason; planets with resources aren't all that common, so they will spread out.

As for the alien ships on Earth after the movie ended, don't forget the hordes of fighters each one disgorged. Each fighter had at least one pilot; did the defenders destroy every single one? It appeared from the ones we saw that the interior of those ships almost certainly was ruined by the feedback and explosion from the main weapon; we see flames and smoke from all over the ships. Plus the impact of megatons of ship crashing into the planet can't be good for the inhabitants either.
2012-09-11 11:03:30 AM
1 votes:

padraig: loonatic112358: FirstNationalBastard: Well, first, wouldn't the people of Earf already be prepared for another invasion?

Not so much, if there was a second wave closely follwing the first, the earf would be easier to take down

Am I the only to remember them saying at one point, that the whole alien population just jumped from planet to planet, and therefore were all here ? Or am I mistaking it with an other movie ?


President Pullman described them as Locusts. They can always say there were more out there. Maybe they "swarm" over entire solar systems and some of them are on Mahs.
2012-09-11 11:00:50 AM
1 votes:

loonatic112358: FirstNationalBastard: Well, first, wouldn't the people of Earf already be prepared for another invasion?

Not so much, if there was a second wave closely follwing the first, the earf would be easier to take down


Am I the only to remember them saying at one point, that the whole alien population just jumped from planet to planet, and therefore were all here ? Or am I mistaking it with an other movie ?
2012-09-11 10:55:08 AM
1 votes:
Somebody greenlit and payed for that steaming pile of plot hole called Battleship, so anything is possible.
2012-09-11 10:47:42 AM
1 votes:

FirstNationalBastard: Ah, but Earf would find a way to repel the invasion.


with what resources, they sort of used up most of what they had in the end there, if the 2nd fleet was within a year or two of the first, they'd find an earth still struggling to repair itself

decimated population, many military installations gone, much of the manufacturing capacity gone, mind you Detroit should still be ok, as the author points out a very cold winter from the smoking ruins of the crashed ships,

You could maybe do a survival and rebuild series off that, ending with the earflings getting off this rock to find out what's out there
2012-09-11 10:43:25 AM
1 votes:
#1 Macs are no longer the Typhoid Marys of the computer world so they couldn't use it as a safe platform to launch the next virus to take down the entire alien fleet because it'd get infected too.
2012-09-11 10:42:55 AM
1 votes:

loonatic112358: FirstNationalBastard: Well, first, wouldn't the people of Earf already be prepared for another invasion?

Not so much, if there was a second wave closely follwing the first, the earf would be easier to take down


What a novel idea on a day like today.
2012-09-11 10:41:49 AM
1 votes:
A plot in the sequel? Why start now?
 
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