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(CBS New York)   Family sues electrical substation near their home because high-voltage shocks aren't pleasant   (newyork.cbslocal.com) divider line 22
    More: Scary, Westchester County, visual field test, NYSEG, ridges, rubber gloves, couples  
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1670 clicks; posted to Business » on 11 Sep 2012 at 9:43 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-11 06:06:39 AM


The couple described the shocks as sudden, sharp and jarring, especially around water. The couple also claims they had to euthanize their dog because the voltage made her chew the skin off her legs.


If this is true, they should be beaten with tiny hammers in sensitive places.

You let your dog flay her own legs off before you moved your selfish farks? fark YOU.

I hope they lose.
 
2012-09-11 08:50:08 AM
Does Mrs. Mendelson light up like a pinball machine and pay off in silver dollars?
 
2012-09-11 09:58:35 AM
Case to be heard in Circuit Court?
 
2012-09-11 10:13:30 AM

Mr. Potatoass: Case to be heard in Circuit Court?


WINNAR!
 
2012-09-11 10:22:30 AM

Mr. Potatoass: Case to be heard in Circuit Court?


Nice
 
2012-09-11 10:23:54 AM
The utility installed "voltage blockers?"

More like "the utility looked around, found nothing, and told the hypochondriac loonies that they had fixed the problem at great expense so they'd shut up."

Note that the reporter didn't say "we tried the same thing and got shocked too," and nobody stuck a voltmeter on anything. You don't get shocked because you're "around water" unless there's something to conduct electricity to you in the first place.

The dog went crazy because it had to live with the crazy lady.
 
2012-09-11 10:24:41 AM

doglover: The couple described the shocks as sudden, sharp and jarring, especially around water. The couple also claims they had to euthanize their dog because the voltage made her chew the skin off her legs.

If this is true, they should be beaten with tiny hammers in sensitive places.

You let your dog flay her own legs off before you moved your selfish farks? fark YOU.

I hope they lose.


So what you're saying is they should be ...
*that thing with the sunglasses*
...charged with animal cruelty?
 
2012-09-11 10:29:09 AM
I'm really confused. They're claiming electricity is leaking out of the substation and into what, the ground? And then into their house? And if their house is 270 years old it's either stone or wood which don't conduct terribly well. It sounds more like a wiring problem in their home.

Am I missing something, or are these like those idiots who claim high voltage lines gave them cancer?

/Also fark them for putting their dog to sleep rather than move the dog
 
2012-09-11 10:32:21 AM
I had some stray voltage show up at a property I own (no, really!) - I first noticed it when after a bad snowstorm and freeze, the chain across the entrance gate was free of snow, and felt hot to the touch. I measured less than 2 volts of potential across the gap, but silly me, I tried to measure the current flow, and it blew a fuse in the meter. The electric company fixed the issue.
 
2012-09-11 11:24:15 AM
I used to design substations and this is a thing - the family has a case if they can get the right experts with the right studies on their side in court.

/ABB > Siemens
 
2012-09-11 11:26:55 AM
The power company should sue them for all of that electricity they're getting to use for free. Maybe we can get a congressman to apologize to the power company for these leeches sucking up all of their stray voltage.
 
2012-09-11 11:35:10 AM

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: I used to design substations and this is a thing - the family has a case if they can get the right experts with the right studies on their side in court.

/ABB > Siemens


So would this be induction then? Magnetic fields from the substations inducing currents in metallic objects?
 
2012-09-11 11:36:30 AM
My company has been on several (construction) projects near high-voltage lines and substations and discovered this firsthand. Whenever we'd reach for a metal surface like a pipe or a downspout, there would be a visible spark. It certainly got annoying. One client lit up his backyard with small neon tubes hanging from the fence just to show the effect of the induced field.
 
2012-09-11 12:27:06 PM
Wireless energy and they have to be all ungrateful about it.
 
2012-09-11 03:10:39 PM
One client lit up his backyard with small neon tubes hanging from the fence just to show the effect of the induced field.

After which the utility sued him/her for electricity theft?
 
2012-09-11 03:46:11 PM

Gough: My company has been on several (construction) projects near high-voltage lines and substations and discovered this firsthand. Whenever we'd reach for a metal surface like a pipe or a downspout, there would be a visible spark. It certainly got annoying. One client lit up his backyard with small neon tubes hanging from the fence just to show the effect of the induced field.


That would be awesome to see first hand.
 
2012-09-11 04:20:31 PM
Yes, this is a real thing. AC lines are usually multiple phases, with an equal amount of power on each phase. Any difference between phases is equalized through the ground, which is a ~3 foot copper spike actually nailed into the ground next to power poles with transformers. What is happening is that power is running through the ACTUAL GROUND. If the phases are balanced, it is minimal and not noticable. If there is a large imbalance, the power can get quite high. The ground is a fairly good conductor of high voltage AC, and doing this allows the power company to run 1 less wire and save a bunch of money.

It is fairly well known that animals are more sensitive to ground currents. Barns usually require extensive grounding, as cows will stop giving milk with small ground currents. Neat, huh?
 
2012-09-11 05:11:53 PM

Famous Thamas: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: I used to design substations and this is a thing - the family has a case if they can get the right experts with the right studies on their side in court.

/ABB > Siemens

So would this be induction then? Magnetic fields from the substations inducing currents in metallic objects?


Yuppers - I used to design/commission the control systems for SVC (Static Var Compensation) or the stabilization of reactive power. This is a very common problem and anytime there is issue with grounding (for whatever reason, even soil type) you can expose surrounding areas to inductive loads. The hair standing on you neck under HV lines are one of those easy to notice effects. That's why if these people hire a consultant and he has the right equipment (basically a very sensitive Fluke) he/she can record the results and it's lawsuit city. In fact I know a whole dept. at my old company ABB that does this. When you get a 350 millions USD contract you can afford to send out Johan and his meter.
 
2012-09-11 06:31:22 PM

Endive Wombat: Gough: One client lit up his backyard with small neon tubes hanging from the fence just to show the effect of the induced field.

That would be awesome to see first hand.


Hanging neon tubes, you say?

It makes me sad that they haven't been replacing the neon tubes in Alewife station (Cambridge, MA) as they gradually die.

At present:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Alewife_tracks.jpg (pops)

When they were new:

http://www2.cambridgema.gov/cac/public_art_tour/map_01_alwife.html (pops; scroll down)
 
2012-09-11 10:24:06 PM
Several holes of my local golf course run under high-voltage lines .

When you stand under the closest lines, if you rest a graphite-shafted club on the ground with the clubhead (titanium head) touching the ground and the shaft in a vertical position, if you touch the shaft it feels as if you're receiving a continual weak charge, and it seems you can feel the shaft vibrating at a high frequency .
 
2012-09-12 02:40:24 AM

berniex: if you rest a graphite-shafted club on the ground with the clubhead (titanium head) touching the ground and the shaft in a vertical position, if you touch the shaft it feels as if you're receiving a continual weak charge, and it seems you can feel the shaft vibrating at a high frequency .


Wait a minute... are we still talking about power lines here... or did we just stumble into a "Dear Penthouse" letter?
 
2012-09-13 07:47:46 PM
I never thought this would happen to me...
 
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