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(Network World)   What online news looked liked on 9/11. Americans had to band together without Facebook or Twitter   (networkworld.com) divider line 256
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18715 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Sep 2012 at 6:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-10 12:04:50 PM

Master Batorium: Skirl Hutsenreiter: Of course, that was back before everyone had portable pocket computers. Whenever I remember how hard it was to get in touch with someone or find something out before smartphones, I feel like I'm living in a science fiction future.

You were stupid back then and you are stupid now.


and who dumped in your cheerios?
 
2012-09-10 12:05:21 PM

invictus2: We watch portable porn wherever we go, and we have sandwiches in a can, and push-up pasta. We are in the Jetsons my friend


I'm a farking cyborg.

Before 9/11 I was a sasquatch.

shiat.

Before 9/11 I lived in a hole dug out in the back behind this giant screen with all these flashing lights.
 
2012-09-10 12:06:54 PM
What a typical news website looked like on 9/11:

mvolo.com
 
2012-09-10 12:11:09 PM

OriginalGamer: What a typical news website looked like on 9/11:

[mvolo.com image 475x195]


Wow. That error message takes me back...
I haven't seen a machine using IE 6 (or was it IE 5?) in a long time.
 
2012-09-10 12:11:43 PM
Was in doing search and rescue from 9/13 on for ten days - didn't need the news. Mostly remember how much I hated having to keep in touch via AOL and the bills that incur when you have the only working cell phone when working with a whole squad of National Guard who really want to contact their loved ones. Surprisingly Sprint (of back in the day) waved the insanely large bill after I was out.
 
2012-09-10 12:21:00 PM

gobstopping:

Thanks Uncle Woodie!!!! You gave us Hitler (ya idiot bastid!)


Look how dumb you are....
 
2012-09-10 12:28:50 PM

gretzkyscores: myrrh: oldfarthenry: Nothing like hearing three engineers say `The buildings will hold up' then watching in horror as the towers fell.

Interesting, that. Lots of engineers thought the impacts were insufficient to bring the towers down.

Why is that "interesting"? They were correct - the impacts were insufficient. The heat from the burning jet fuel, OTOH...


I include the effects of jet fuel in the word "impacts." And if you can't figure out why that 's interesting, move along.
 
2012-09-10 12:37:47 PM

RedVentrue: ...and being angry about all the price gouging that day.


I remember they cancelled classes at the U of Michigan, but didn't really have a good way of telling folks yet. So thousands of students showed up to empty classes, then wandered over to the union / cafeterias / etc to check out the TVs because people still hadn't yet heard, or were in total denial that it could happen. I met up with a few friends and we decided to fill up on gas early before the prices went up so that we could try to ride out the next week of gouging. Then we went grocery shopping to get a few necessities before people panicked and emptied the shelves.
 
2012-09-10 12:43:44 PM
I was in college and my girlfriend at the time told me what happened. I told her it wouldn't be that big of a deal the U.S would find a country and bomb the shiat out of it and in a few years it would all be forgotten.


Well I was kind of right...
 
2012-09-10 12:48:39 PM
planes attacked the WTC?
for some reason i always thought i was hulk hogan
 
2012-09-10 12:48:40 PM

hoho19: We are working on turning it into a positive experience. Approximately 1% of all births are stillborn which is one stillborn birth every 20 minutes. In most cases, 40%, the cause of the stillbirth is unknown. For us we had a checkup the week before and were given a thumbs up, but maybe a day or two after that checkup was when the baby declined. We did not know until a week and a half later. There also is a lot of shame and guilt regarding still born children. A lot of women believe that it was their fault, they ate the wrong thing, they did the wrong thing, I sometimes blame myself for not having my wife go to the hospital the minute the contractions started, but sadly it wasn't my fault or hers. The baby probably died several days before that and it was the body's natural response to push the baby out. My wife and I would like to eventually speak to groups about our experiences and how shame and guilt shaped our lives afterwards. The measure of a strong person is the how they deal with a situation that can destroy them. We want to turn our tragedies into weapons to help others combat grief and shame so that they can also find strength and hope in the darkness of a situation like that.


been there, too. 11/8/1998. My wife never was the same. We adopted our son on 3/26/2002. Never looked back. good luck to you.
 
2012-09-10 12:57:47 PM

JimmyFartpants: I miss



So much this.  I can't stand the content of drudgereport.com, but I love the layout.  Even if he wrote is own articles... just links and a few pictures.  I know Fark has evolved a bit beyond that, but its essentially the same thing.  Links, text/images in the comments.
 
