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(BBC)   Ancient Romans painted Carrera Marble statues to make them more real looking. Bonus: Researcher with really stupid haircut (video)   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 42
    More: Interesting, ancient Romans, British Museum  
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4142 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Sep 2012 at 2:46 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-08 02:27:19 PM  
I always wondered why movies portrayed ancient Rome as this completely white marble city. Temples as well as statues were painted, quite gaudily in fact.
 
2012-09-08 02:56:51 PM  
I bet your mom still cuts your hair with a bowl, subby
 
2012-09-08 03:01:11 PM  
i237.photobucket.com
Still my fave.
Aliens.
 
2012-09-08 03:04:54 PM  
Is it sad that I was staring at the full-head-of-hair guy to try and figure out what was up with his hair long before i noticed the patch on the Italian guy?

\if you don't know that you can't have more than a goatee with a shaved head, you fail fashion 101. Hell you fail fashion 001.
 
2012-09-08 03:08:59 PM  
Wait, where the fark did the hat come from?!??!?

i.imgur.com
 
2012-09-08 03:09:08 PM  
In a similar vein, medieval castles were always richly decorated, but are always depicted as being of bare, cold, stone, because none of those decorations survived and we mostly don't know what they looked like.

I often wonder what will be known about us in a thousand years, how much they will have wrong. I suspect that less data will survive that span of time than many would assume.
 
2012-09-08 03:30:52 PM  

miniflea: In a similar vein, medieval castles were always richly decorated, but are always depicted as being of bare, cold, stone, because none of those decorations survived and we mostly don't know what they looked like.

I often wonder what will be known about us in a thousand years, how much they will have wrong. I suspect that less data will survive that span of time than many would assume.


Given how people will picture 600ad to 1300ad very similarly, or 300bc to 300ad, togas n shiat, I reckon in a thousand years people will think we go on great steamships to the other side of the world, and concordes for the return leg. Giant skyscrapers overlooking King Louis XVI's execution and whatever someone invents in 100 years time at the battle of Waterloo.... and moon pie. Moon pie? What a time to be alive.
 
2012-09-08 03:48:37 PM  
Is this supposed to be something new? We've known that the ancients painted their statues for decades.
 
2012-09-08 03:50:58 PM  
What about roman graffitti?
 
2012-09-08 03:54:58 PM  

LesserEvil: Wait, where the fark did the hat come from?!??!?

[i.imgur.com image 639x357]


www.nndb.com
 
2012-09-08 03:57:05 PM  
Obligatory:

img525.imageshack.us
 
2012-09-08 04:07:20 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org

Looks pretty real to me.
 
2012-09-08 04:11:58 PM  

miniflea: In a similar vein, medieval castles were always richly decorated, but are always depicted as being of bare, cold, stone, because none of those decorations survived and we mostly don't know what they looked like.


"Were ancient people writing about events they witnessed? Who were these mysterious Skywalkers, and where were they going on their epic Star Trek? Was Babylon 5 a space outpost for the aliens that controlled ancient society?"
 
2012-09-08 04:24:39 PM  
Holy shiat ballz, that dude's hair is cracking my ass up!

Looks like a divot that I hacked up on the back nine last week!
 
2012-09-08 04:27:42 PM  
interesting updated information on this.

So it makes you think that the Romans would look at our statues and say.. "You are missing something..."
 
2012-09-08 04:28:03 PM  
The Greeks did the same thing. The Acropolis had painted stuff all over. The frieze of the Parthenon now sometimes referred to as the Elgin marbles, was painted in what most people would call cartoon colors. Not just bright but damn near gaudy. And the Romans like the Greeks put paint on anything, not just marble but other stone, wood, concrete etc.
 
2012-09-08 04:28:52 PM  

attention span of a retarded fruit fly: So it makes you think that the Romans would look at our statues and say.. "You are missing something..."


So would the Greeks. And both would wonder about all this bare marble we have all over the place and how we fawn over the beauty of bare marble.
 
2012-09-08 04:29:11 PM  
Second owners fark up your work.

That marble is awesome, can't imagine anyone that appreciates that fact to desire paint.

/They should paint the Empire State Building
 
2012-09-08 04:31:19 PM  

miniflea: In a similar vein, medieval castles were always richly decorated, but are always depicted as being of bare, cold, stone, because none of those decorations survived and we mostly don't know what they looked like.

I often wonder what will be known about us in a thousand years, how much they will have wrong. I suspect that less data will survive that span of time than many would assume.


The ability to maintain equipment at the lower level will be lost, always.
 
2012-09-08 04:53:31 PM  

miniflea: In a similar vein, medieval castles were always richly decorated, but are always depicted as being of bare, cold, stone, because none of those decorations survived and we mostly don't know what they looked like.

I often wonder what will be known about us in a thousand years, how much they will have wrong. I suspect that less data will survive that span of time than many would assume.


They will have good data from color photographs in books, so from about 1930 to roughly about now. I expect at least some books with color photos will survive over that time period.

Looking into the future, I'm less confident. Electronic data just doesn't survive as well as a printed hard copy.
 
