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(io9)   Hubble spots galaxy that shouldn't exist. Apple asks judge to take it off the market   (io9.com) divider line 43
    More: Cool, galaxies, Hubble, spiral galaxy, Hubble Telescope, dwarf galaxies, History of the Universe, W.M. Keck Observatory  
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11092 clicks; posted to Geek » on 10 Sep 2012 at 9:30 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-10 05:49:46 AM
The universe is ancient and enormously enormous. It is even the slightest bit possible for something to happen, it has happened.
 
2012-09-10 08:39:11 AM
I love this headline so much.jpg
 
2012-09-10 08:45:12 AM

Sgygus: The universe is ancient and enormously enormous. It is even the slightest bit possible for something to happen, it has happened.


The ontological argument for patent trolling on a cosmic scale?
 
2012-09-10 09:47:57 AM
FTFA said UCLA astrophysicist Alice Shapley

So... Dr. Shapley? What the hell is this a Bond movie?
 
2012-09-10 09:53:41 AM
It looks to me, and my GED in Astrophysonomonitrix, that it's a group of globular cluster galaxies that by chance happen to look similar to a spiral, though not entirely like a spiral.
 
2012-09-10 09:59:53 AM
This article reads like the four horsemen of the aderpolypse.

1. According to a new study conducted by researchers using NASA's Hubble Telescope, it dates back roughly 10.7-billion years - and that makes it the most ancient spiral galaxy we've ever discovered.

The same NASA that came up with that whole GISS global warming bs? Why not just make up the data like you do with your climatology derp?

2. Shapley is co-author of the paper describing the discovery, which is published in the latest issue of Nature.

Nature, eh? Did they run out of stories to run about room temperature fusion?

3. Simulations conducted by University of Arizona researcher Charlotte Christenson indicate that gravitation interactions between the two, which she says appear to be in the process of colliding, may have helped BX442 take shape.

Garbage in, garbage out.

4. In science, these are the finds that help us rework our understanding of nature, the discoveries that force us to step back from what we thought we knew, re-assess our preconceived notions, and bring forth a newer, more fully formed view of our Universe.

The notion that the universe blinked into existence from nothingness isn't right? You don't say!
 
2012-09-10 10:01:26 AM
LOL, great headline subby
 
2012-09-10 10:13:06 AM
Headline made me chuckle

More!
 
2012-09-10 10:18:38 AM

unlikely: Sgygus: The universe is ancient and enormously enormous. It is even the slightest bit possible for something to happen, it has happened.

The ontological argument for patent trolling on a cosmic scale?


There are those who believe that life here began out there, far across the universe, with tribes of humans who may have been the forefathers of the Egyptians, or the Toltecs, or the Mayans. They may have been the architects of the great pyramids, or the lost civilizations of Lemuria or Atlantis.

Some believe that there may yet be brothers of man who even now fight over design and utility patents in a court far, far away, amongst the stars.
 
2012-09-10 10:20:34 AM
Nice job, Subby!

/Galaxy S owner...need an upgrade before Samsung gets ban-inated.
 
2012-09-10 10:23:44 AM

Parthenogenetic: unlikely: Sgygus: The universe is ancient and enormously enormous. It is even the slightest bit possible for something to happen, it has happened.

The ontological argument for patent trolling on a cosmic scale?

There are those who believe that life here began out there, far across the universe, with tribes of humans who may have been the forefathers of the Egyptians, or the Toltecs, or the Mayans. They may have been the architects of the great pyramids, or the lost civilizations of Lemuria or Atlantis.

Some believe that there may yet be brothers of man who even now fight over design and utility patents in a court far, far away, amongst the stars.


I was going to shop Jobs into Baltar's chair but was distracted by this.
right-thoughts.us
 
2012-09-10 10:27:14 AM

naz-drala: FTFA said UCLA astrophysicist Alice Shapley

So... Dr. Shapley? What the hell is this a Bond movie?


Actually, the Shapley name is a major one in astronomy. (I'm guessing, of course, that Dr. Alice is related. I could be wrong.)
 
2012-09-10 10:56:52 AM
Hoy candidate subby. Good work.
 
2012-09-10 11:06:43 AM

SevenizGud: This article reads like the four horsemen of the aderpolypse.