I'm not a luddite, I appreciate a lot of new technology- especially stuff going on with smart phones.  But damn, CNN, Fox, MSNBC are just un-usable nowadays.
 
2012-09-10 01:02:57 PM
I remember living near Chicago and for a few minutes being really afraid of what may be above me in the sky.
 
I'd actually think that if something like this happened nowadays, it would be much worse, with everyone able to post whatever they want, all over the place.  The signal to noise ratio would be horrible.
 
At least Fark, on that day, seemed to be relatively calm and most people were caveating rumors as "this is just a rumor I heard on the radio."
 
2012-09-10 01:06:31 PM
It was unique. It was a singularity that proved we never thought we could be attacked like that, but we were. I was shocked and dismayed and even offended that they hit us like that, but I was not surprised.
 
2012-09-10 01:13:03 PM
I was living on 14th Street at the time and all of my friends lived downtown. Thank god for the internet. We used AOL Chat to get in touch with everyone and make sleeping arrangements for our friends downtown who were displaced. We even found my then boyfriend's (now husband) mom via the internet. She worked in WTC, but her train was late. She got out of the subway, looked up, saw the plane flying in, and went straight to an "internet cafe" (remember those?) to email her boss and family to say she wouldn't be coming into work that day.

The phone lines (both cell and landline) were completely down (I'm assuming because of the buttload of calls). Thank god for the internet that day.

JuddyBuddy77: Okay, I didn't mean Jerks, people just seem to listen if you kinda insult them, maybe I'm wrong. And to comment on this thread, I had a roommate in college, when 9/11 happened. Never thought I would see him cry, but when you have everybody come by and knock on your door and say, "Don't go anywhere, you're a suspect!"....Only because he's Muslim. Didn't matter that he came over when he was 2, or that he felt the same way as everyone else that day.


I was the same way to my Muslim (and middle eastern looking friends). Not that they were "suspects" but I was very concerned for their safety. Like 20 or so of us went over my friend's apartment on 11th Street that night I FORCED them to stay in the apartment and told them I'd go to the deli for them to get whatever they wanted but I wouldn't allow them out.

They were kinda pissed at me I think, but I was really concerned there would be riots or looting that night.
 
2012-09-10 01:23:28 PM
Wasn't there some documentary years later that implied several of the 19 terrorists indulged in fast food and escorts in the days/hours prior to 9/11?

Imagine being a hooker/escort and finding out your last john just brought down one of the towers. That has to be right up there with the security people who waved them through the checkpoints...

/Not Mohammed Atta, he hated the wimmins. As in "don't bury me within 10 feet of any".
//Was on my way to work that morning, listened to Stern for 2-3 hours. No Fark at work :-(
///Female co-worker began screaming that we need to invade Pakistan/Saudia Arabia/insert-Arab-nation-here and kill them all. One of our vendors in that day was Pakistani (awk. ward).
 
2012-09-10 01:26:11 PM
Guess I'll add mine. I was 17, had dropped out of high school instead of going my senior year. (good idea... NOT - got GED and went on to college anyways) Me and roomate were woke up by his older brother who heard it on the radio, and for some reason thought the Russians did it. Turned on the TV (didnt have cable, internet, or a job, should have been at school doing my senior year) and watched Peter Jennings for about 48 hours. Towers had already fell when I woke up. Just crazy and surreal day.
 
2012-09-10 01:31:55 PM
It would be interesting to look at archives if they had existed.

I remember my friend going on and on about how we had to bomb India into the stone age.
 
2012-09-10 01:34:55 PM
I got home late in the day and made my tribute page capturing the images of the day. it's still up http:\\www.johnnyaqua.com/wtc.html
 
2012-09-10 01:35:41 PM
I miss the Fark that was, that day.

/no trolls
//no unfunny people trying to be funny
///sigh
 
2012-09-10 01:41:08 PM

BMFPitt: It would be interesting to look at archives if they had existed.

I remember my friend going on and on about how we had to bomb India into the stone age.


That's extra funny because India has nukes
 
2012-09-10 01:51:04 PM
Funny, I remember that day like it was yesterday, I was a senior in high school and had a free period first thing in the morning so I slept in. My brother (also a Farker) who was a truck driver at the time was on his way to NYC he called home to tell my Dad about it. Dad woke me up and I sat downstairs with him and watched the second plane hit live.
 
