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(National Geographic)   Interactive: When Yellowstone Explodes   (ngm.nationalgeographic.com) divider line 35
    More: Scary, National Geographic, P.O. Box, Yellowstone  
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7347 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Sep 2012 at 1:38 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-08 12:41:44 AM  
EVERYBODY PANIC
 
2012-09-08 12:51:14 AM  
I don't know where I'm a gonna go when the volcano blow!
 
2012-09-08 12:53:27 AM  
2.1 1.3, 640k....

800k, 660,000k... Looks like we're good for a few millennia. That said, it could be any day now. I'm just glad I'll be in the first wave of death.

/EVERYBODY PICKINIC
 
2012-09-08 01:40:50 AM  
I'm plenty close enough that it won't matter.

I hope the rest of you suffer!!!
 
2012-09-08 01:54:00 AM  

Xaxor: EVERYBODY PANIC


www.hotflick.net
 
2012-09-08 01:59:13 AM  

mediablitz: I'm plenty close enough that it won't matter.

I hope the rest of you suffer!!!



CSB: My parents live a few miles from a nuke plant. The emergency plan that the county sends out to residents telling them what to do if the plant has an emergency contains a map with the plant surrounded by concentric circles based on how bad the radiation levels would be the farther away you are. My parents' house is located inside the dot in the middle, which I think means your radiation level is "vaporized."
 
2012-09-08 02:07:01 AM  

mediablitz: I'm plenty close enough that it won't matter.

I hope the rest of you suffer!!!


Yea but you'd get to see it :)
 
2012-09-08 02:25:40 AM  
Doesn't it do that every 90 minutes?
 
2012-09-08 02:33:00 AM  
pauljenkins.tv
 
2012-09-08 02:36:05 AM  
The earthquake swarm included sub-3.0 quakes, which were "unperceptable"?

/Showing results for imperceptible
 
2012-09-08 02:44:14 AM  

unyon: 2.1 1.3, 640k....

800k, 660,000k... Looks like we're good for a few millennia. That said, it could be any day now. I'm just glad I'll be in the first wave of death.

/EVERYBODY PICKINIC


The timing depends on so much. How far has the hot spot moved laterally in relation to the north american plate. How solid is the ground above the magma chamber in relation to the pressure. How fast is heat/magma coming up the column. If the ground continues to swell at the current rate, an eruption isn't a long time off. At least in geologic terms.
 
2012-09-08 03:07:41 AM  
 
2012-09-08 03:09:12 AM  
Wait, this is in 2009. Wasn't it reported earlier this year that the swelling was going back down?
 
2012-09-08 03:21:36 AM  

LoneWolf343: Wait, this is in 2009. Wasn't it reported earlier this year that the swelling was going back down?


Whew! We were all worried there for a bit about Submitter's mom
 
2012-09-08 03:24:06 AM  
*checks map* When reports start coming in that make eruption very very likely, I'll make friends with the local doomsday preppers. Until then, it wouldn't hurt to get to know a few.
 
2012-09-08 05:09:41 AM  
Science, doing nothing but scaring people since curing polio!
 
2012-09-08 05:11:07 AM  
Last time I was in Yellowstone, I was hiking a path and saw some steam hissing from a fissure that had opened up in the middle of it. I reported it and went back a couple of days later and they'd moved the path a dozen or so yards to the side. The trees near it had started to have their pine needles turn brown. Fascinating place, but I bet there'll be plenty of warning before it does go off.
 
2012-09-08 05:16:57 AM  
Still better than living in Massachusetts
 
2012-09-08 05:25:34 AM  

r1niceboy: Last time I was in Yellowstone, I was hiking a path and saw some steam hissing from a fissure that had opened up in the middle of it. I reported it and went back a couple of days later and they'd moved the path a dozen or so yards to the side. The trees near it had started to have their pine needles turn brown. Fascinating place, but I bet there'll be plenty of warning before it does go off.


I doubt it, the warning signs are hard to notice, things like fissures opening up randomly hissing out steam often go unnoticed, but it's just as well because once steam hissing fissures start opening up the countdown to extinction has already begun.
 
2012-09-08 05:31:35 AM  
I'm moving to Madagascar before it happens. Those farkers can survive anything.
 
2012-09-08 06:57:43 AM  
I for one do not see enough Pic-a-nic Baskets to take this seriously Boo-Boo
 
2012-09-08 09:50:13 AM  

shower_in_my_socks: mediablitz: I'm plenty close enough that it won't matter.

I hope the rest of you suffer!!!


CSB: My parents live a few miles from a nuke plant. The emergency plan that the county sends out to residents telling them what to do if the plant has an emergency contains a map with the plant surrounded by concentric circles based on how bad the radiation levels would be the farther away you are. My parents' house is located inside the dot in the middle, which I think means your radiation level is "vaporized."


I used to live in that zone. Diablo Canyon?
 
2012-09-08 10:43:23 AM  
DRTA

They should probably stop fracking in the area.
 
2012-09-08 11:36:56 AM  

Bontesla: DRTA

They should probably stop fracking in the area.


So much THIS.
 