2012-09-08 05:29:28 PM  

dittybopper: miniflea: In a similar vein, medieval castles were always richly decorated, but are always depicted as being of bare, cold, stone, because none of those decorations survived and we mostly don't know what they looked like.

I often wonder what will be known about us in a thousand years, how much they will have wrong. I suspect that less data will survive that span of time than many would assume.

They will have good data from color photographs in books, so from about 1930 to roughly about now. I expect at least some books with color photos will survive over that time period.

Looking into the future, I'm less confident. Electronic data just doesn't survive as well as a printed hard copy.


Was going to say the same thing. Barring new advances in storage technology and people willing to recopy lots of info stored on present day digital devices to that new medium, today's society won't be leaving much behind that folks a few centuries from now will be able to look at. There will certainly be lots of crumbling concrete, though.
 
2012-09-08 06:14:06 PM  
I've always heard that the statues were painted but I always wondered why the paint never survived. There are many examples of painted murals and frescoes, not to mention graffiti in roman buildings. Why did that paint survive but the paint on the statues didn't?
 
2012-09-08 06:23:13 PM  

Dinki: Is this supposed to be something new? We've known that the ancients painted their statues for decades.


Well, more than decades. We've pretty much always known this.

You can still see with the naked eye traces of the original pigment on some statues.
 
2012-09-08 06:26:14 PM  

Igor Jakovsky: Why did that paint survive but the paint on the statues didn't?


Being exposed to the elements, sometimes buried after that, it'll all scrub the paint off.
 
2012-09-08 06:43:25 PM  

WhyteRaven74: Igor Jakovsky: Why did that paint survive but the paint on the statues didn't?

Being exposed to the elements, sometimes buried after that, it'll all scrub the paint off.


I wonder what the ancient romans used for primer?
 
2012-09-08 06:47:47 PM  

Weaver95: WhyteRaven74: Igor Jakovsky: Why did that paint survive but the paint on the statues didn't?

Being exposed to the elements, sometimes buried after that, it'll all scrub the paint off.

I wonder what the ancient romans used for primer?


Glidden Agrippa.
 
2012-09-08 07:08:06 PM  

MrEricSir: Obligatory:

[img525.imageshack.us image 350x500]


OMFG dude...... What the hell was the name of that book? I wanted to recommend it to someone last week when they were musing on what future archaeologists might think about modern society, but I couldn't remember the book. THAT was exactly what I remembered though.
 
2012-09-08 07:10:23 PM  

Dinki: We've known that the ancients painted their statues for decades.


And then they had to repaint them. They had yet to discover paint that lasted longer than decades.
 
2012-09-08 07:10:32 PM  
DERRRRRRP....found it
 
2012-09-08 07:26:29 PM  

Igor Jakovsky: I've always heard that the statues were painted but I always wondered why the paint never survived. There are many examples of painted murals and frescoes, not to mention graffiti in roman buildings. Why did that paint survive but the paint on the statues didn't?


I guess because most building materials that you paint on are not highly polished and solid, so the paint sinks in and is absorbed, and there is more of it, where on marble it will peal away very easily if the statue is abraded or exposed to the elements?

croesius: I always wondered why movies portrayed ancient Rome as this completely white marble city. Temples as well as statues were painted, quite gaudily in fact.


Of course once movies in the past have assumed something, it becomes expected and often the movie makers would be ridiculed for showing the truth - wasn't there a fark link a week or so ago on this very topic - things like the statue of liberty head being made larger than reality in Cloverfield after audience complaints, and some criminals escape attempt was toned down compared to reality, Mars is shown as red, etc.
 
2012-09-08 08:20:06 PM  

cretinbob: OMFG dude...... What the hell was the name of that book? I wanted to recommend it to someone last week when they were musing on what future archaeologists might think about modern society, but I couldn't remember the book. THAT was exactly what I remembered though.


Motel of the Mysteries. Same artist/author who did the City/Cathedral/Mill/Unbuilding series.
 
2012-09-08 10:24:34 PM  

miniflea: In a similar vein, medieval castles were always richly decorated, but are always depicted as being of bare, cold, stone, because none of those decorations survived and we mostly don't know what they looked like.

I often wonder what will be known about us in a thousand years, how much they will have wrong. I suspect that less data will survive that span of time than many would assume.


With our luck it will only be things rule 34 related that survive and our generation will not be spoken of at all.
 
2012-09-08 11:18:27 PM  

scalpod: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x292]

Looks pretty real to me.


Yeah. That's because silicon is easier to work with than marble.
 
2012-09-09 01:44:25 AM  

Dwight_Yeast: cretinbob: OMFG dude...... What the hell was the name of that book? I wanted to recommend it to someone last week when they were musing on what future archaeologists might think about modern society, but I couldn't remember the book. THAT was exactly what I remembered though.

Motel of the Mysteries. Same artist/author who did the City/Cathedral/Mill/Unbuilding series.


David MacCauley. I have most of his books. All worth owning.
 
2012-09-09 02:26:46 AM  

Heron: dittybopper: miniflea: In a similar vein, medieval castles were always richly decorated, but are always depicted as being of bare, cold, stone, because none of those decorations survived and we mostly don't know what they looked like.