2012-09-10 01:56:27 PM
My fav web designers saw this coming: Bud Uglly 
www.moogov.com 

/Click the airplane
 
2012-09-10 02:19:01 PM
Sigh. Even though I didn't have any friends or family perish in the attack, any time I watch video clips, read stories, or see pictures from that day, I weep like a child. I'm not sure why.
 
2012-09-10 02:32:25 PM
The destruction knocked out my phone and internet (west side of Manhattan), so I had nothing. It was so frustrating to try and reach people outside NYC to find out what was happening right in front of me. I remember walking the streets and pausing with groups of people around cars to listen to the radio. I even met a man in the street with a transistor radio, which I hadn't seen since I was a kid. Didn't even get to see a TV until late that night. The next day, the emails started pouring in, but I don't remember using any online news source at all.
 
2012-09-10 02:43:31 PM
my union was starting a strike that day.. by the end of the day. strike over. we settled.
 
2012-09-10 02:46:15 PM
Back then Yahoo was my IE start page. I woke up, walked by my desk, wiggled the mouse, and saw that exact screen cap. Will never forget it.
 
2012-09-10 02:46:30 PM

Laikabot: I just remember being really pissed that our work just made us act like nothing was wrong and keep working.


Probably not as much as the idiot bosses that had their people stay in the towers and surrounding plaza buildings working while PLANES were smashing into them and they were on FIRE.

Had I been one of those employees and was fortunate enough to be in an undamaged part of the buildings, especially the towers, when that crap was going on... the boss would have seen me finish my coffee, pack my lunchbox, and head for the elevator. Dock my pay for the day if you want. Anyone with two brain cells to rub together knows that you do NOT stay in a building that's on fire and work.

I always wondered about that sh*t... the people who may have been trapped above the damage, those I can understand - they had no choice.
Everyone else should have been GONE from both buildings and the plaza by 9:30 (first plane hits @ 8:46... that's 44 minutes to get out. Why did anyone continue working? Why did anyone tell anyone else to continue working? YOUR BUILDING IS ON FIRE, GO HOME.

[puzzled_dog.jpg]
 
2012-09-10 03:03:24 PM
I had a fark account but didn't think to look here. I spent that day watching TV coverage with my 6 month old son. The next day or so I sewed a flag because ere were none to be found anywhere. I still have it, packed away somewhere.
 
2012-09-10 04:11:23 PM

rewind2846: Laikabot: I just remember being really pissed that our work just made us act like nothing was wrong and keep working.

Probably not as much as the idiot bosses that had their people stay in the towers and surrounding plaza buildings working while PLANES were smashing into them and they were on FIRE.

Had I been one of those employees and was fortunate enough to be in an undamaged part of the buildings, especially the towers, when that crap was going on... the boss would have seen me finish my coffee, pack my lunchbox, and head for the elevator. Dock my pay for the day if you want. Anyone with two brain cells to rub together knows that you do NOT stay in a building that's on fire and work.

I always wondered about that sh*t... the people who may have been trapped above the damage, those I can understand - they had no choice.
Everyone else should have been GONE from both buildings and the plaza by 9:30 (first plane hits @ 8:46... that's 44 minutes to get out. Why did anyone continue working? Why did anyone tell anyone else to continue working? YOUR BUILDING IS ON FIRE, GO HOME.

[puzzled_dog.jpg]



Did that happen at either WTC building??
 
2012-09-10 04:38:13 PM
So fortunate social media wasn't around then.
 
2012-09-10 04:43:24 PM
What it looked like for me was a blank screen and a swirling hourglass. The sites were overloaded most of the day.
 
2012-09-10 05:37:43 PM

downstairs: rewind2846: Laikabot: I just remember being really pissed that our work just made us act like nothing was wrong and keep working.

Probably not as much as the idiot bosses that had their people stay in the towers and surrounding plaza buildings working while PLANES were smashing into them and they were on FIRE.

Had I been one of those employees and was fortunate enough to be in an undamaged part of the buildings, especially the towers, when that crap was going on... the boss would have seen me finish my coffee, pack my lunchbox, and head for the elevator. Dock my pay for the day if you want. Anyone with two brain cells to rub together knows that you do NOT stay in a building that's on fire and work.

I always wondered about that sh*t... the people who may have been trapped above the damage, those I can understand - they had no choice.
Everyone else should have been GONE from both buildings and the plaza by 9:30 (first plane hits @ 8:46... that's 44 minutes to get out. Why did anyone continue working? Why did anyone tell anyone else to continue working? YOUR BUILDING IS ON FIRE, GO HOME.