2012-09-08 11:50:28 AM  

The_Sponge: I don't know where I'm a gonna go when the volcano blow!


I'm ashamed to say that I see what you did there.
 
2012-09-08 09:59:11 PM  

shower_in_my_socks: mediablitz: I'm plenty close enough that it won't matter.

I hope the rest of you suffer!!!


CSB: My parents live a few miles from a nuke plant. The emergency plan that the county sends out to residents telling them what to do if the plant has an emergency contains a map with the plant surrounded by concentric circles based on how bad the radiation levels would be the farther away you are. My parents' house is located inside the dot in the middle, which I think means your radiation level is "vaporized."


Ah, the old saw about nuke plant = nuke bomb. How quaint.
 
2012-09-08 10:11:35 PM  

tinfoil-hat maggie: mediablitz: I'm plenty close enough that it won't matter.

I hope the rest of you suffer!!!

Yea but you'd get to see it :)


"Hey baby. We have about 20 minutes left...."

Best...sex...ever...
 
2012-09-08 11:34:36 PM  

Moonstone: Bontesla: DRTA

They should probably stop fracking in the area.

So much THIS.


Forgive me for suggesting, first of all, that two accounts created less than a month from each other (at about the same time of day, no less) in the same place, and completely agreeing with other just *might* be two persons who know each other IRL. Or even the same person. (The fact that one has zero greenlights only adds to the supicion: I doubt most people submit anything under their alts.) Not that that's relevant to anything. Just pointing it out.

Second, to my knowledge, there is no fracking in or anywhere near Yellowstone, nor are there any plans to. Fracking must be done where it's likely to yield results, and most places aren't likely candidates. Two maps I looked at, one showing current fracking locations and one showing prospective future fracking locations, both did not show anything in this area. When I see him tomorrow, I'll ask my geologist father (who's also worked in the petroleum industry) if he has anything to add, but I expect he'll tell me the same.

As for how and whether fracking causes seismic activity, I believe the science is still out on that, but I'll still ask. My assumption would be that if fracking does cause seismic activity, it likely triggers small quakes that may actually help release pressure on fault zones, and possibly actually prevent bigger ones down the road. I say this because I do at least understand that earthquakes happen to release fault stress, and fault stress is a tectonic force far beyond our ability to control. Meaning, we can't *prevent* earthquakes, and any we 'cause' are, in some way, part of the total energy that must be released at some point no matter what. That is, we can't trigger quakes where none would occur otherwise, because humans don't command those magnitudes of forces.* But I feel sure we can weaken stressed faults and release some of the energy in them, and in that sense 'cause' earthquakes. By this I don't mean suggest that fracking is okay, or that we shouldn't be concerned about its possible seismic effects, only that I feel it's worthwhile to consider it on context of the overall tectonic reality. Again, though, let me ask my father about all this and see what he has to say.

(* Because someone will inevitably point out that, for example, Tsar Bomba was equivalent in force to a Richter-7 quake -- mag-8.35, if you really want to be dramatic about it -- I feel it necessary to clarify that what I mean is that we have no control over tectonics.)
 
2012-09-09 11:13:08 AM  
Yellowstone doesn't really have any typical faults though. It's a hotspot.

As there is no plate/fault pressure, fracking would do little to reduce pressure. Rather the pressure that matters around Yellowstone would be the pressure of the magma chamber and the amount of pressure the surrounding crust can contain. Now, if you're suggesting that relieving pressure could transform a hotspot born supervolcano into a more innocuous volcano, I wouldn't necessarily say no, because I don't think that kind of knowledge exists outside of theory, but I would argue that we're long past the point where we could safely relieve pressure from Yellowstone.
 
2012-09-09 11:33:39 AM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Forgive me for suggesting, first of all, that two accounts created less than a month from each other (at about the same time of day, no less) in the same place, and completely agreeing with other just *might* be two persons who know each other IRL. Or even the same person. (The fact that one has zero greenlights only adds to the supicion: I doubt most people submit anything under their alts.)


Aha, righteous bust! Well played. Although some of us have been on Fark forever and have zero greenlights, or for that matter zero submitted links. I prefer to mooch entertainment and knowledge off the hard-working John Galts of Fark while giving nothing back. Dance, monkeys, dance!

Besides, what he's saying is stupid. Fracking has enough long-term cost-efficiency problems before you even get to the policy issues, enough policy issues before you even look at the environmental consequences, and too many environmental consequences to even bother talking about the short-term PR costs. I seriously doubt there's a single goddamn thing we can do to affect this kind of geological event*, but if we could bring about the apocalypse with fracking, there would probably be some university geologist saying so. 

* Yes, many geologists do believe that fracking may very well be causing small earthquakes and other geological events, some of them even potentially dangerous. But even a big earthquake is many orders of magnitude away from the kinds of forces that are currently keeping this thing safely underground.
 
2012-09-09 12:39:59 PM  

semiotix: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Forgive me for suggesting, first of all, that two accounts created less than a month from each other (at about the same time of day, no less) in the same place, and completely agreeing with other just *might* be two persons who know each other IRL. Or even the same person. (The fact that one has zero greenlights only adds to the supicion: I doubt most people submit anything under their alts.)