1. According to a new study conducted by researchers using NASA's Hubble Telescope, it dates back roughly 10.7-billion years - and that makes it the most ancient spiral galaxy we've ever discovered.

The same NASA that came up with that whole GISS global warming bs? Why not just make up the data like you do with your climatology derp?

2. Shapley is co-author of the paper describing the discovery, which is published in the latest issue of Nature.

Nature, eh? Did they run out of stories to run about room temperature fusion?

3. Simulations conducted by University of Arizona researcher Charlotte Christenson indicate that gravitation interactions between the two, which she says appear to be in the process of colliding, may have helped BX442 take shape.

Garbage in, garbage out.

4. In science, these are the finds that help us rework our understanding of nature, the discoveries that force us to step back from what we thought we knew, re-assess our preconceived notions, and bring forth a newer, more fully formed view of our Universe.

The notion that the universe blinked into existence from nothingness isn't right? You don't say!


It had to have help.
 
2012-09-10 11:12:42 AM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: SevenizGud: This article reads like the four horsemen of the aderpolypse.

1. According to a new study conducted by researchers using NASA's Hubble Telescope, it dates back roughly 10.7-billion years - and that makes it the most ancient spiral galaxy we've ever discovered.

The same NASA that came up with that whole GISS global warming bs? Why not just make up the data like you do with your climatology derp?

2. Shapley is co-author of the paper describing the discovery, which is published in the latest issue of Nature.

Nature, eh? Did they run out of stories to run about room temperature fusion?

3. Simulations conducted by University of Arizona researcher Charlotte Christenson indicate that gravitation interactions between the two, which she says appear to be in the process of colliding, may have helped BX442 take shape.

Garbage in, garbage out.

4. In science, these are the finds that help us rework our understanding of nature, the discoveries that force us to step back from what we thought we knew, re-assess our preconceived notions, and bring forth a newer, more fully formed view of our Universe.

The notion that the universe blinked into existence from nothingness isn't right? You don't say!

It had to have help.


I don't understand why people believe time is linear. The Tibetans believe time to be cyclical, which for all intents and purposes seems to make the most sense to me. No beginning, no end. Restarts, change, evolution.
 
2012-09-10 11:29:25 AM

the money is in the banana stand: I don't understand why people believe time is linear. The Tibetans believe time to be cyclical, which for all intents and purposes seems to make the most sense to me. No beginning, no end. Restarts, change, evolution.


Oh, so if we measure the rate something moves, it goes a steady rate, then all of a sudden has an infinite rate, and then slowly accelerates, all without any outside force. Yeah, that makes the most sense.

After all, that's what they believe in Tibet. I wonder what they believe in Somalia, maybe they believe time is like a parabola, and that will make even more sense. Or what do they believe in Burkina Faso? Maybe they believe it is cosecantal. That makes ALL the sense.
 
2012-09-10 11:39:33 AM

Parthenogenetic: unlikely: Sgygus: The universe is ancient and enormously enormous. It is even the slightest bit possible for something to happen, it has happened.

The ontological argument for patent trolling on a cosmic scale?

There are those who believe that life here began out there, far across the universe, with tribes of humans who may have been the forefathers of the Egyptians, or the Toltecs, or the Mayans. They may have been the architects of the great pyramids, or the lost civilizations of Lemuria or Atlantis.

Some believe that there may yet be brothers of man who even now fight over design and utility patents in a court far, far away, amongst the stars.


Fleeing from the Apple Tyranny, the last unscathed manufacturer, HTC leads a ragtag fugitive product line on a lonely quest for a shining patent known as LTE.
 
2012-09-10 11:41:58 AM

naz-drala: FTFA said UCLA astrophysicist Alice Shapley

So... Dr. Shapley? What the hell is this a Bond movie?


It is pronounced "Shap-lee", but before I heard it said out loud I thought it was "Shapely" too, and could
only picture this:

www.007.info

When in fact Dr. Shapley looked like this:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-09-10 12:11:54 PM
"but the discovery of BX442 - which is what they've dubbed the newfound galaxy - came as a huge surprise."

so they already know its inhabit by a bunch of inbred rednecks who cant talk?
 
2012-09-10 12:13:15 PM
July 19th, 2012.

Did the light from this submission take a long time to reach the modmins?
 
2012-09-10 01:25:19 PM
Didn't some really smart guy on that documentary "First person by Errol Morris" calculate that the universe should be something like 26 trillion years old?