[puzzled_dog.jpg]


Did that happen at either WTC building??


Yep. My cousin was in the 2nd tower hit. When the first plane hit, she evacuated to the street and was told by security to go back to her desk (probably to keep the streets uncluttered for emergency workers) Told security to go Fark themselves. She worked there during the '93 bombing. Her office was on a floor above the impact site, so her stubbornness saved her life that day.
 
2012-09-10 05:46:59 PM

bearcats1983: I think 9/11 will be my generation's (senior in high school at the time) "I remember where I was that day" moment. It's been 11 years; however, it was such a huge event and turning point in American history, you can't expect people to just consider it a footnote.


We are the same age.

I was in my senior year of high school. I went to a Jesuit school and was actually on a week-long retreat in rural Wisconsin (Kairos, for any other Jesuit kidds out there). I was one of the leaders. We woke up early that morning for silent meditation. When the first plane hit, one of the faculty advisers came in and grabbed the 4 other student leaders and I and brought us into another room. When he told us what happened, I remember we all started speculating about how and why. Most of us wanted to believe it was an accident or something, though that seemed far-fetched. A few minutes later, the retreat center administrator barged in and said that another plane had struck the other tower and the Pentagon had been hit as well.

We decided that, obviously, we had to share the news with the 30 other kids there. It was the first time in over 30 years that a Kairos had to be interrupted like that. There wasn't any televisions in the center but the administrator had one at his home a few miles away so he drove and got it.

Meanwhile, we had to break the news. When we told the other kids nobody believed it. There was always a lot of secrecy surrounding the retreat and people would always come back from it with this huge bond so I think most of the kids thought it was like a drill or exercise in the retreat. We had to wheel the tv in just to convince them otherwise. We watched the tv for the rest of the day and the retreat was effectively ruined.

It was so weird to come back home after that week. America had changed but we were sort of left behind and didn't have the opportunity to grieve or experience the event in the same way as everyone else. I remember watching the news that night and it really hit me what had happened

Being on that retreat for 9/11 was farking weird as hell.

I never saw the towers in person. I moved to New York in 2002 for college and have lived here for the last 10 years but the only New York I know is the post-9/11 version. I can even see the new "Freedom Tower" from my apartment

I've always been interested in people's 9/11 stories and living in New York has given me the opportunity to hear a ton of interesting ones. It's weird to think that if I was a year younger I would have been in the city that day and experienced it firsthand because my 9/11 was so strange and removed

//csb
 
2012-09-10 05:57:53 PM
I was a senior too. Most of the day is a blur past when a friend told me a second plane had hit, and I knew the world had changed forever.
The two things that will always hit me are the look on my sophomore history teacher's face when we finally saw it on TV (she brought her class to my AP Gov't teacher's room, we didn't have TV's in every class) and my Economics teacher's futile attempt to conduct class as usual. Pissed me off at the time, but maintaining normalcy was probly just her coping mechanism.
 
2012-09-10 06:00:36 PM

WMittensRomney: gobstopping: I agree with you: Ahhhh yes, it's THAT time of year again ! time to rip that scab off that has been trying to heal for so long, but no one will give it a frikkin rest. Yes people died, planes crashed, wars were started, move on people, move on and get over it already.

Yes, but our whole New American Culture (tm), of being afraid of anything that appears foreign, eschewing every bit of Freedom our ancestors fought and died to secure us, having a hard-on for aggressive warfare/world police/grand chessboard/new great game, torture, extra-judicial killing and zero privacy is built on that one event. . .

You think they're going to let us move on from it? NOPE! Once we start to move on and heal from it, we might start questioning our completely insane response, and possibly start rolling back the Stasi-State.

The sad thing is that our own leaders are something of "unintended" (maybe) accomplices to the crime. The terrorists did the first part, and then our own government came in to make sure it terrorized us as much as possible, for as long as possible, and that our very way of life be ended forever to "keep us safe". The way to thwart a terrorist IS to forget what they've done. It's just like a serial killer who revels in the press after they're thrown in the slammer. You're giving them EXACTLY what they were hoping for.

Then again. .. BE AFRAID!!!! BAD GUYS UNDER EVERY ROCK!!

You do realize you're part of what you're critiquing, right?


He's trying not to be. You shouldn't be either.
 
2012-09-10 06:08:07 PM

ThatGuyOverThere: RedVentrue: ...and being angry about all the price gouging that day.

