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(Scientific American)   South Korean government to Creationists, 'Get Farked'   (scientificamerican.com) divider line 113
    More: Hero, Archaeopteryx, South Korean government, South Korean, feathered dinosaurs, creationists, Scientific Method, Darwinism, fossils  
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6769 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Sep 2012 at 9:00 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-07 08:42:24 AM
www.joeydevilla.com
 
2012-09-07 09:16:04 AM
Religious people should be banned from setting curriculum for public school systems.

If you want to teach fantasy as fact, do it on your own time, not the taxpayers'.

/ no idea how the south korean school system works
 
2012-09-07 09:17:11 AM
Oooh, I hope we get a Bevets sighting!
 
2012-09-07 09:19:34 AM

Grither: Oooh, I hope we get a Bevets sighting!


Why? He hasn't had anything new in years. His trolling is old and stale.
 
2012-09-07 09:21:20 AM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Religious people should be banned from setting curriculum for public school systems.

If you want to teach fantasy as fact, do it on your own time, not the taxpayers'.

/ no idea how the south korean school system works


Help, Help my religious liberties are being repressed!
 
2012-09-07 09:22:29 AM

Grither: Oooh, I hope we get a Bevets sighting!


would be cool, but I doubt it

www.biggamehunt.net

/hot
 
2012-09-07 09:27:54 AM

swaniefrmreddeer: Grither: Oooh, I hope we get a Bevets sighting!

Why? He hasn't had anything new in years. His trolling is old and stale.


I advertise on his site.
 
2012-09-07 09:28:34 AM
Good for them.
 
2012-09-07 09:29:59 AM

cousndick: Grither: Oooh, I hope we get a Bevets sighting!

would be cool, but I doubt it



/hot


Bevets is like bigfoot or the locness monster. I have seen this mythical creature mentioned in many threads but I have yet to actually see him in action. I need definitive proof he exists before I will believe.
 
2012-09-07 09:32:53 AM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Religious people should be banned from setting curriculum for public school systems.

If you want to teach fantasy as fact, do it on your own time, not the taxpayers'.

/ no idea how the south korean school system works


Yeah, fark these guys.
 
2012-09-07 09:36:37 AM

swaniefrmreddeer: Why? He hasn't had anything new in years. His trolling is old and stale.


For some of us " old and stale" is all we have left.
 
2012-09-07 09:39:50 AM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Religious people should be banned from setting curriculum for public school systems.

If you want to teach fantasy as fact, do it on your own time, not the taxpayers'.

/ no idea how the south korean school system works


My son goes to a Christian private school.. Thats pretty much the option in Georgia if you want a private school plus I'm a Christian so it works out. Anyhow they have a top ranked science class.. He's in 6th grade and they're already working on some basic physics. There is no reason that Christianity and science can't co-exist. It's fundies like these people and the morons in Alabama that make it appear as though they can't. It's pretty simple for a Christian to take anything science discovers and see how God might play a part in it. The Big Bang (or slow bang as some new theory's suggest) could absolutely have been part of God's plan.

Its a politics game though.. Republicans keeping republicans stupid for the simple purpose of keeping votes. In my opinion there are still wayyyy too many fundies out there but the people I know consider God and science as inter-related. The vast majority of Christians these days do not believe that Dinosaurs walked the Earth 4000 years ago nor do they believe humans have been around for only 10000 years or that Noah really had an Ark with unicorns that didn't make it. Maybe through science we can better understand what God created, how he created it, and maybe get closer to understanding Him.
 
2012-09-07 09:49:26 AM
lucky creationists get to get farked by korean chicks
 
2012-09-07 09:49:30 AM
The STR responded to the news by claiming that the government showed bias in excluding STR members from the expert panel,

Well, no, only experts get to be on expert panels. What school did you get your advanced science degree from?

and says that it will keep fighting for "better" science textbooks.