Meh, seems reasonable
 
2012-09-10 01:31:33 PM
All great scientific discoveries begin with the words, "Huh...that's wierd."
 
2012-09-10 01:42:22 PM
groan, +1
 
2012-09-10 03:05:59 PM
"According to a new study conducted by researchers using NASA's Hubble Telescope, it dates back roughly 10.7-billion years - and that makes it the most ancient spiral galaxy we've ever discovered."

Our own Milky Way is a spiral galaxy, dated at about 13 billion years-old. So, what am I missing?
 
2012-09-10 03:20:47 PM

authorizeduser: "According to a new study conducted by researchers using NASA's Hubble Telescope, it dates back roughly 10.7-billion years - and that makes it the most ancient spiral galaxy we've ever discovered."

Our own Milky Way is a spiral galaxy, dated at about 13 billion years-old. So, what am I missing?


Our galaxy hasn't been a spiral for all that time.
 
2012-09-10 03:44:32 PM
M51 & NGC 5195 are not impressed.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-09-10 03:49:49 PM

SevenizGud: 2. Shapley is co-author of the paper describing the discovery, which is published in the latest issue of Nature.

Nature, eh? Did they run out of stories to run about room temperature fusion?


Well tabletop fusion is real. Link. It's not going to power your house anytime soon, but it makes for a nice compact neutron emitter.

Cold fusion... that's another kettle of fish...
 
2012-09-10 03:51:36 PM

unlikely: Parthenogenetic:
Fleeing from the Apple Tyranny, the last unscathed manufacturer, HTC leads a ragtag fugitive product line on a lonely quest for a shining patent known as LTE.


Man, my iPhone just started doing this red light back and forth thing.

Dick
 
2012-09-10 04:07:00 PM

Slaxl: my GED in Astrophysonomonitrix,


Oh, did you get that GED from the Midvale School for the Gifted Astrophysonomonitrix program? Because I hear that's one of the best Astrophysonomonitrix programs in the state.
 
2012-09-10 04:58:07 PM
The real reason for the existence of this galaxy?

img259.imageshack.us

God listens to 45s.

img268.imageshack.us
 
2012-09-10 06:15:50 PM

Sgygus: The universe is ancient and enormously enormous. It is even the slightest bit possible for something to happen, it has happened.


What are the implications of this? In my opinion it means that anything and everything you can imagine is possible and I think that is what makes this so wonderous.
 
2012-09-10 08:44:35 PM

SevenizGud: the money is in the banana stand: I don't understand why people believe time is linear. The Tibetans believe time to be cyclical, which for all intents and purposes seems to make the most sense to me. No beginning, no end. Restarts, change, evolution.

Oh, so if we measure the rate something moves, it goes a steady rate, then all of a sudden has an infinite rate, and then slowly accelerates, all without any outside force. Yeah, that makes the most sense.

After all, that's what they believe in Tibet. I wonder what they believe in Somalia, maybe they believe time is like a parabola, and that will make even more sense. Or what do they believe in Burkina Faso? Maybe they believe it is cosecantal. That makes ALL the sense.


We are surrounded by nothing. Not vacuum, which is spacetime with no matter in it, I mean NOTHING. The nothing causes any things (like spacetime) to expand into it. After a while spacetime will get ripped apart, leaving only quantum foam. Quantum physics says that anything has a small chance of just popping into existance. Eventually that will be a naked singularity which would undergo rapid expansion etc etc etc

No beginning, no end. The eternal golden sunrise.
 
2012-09-10 09:48:05 PM
"The vast majority of old galaxies look like train wrecks," said UCLA astrophysicist Alice Shapley in a press release. "Our first thought was, why is this one so different, and so beautiful?"

Duh, because god needed an earth II.
 
2012-09-10 10:04:41 PM

man metaphysical: Sgygus: The universe is ancient and enormously enormous. It is even the slightest bit possible for something to happen, it has happened.

What are the implications of this? In my opinion it means that anything and everything you can imagine is possible and I think that is what makes this so wonderous.


yep..i farked your mom..get over cuse you also sucked me
 
Zel
2012-09-10 10:40:48 PM
You know damn well the scientist are going to publish their best photographs with the Nature article.

Let's look at those?

i.imgur.com

That's not quite as high resolution as i09 put on their banner. The big nice blue banner image is fake, the little gray one is real. These things are far away.
 