I remember they cancelled classes at the U of Michigan, but didn't really have a good way of telling folks yet. So thousands of students showed up to empty classes, then wandered over to the union / cafeterias / etc to check out the TVs because people still hadn't yet heard, or were in total denial that it could happen. I met up with a few friends and we decided to fill up on gas early before the prices went up so that we could try to ride out the next week of gouging. Then we went grocery shopping to get a few necessities before people panicked and emptied the shelves.


Where I lived, gas prices increased at a rate of about $.50 per hour, starting at about $1.08 that morning. By closing gas was in the neighborhood of $7.00 a gallon
 
FNG [TotalFark]
2012-09-10 06:38:11 PM
I was a lurker until that day as well, as so many have said.

I was asleep when the first attacks hit, as I didn't go to work until 10am. My Mom called and told me to turn on the TV. I watched as the second plane hit. I numbly got in the shower and got in my car to get to work.

I lived very close to DC and worked in the suburbs, and I had no idea the city had been effectively evacuated. What usually took 30 minutes took over 2 hours, and since I worked for a large media firm at the time, I was told to leave because they had no idea who the next target might be. There was almost no one there. They told me to leave and go be with my family.

My parents lived nearby, so I drove to their place, after stopping for gas and waiting in a gas line (since it taken over two hours to get to work). I hadn't seen a gas line since 1976.

Everyone was panicked. I learned later that my sister, who worked near the Pentagon, had heard the explosion and saw the smoke billowing into the sky.

I also learned later that a former boss and friend had to walk for 6 hours to get home from DC to his suburb residence.

An acquaintance who worked at the Pentagon was late to work that day. His entire office was wiped out at a routine morning status meeting. Everyone he worked with was killed. It was unreal the guilt he felt.

I feel for everyone affected by that day, and I remember the original thread very well. I remember bigpeeler's "remember this face" post so early in the thread.

I am sorry for everyone who lost someone they loved.

That doesn't excuse the reasoning we were fed to storm the middle east, but for the troops, the lost, and their loved ones. Never forget.
 
2012-09-10 06:42:57 PM

RedVentrue: ThatGuyOverThere: RedVentrue: ...and being angry about all the price gouging that day.

I remember they cancelled classes at the U of Michigan, but didn't really have a good way of telling folks yet. So thousands of students showed up to empty classes, then wandered over to the union / cafeterias / etc to check out the TVs because people still hadn't yet heard, or were in total denial that it could happen. I met up with a few friends and we decided to fill up on gas early before the prices went up so that we could try to ride out the next week of gouging. Then we went grocery shopping to get a few necessities before people panicked and emptied the shelves.

Where I lived, gas prices increased at a rate of about $.50 per hour, starting at about $1.08 that morning. By closing gas was in the neighborhood of $7.00 a gallon


Thats what i though had lead to the higher gas prices.
 
2012-09-10 07:00:23 PM
I was playing the shiat out of some Counter-Strike.

/Didn't stop playing
//NYC Native.
///That game is a helluva drug.
 
2012-09-10 07:31:10 PM
9/11 never happened
 
2012-09-10 07:46:34 PM

Jake Havechek: Too bad Clinton let him go when he was offered to be turned over to US custody

That's a motherfarking lie.

Meanwhile, he was found and killed on Obama's watch, while Bush just didn't give a shiat.


He died in 2001, so who they killed is anybody's guess.
Link
 
2012-09-10 08:40:07 PM

DeadMouseTails: Yep. My cousin was in the 2nd tower hit. When the first plane hit, she evacuated to the street and was told by security to go back to her desk (probably to keep the streets uncluttered for emergency workers) Told security to go Fark themselves. She worked there during the '93 bombing. Her office was on a floor above the impact site, so her stubbornness saved her life that day.


I remember well the yearly fire drills we used to have at my office in midtown NYC in the mid-90s. SOP for a fire in any high-rise building at that time, as explained to us by the fire department folks who came to monitor our drills, was that the only floors to be evacuated were the two floors above and below any floor on fire. It was indeed meant to keep to a minimum the number of people that might be milling around on the street / getting in the way of firefighters arriving on scene. It's still not a bad idea if your building is on fire for any reason other than a terrorist attack.

/The first I heard about the '93 WTC attack came when I stopped at a newsstand on the street outside my office. The vendor said, "I hope you're not planning on taking the PATH home tonight..."
 