Aha, righteous bust! Well played. Although some of us have been on Fark forever and have zero greenlights, or for that matter zero submitted links. I prefer to mooch entertainment and knowledge off the hard-working John Galts of Fark while giving nothing back. Dance, monkeys, dance!

Besides, what he's saying is stupid. Fracking has enough long-term cost-efficiency problems before you even get to the policy issues, enough policy issues before you even look at the environmental consequences, and too many environmental consequences to even bother talking about the short-term PR costs. I seriously doubt there's a single goddamn thing we can do to affect this kind of geological event*, but if we could bring about the apocalypse with fracking, there would probably be some university geologist saying so. 

* Yes, many geologists do believe that fracking may very well be causing small earthquakes and other geological events, some of them even potentially dangerous. But even a big earthquake is many orders of magnitude away from the kinds of forces that are currently keeping this thing safely underground.


A lot of people think I just out and out hate zero-lighters on principle, because I used to denigate people by pointing that out, and I think people misunderstood. I actually have some zero-lighters favorited. The people I call 'zeroes' are indeed zero-lighters, but that's just the nail in a coffin that's already occupied. If someone says something stupid or useless, and I see that they also have no greenlights, l assume they're just lazy and worthless, and aren't likely to ever be worth my time. Not *all* zero-lighters, certainly, but definitely an awful lot, offer other evidence on top of that that they're not likely to ever contribute in any way I'll appreciate, just be annoying. Into the bin they go. The ones who annoy me the most are those who complain about what other people submitted or what headline they wrote. It's not that hard to get *one* damn greenlight, so I feel strongly that anyone who complains about other people's submissions without any evidence of their own doesn't deserve any respect for it. And since I also feel that such people are likely to be irritating in other ways, I'll happily dispose of them right away.

The John Galt line cracked me up, by the way.

I still haven't talked to my father about this today, so thanks for reminding me. I did forget. I'm not a morning person. We normally get together for lunch on Sundays, but he's off at some wine and food thing, and I'm still washing mud off my clothes from yesterday's storms. I'll try to catch him tonight, if I can. I know he's been reading a lot about this lately, so I feel sure he'll have something to offer.
 
2012-09-09 02:49:56 PM  
The All-Powerful Atheismo: I'm moving to Madagascar before it happens. Those farkers can survive anything.

Better hurry up before a guy in Brazil sneezes and they SHUT DOWN EVERYTHING
 
2012-09-09 04:08:20 PM  

TheManInBlack: Hot Pockets!


I'm so glad I wasn't the only person who thought of this when I saw that Caliente pocket under the caldera/plume...

/comedy radio stations on my tune-in radio app get me through the day..
 
2012-09-09 06:12:53 PM  
So, can't we mine this for geothermal energy?
 
2012-09-09 09:25:32 PM  
Okay, I finally caugt up with my geologist father today, and here's what he says.

Environmental impact: It runs the gamut, and seems to correlate to practices. Case surveys find a strong correlation between little or no notable environmental impact and following best industry practices. Operators following the law but not best practices tended to experience moderate to notable impact. Operators found in violation of legal requirements tended to experience notable to serious environmental impacts resulting, more or less commensurate with now much they violated. Tentative conclusion: Following best industry practices, above and beyond the requirements of law, can deliver minimal and acceptable environmental impact. (Unstated but occurring to me: Stricter regulation, more consistent with best industry practices as proven effective, should deliver acceptable impact for compliant operators.)

Seismic causality: There is inconclusive but compelling evidence suggesting that fracking may trigger small earthquakes in or near susceptible fault zones where fracking is done. However, as I said above, ALL earthquakes are fundamentally the result of existing and ongoing tectonic stresses. Human activities cannot cause or halt tectonic activity, as no human technology approaches the delivery of energy that can possibly do so. (My father likened it to a flea doing a tap dance on an elephant's back.) Human activity *may* prematurely relieve some fault stress, but it's important to note that it does not *cause* the stresses that create earthquakes, and can't. In other words, fracking might cause a stressed fault to slip a little bit earlier than it was already going to, but can't move an inactive fault or slow or stop an active one. So, it's possible that fracking might cause an earthquake to occur earlier than it would have otherwise, but we can't know how much earlier -- a year, a century, or what. What people should not be concerned about is fracking causing major quakes. The forces involved in such events are so immense that it's ludicrous to suggest that any human activity might be relevant in respect to them. It's like suggesting that you might cause a volcano to erupt by stomping up and down on it.

Geothermal: WP says that the Yellowstone Hotspot, being a hot shallow magma column, is an ideal place for geothermal, but does not cite any sources to back this up. My father is more doubtful. His petroleum experience tells him that this spot may be *too* hot, and also too active in our time for drilling activity. He thinks that drillers might experience extensive and repeated damage to equipment and systems, making geothermal energy production impractical. He says the ideal place for shallow geothermal is a dead volcano, the cores of which retain high heat for thousands of years, but has no physical activity that might damage equipment or disrupt operations.
 
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