2012-09-11 12:25:59 AM

bob_ross: Didn't some really smart guy on that documentary "First person by Errol Morris" calculate that the universe should be something like 26 trillion years old?

Meh, seems reasonable


Morris had seventeen guests over two seasons on that show. I've reviewed the complete list, by expertise, and not a single one of them seems qualified to make any such assertion:

college professor; writer; activist; postal manager; murder victim (not sure I get this one -- not an astrophysicist, in any case); squid expert; museum director; biographer (possibly not qualified as such); a couple lawyers (one of whom is now in federal prison); crime scene cleaner; CIA disguise and forgery expert; internet entrepreneur; smart bar bouncer; high school student ("professional," somehow); forensic pathologist; pilot

Some of these are very smart people, and some are supremely competent in their particular areas of expertise. But none of them seem qualified to accurately calculate the age of the universe.
 
2012-09-11 12:26:19 AM
This really sucks. Why? Because i know enough to know I'll be dead before we learn the really cool sh*t. FULLY FUND NASA!
 
2012-09-11 12:31:52 AM

naz-drala: FTFA said UCLA astrophysicist Alice Shapley

So... Dr. Shapley? What the hell is this a Bond movie?


Could be worse, could be J.D. Shapely.

As I understand it, though, his interests were focused on a much smaller scale.
 
2012-09-11 12:40:20 AM

authorizeduser: "According to a new study conducted by researchers using NASA's Hubble Telescope, it dates back roughly 10.7-billion years - and that makes it the most ancient spiral galaxy we've ever discovered."

Our own Milky Way is a spiral galaxy, dated at about 13 billion years-old. So, what am I missing?


Our galaxy may be 13 billion years old, but this galaxy was like this 10.7 billion years *ago*.

That's the part that makes my head full of fark, so to speak - we look at something, we're seeing it as it was X time ago. We see the Sun, we're seeing it as it was eight minutes ago. We see galaxy BX442, we're seeing it as it was 10.7 billion years ago, so if our estimates of the age of the universe are correct, this is either one of the oldest galaxies extant for it to be this well developed, or we have the age of the universe wrong, or we have some other assumption challenged and therefore need to re-evaluate.

Or, conditions for development could simply have been ideal by random chance. That one isn't as fun, though.
 
2012-09-11 01:38:19 AM
You magnificent bastard, subby. +1 internets.
 
2012-09-11 04:05:38 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: bob_ross: Didn't some really smart guy on that documentary "First person by Errol Morris" calculate that the universe should be something like 26 trillion years old?

Meh, seems reasonable

Morris had seventeen guests over two seasons on that show. I've reviewed the complete list, by expertise, and not a single one of them seems qualified to make any such assertion:

college professor; writer; activist; postal manager; murder victim (not sure I get this one -- not an astrophysicist, in any case); squid expert; museum director; biographer (possibly not qualified as such); a couple lawyers (one of whom is now in federal prison); crime scene cleaner; CIA disguise and forgery expert; internet entrepreneur; smart bar bouncer; high school student ("professional," somehow); forensic pathologist; pilot

Some of these are very smart people, and some are supremely competent in their particular areas of expertise. But none of them seem qualified to accurately calculate the age of the universe.


So you didnt actually watch it?
 
2012-09-11 04:50:46 PM

bob_ross: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: bob_ross: Didn't some really smart guy on that documentary "First person by Errol Morris" calculate that the universe should be something like 26 trillion years old?

Meh, seems reasonable

Morris had seventeen guests over two seasons on that show. I've reviewed the complete list, by expertise, and not a single one of them seems qualified to make any such assertion:

college professor; writer; activist; postal manager; murder victim (not sure I get this one -- not an astrophysicist, in any case); squid expert; museum director; biographer (possibly not qualified as such); a couple lawyers (one of whom is now in federal prison); crime scene cleaner; CIA disguise and forgery expert; internet entrepreneur; smart bar bouncer; high school student ("professional," somehow); forensic pathologist; pilot

Some of these are very smart people, and some are supremely competent in their particular areas of expertise. But none of them seem qualified to accurately calculate the age of the universe.

So you didnt actually watch it?


Is that somehow relevant?
 
2012-09-11 05:10:29 PM
When making claims I'd say so
 
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