2012-09-10 08:51:14 PM

Lydia_C: DeadMouseTails: Yep. My cousin was in the 2nd tower hit. When the first plane hit, she evacuated to the street and was told by security to go back to her desk (probably to keep the streets uncluttered for emergency workers) Told security to go Fark themselves. She worked there during the '93 bombing. Her office was on a floor above the impact site, so her stubbornness saved her life that day.

I remember well the yearly fire drills we used to have at my office in midtown NYC in the mid-90s. SOP for a fire in any high-rise building at that time, as explained to us by the fire department folks who came to monitor our drills, was that the only floors to be evacuated were the two floors above and below any floor on fire. It was indeed meant to keep to a minimum the number of people that might be milling around on the street / getting in the way of firefighters arriving on scene. It's still not a bad idea if your building is on fire for any reason other than a terrorist attack.

/The first I heard about the '93 WTC attack came when I stopped at a newsstand on the street outside my office. The vendor said, "I hope you're not planning on taking the PATH home tonight..."


And that would have, and still does, make sense. No one knew what was coming and the primary concern was to have the streets cleared for fire trucks and ambulances. Of course, looking back now, hindsight being what it is, we know that was absolutely the wrong call and doomed people to die in the second tower. And possibly the first if they were told the same thing (2 floor above / 2 floors below).
 
2012-09-10 08:52:31 PM
There was a thread on Slashdot that a guy driving to work by the Pentagon took photos and posted them well before the mainstream media topok notice.

I watched the recent documentary on cable and the sound of jumpers hitting the roof/ground was very disturbing.
 
2012-09-10 10:32:28 PM

hoho19: I was in the university center on my way to Chemistry II. I was walking past and a building exploded. I paused and watched for the remainder of the 4 minutes before class. I huffed it over to chemistry to see my teacher sobbing. She let us go and I spent the rest of the day watching on TV and the internet.

On 9/11/2006 my wife and I lost our first born son, Toby. That was very hard, because the day now has a much more sorrowful meaning to us.

12/7/2010 we lost our third born, Lucy. The two days America has been attacked are now days that my wife and I have lost children.

:(


I can totally sympathize with you... on that day I was up feeding my still newborn, less then a month old, baby girl that I lost to SIDS a month later... and since then I've lost my wife less then a year ago today.

I can imagine the pain that day would bring up for you, especially since everyone talks about it every year, its just a constant reminder of what you've lost.
 
2012-09-10 11:19:06 PM

Bullseyed: dahmers love zombie: I just wish we'd focused on the (nominally) correct target.

We did focus on the correct target. It became apparent that Osama was going to be a pursuit of years rather than weeks, so they pulled out the Clinton battle plan against Iraq. Iraq was the most ahead in terms of a nuke and they'd be willing to sell one to terrorists.

What we didn't know is the Muslims would band together to save the nuke tech. All of Iraq's supplies went across the boarder to Iran and their program jumped decades in a single year.

Invading Iraq strengthened Iran and probably Lebanon, but caused Libya to give up their nukes and later fall, caused Egypt to fall and is in the process of causing Syria to fall. If public support hadn't disappeared thanks to the communist media, North Korea would probably have fallen by now.


I didn't know Dick Cheney was on fark.



/nice choice of handle too, Dick.
 
2012-09-11 01:05:55 AM
One of my strongest memories was of a kid calling ed the sock, and crying, because she was scared.

It was weird watching a sock with a cigar in it's mouth try, in all seriousness, to tell a teenager, that "everything was going to be ok"
 
2012-09-11 01:51:07 AM
I remember getting a phone call, waking me up (I'm on the West Coast), from a friend telling me that the WTC had been hit by planes. I didn't recognize his voice. I turned on my TV and as the picture was coming up, one of the Towers was going down. I immediately hung up with my friend and began the long task of trying to get through to my mother in Manhattan. It was almost 3 hours before she was able to get a call out to me. I was never able to get a call in to her. And another 6 hours of infrequent phone calls from her while she got out of Manhattan. She didn't work in the Towers, but not knowing what else was planned that day, I didn't breathe until she called me and said she was home.
 
2012-09-11 04:56:55 AM

Zeno-25: Ed Grubermann: Can we please move on? It's been eleven years.

Never!

[i.imgur.com image 600x818]


Damn. I was hoping I'd be the Weeners that image this year when I put it in another 9/11 thread.
There's always 2013. I won't forget.


Oh, and the 9/11 coverage on Fark sold me on it. How did I learn of Fark? From Ultima Online, of course.
 
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