I often wonder what will be known about us in a thousand years, how much they will have wrong. I suspect that less data will survive that span of time than many would assume.

They will have good data from color photographs in books, so from about 1930 to roughly about now. I expect at least some books with color photos will survive over that time period.

Looking into the future, I'm less confident. Electronic data just doesn't survive as well as a printed hard copy.

Was going to say the same thing. Barring new advances in storage technology and people willing to recopy lots of info stored on present day digital devices to that new medium, today's society won't be leaving much behind that folks a few centuries from now will be able to look at. There will certainly be lots of crumbling concrete, though.


And with digital data, you'd better hope the software you used to create it is still around. I have a disc of old letters and scripts that I can't read at all because they were written with Windows Write, a word processing program that came with Win 3.0. It's unreadable gibberish per Notepad and MS Word won't open it at all. I still have several printed pages of stuff from that era, though. If it's important, print it out.
 
2012-09-09 09:06:34 AM  

WhyteRaven74: The Greeks did the same thing. The Acropolis had painted stuff all over. The frieze of the Parthenon now sometimes referred to as the Elgin marbles, was painted in what most people would call cartoon colors. Not just bright but damn near gaudy. And the Romans like the Greeks put paint on anything, not just marble but other stone, wood, concrete etc.


I learned this on fark some time ago. Poster had a nice link with what painted Greek marbles probably looked like. /stone cutter/
 
2012-09-09 12:14:47 PM  

LesserEvil: Wait, where the fark did the hat come from?!??!?

[i.imgur.com image 639x357]


A haberdasher?
 
2012-09-09 12:17:40 PM  
Anyone old enough to remember the "Saturday Night Live" spoof of 'The Beverly Hillbillies' called 'The Bel-Arabs?' The Jethro character was going around painting pubic hair on all the statues.
 
2012-09-09 07:50:46 PM  

WordyGrrl: Heron: dittybopper: miniflea: In a similar vein, medieval castles were always richly decorated, but are always depicted as being of bare, cold, stone, because none of those decorations survived and we mostly don't know what they looked like.

I often wonder what will be known about us in a thousand years, how much they will have wrong. I suspect that less data will survive that span of time than many would assume.

They will have good data from color photographs in books, so from about 1930 to roughly about now. I expect at least some books with color photos will survive over that time period.

Looking into the future, I'm less confident. Electronic data just doesn't survive as well as a printed hard copy.

Was going to say the same thing. Barring new advances in storage technology and people willing to recopy lots of info stored on present day digital devices to that new medium, today's society won't be leaving much behind that folks a few centuries from now will be able to look at. There will certainly be lots of crumbling concrete, though.

And with digital data, you'd better hope the software you used to create it is still around. I have a disc of old letters and scripts that I can't read at all because they were written with Windows Write, a word processing program that came with Win 3.0. It's unreadable gibberish per Notepad and MS Word won't open it at all. I still have several printed pages of stuff from that era, though. If it's important, print it out.


Maple can correctly import .wri files. So does:
- MacOS MS Word 2011
- Planamesa NeoOffice for Mac
- Win MS Word 2010
- MS Works
- MS Wordpad
- Corel WP Office X6
- Atlantis WP
- TextMaker
- AbilityWrite
- and of course MS Write, if you can find it

Here's an experimental converter you might try.

If you can't find one of the above programmes to use, just open it in WordPad or Notepad. You'll probably see a lot of junk characters at the top and bottom; these is formatting and other metadata you can't use and don't need. The original text should still be intact in between, though probably not in the original page layout. Just delete the junk, save the rest in whatever format you want it to be in now, and reformat at your leisure.

/RTF FTW
 
2012-09-10 05:12:36 AM  

miniflea: I often wonder what will be known about us in a thousand years, how much they will have wrong. I suspect that less data will survive that span of time than many would assume.


I think they'll know far more about us than we will about the Romans.

History didn't seriously start being regarded as an investigative science until the Enlightenment.

The problem with Roman historians (or any ancient historians) is that history to them wasn't considered an investigative science but rather a form of theatre or literature. The Romans weren't interested in the facts, they were interested in the best story, so their writers were encouraged to dress up their histories with as much sensationalism as possible that would make their accounts more evocative than other historians' accounts. It was the most popular accounts that usually passed into history as truth (which is why nearly every Roman writer was pro-Senate and often depicted the Imperial Family as a bunch of backstabbing, duplicitous spoiled powermongers, which they probably were, but not to the soap opera extent that every writer portrayed them as).

This is what we have to accept today: That every surviving record is very likely the Fox News equivalent of Roman history. In other words, partially based on truth, but probably not even close to being accurate.
 
2012-09-10 08:43:32 AM  

LesserEvil: Wait, where the fark did the hat come from?!??!?

[i.imgur.com image 639x357]


A hat store.
 
2012-09-10 12:55:27 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: WordyGrrl:I have a disc of old letters and scripts that I can't read at all because they were written with Windows Write, a word processing program that came with Win 3.0.

Maple can correctly import .wri files....Here's an experimental converter you might try.


Sylvia, you are a wonderful human being. Thank you! :-)
 
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