I'm really enjoying the implications of the quotation marks around better. On the surface, it looks like the article is quoting the fundies' description of the textbooks they're fighting for. However...

/Jesus never makes anything better
//except tacos
 
2012-09-07 09:51:36 AM

falcon176: lucky creationists get to get farked by korean chicks


you say that like its a good thing.
 
2012-09-07 09:54:17 AM
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2012-09-07 09:55:41 AM

TheAlmightyOS: cousndick: Grither: Oooh, I hope we get a Bevets sighting!

would be cool, but I doubt it



/hot

Bevets is like bigfoot or the locness monster. I have seen this mythical creature mentioned in many threads but I have yet to actually see him in action. I need definitive proof he exists before I will believe.


You say that now, but there was once, may moons ago, a pizza thread involving the Bevets. Chicagoers put down their forks and New Yorkers put down their greasy plates. It was something to behold.
 
2012-09-07 09:57:48 AM

xynix: Vegan Meat Popsicle: Religious people should be banned from setting curriculum for public school systems.

If you want to teach fantasy as fact, do it on your own time, not the taxpayers'.

/ no idea how the south korean school system works

My son goes to a Christian private school.. Thats pretty much the option in Georgia if you want a private school plus I'm a Christian so it works out. Anyhow they have a top ranked science class.. He's in 6th grade and they're already working on some basic physics. There is no reason that Christianity and science can't co-exist. It's fundies like these people and the morons in Alabama that make it appear as though they can't. It's pretty simple for a Christian to take anything science discovers and see how God might play a part in it. The Big Bang (or slow bang as some new theory's suggest) could absolutely have been part of God's plan.

Its a politics game though.. Republicans keeping republicans stupid for the simple purpose of keeping votes. In my opinion there are still wayyyy too many fundies out there but the people I know consider God and science as inter-related. The vast majority of Christians these days do not believe that Dinosaurs walked the Earth 4000 years ago nor do they believe humans have been around for only 10000 years or that Noah really had an Ark with unicorns that didn't make it. Maybe through science we can better understand what God created, how he created it, and maybe get closer to understanding Him.


This is the "science describes how" and "religion explains why" argument. The problem with this view is that it really limits scientific inquiry because instead of asking "why does this phenomena happen?" you always get the answer "because Jesus." Imagine if people were studying the Big Bang and were able to describe what happened, but instead of searching for the underlying processes that led to the big bang they just stopped inquiring there because God did it.

A better example of climate change. This is used all the time by climate change deniers. Science at this point has shown us that the Earth is warming. The big question now is why (it's more than likely humans). By your logic, the reason is God so we shouldn't worry about because there is nothing we can do to change God's plan anyway. I've heard this used a lot when conservative politicians say something like "the planet and climate are controlled by God. There is nothing we can do to tamper with it."

I don't mean to eat your lunch because you are better informed than a lot of Christians. I'll take you over Jesus riding a dinosaur person any day, but to throw god into science ruins the objective, measurable nature of scientific inquiry.
 
2012-09-07 09:58:08 AM

poughdrew: TheAlmightyOS: cousndick: Grither: Oooh, I hope we get a Bevets sighting!

would be cool, but I doubt it



/hot

Bevets is like bigfoot or the locness monster. I have seen this mythical creature mentioned in many threads but I have yet to actually see him in action. I need definitive proof he exists before I will believe.

You say that now, but there was once, may moons ago, a pizza thread involving the Bevets. Chicagoers put down their forks and New Yorkers put down their greasy plates. It was something to behold.


I recall with fondness the time I actually got a real response out of him rather than an out-of-context quote. Epic win, that day. A story to tell the grandkids.
 
2012-09-07 10:09:22 AM
Oh Bevets! I remember the guy well. Last I talked with him, he pretty much refused to prove ID until I could prove that the universe had a material nature. In other words, I had to prove every last thing in in the universe had a natural or material cause before he would give one shred of evidence to support his side.

Was quite possibly, the biggest goal post move and shifting of the burden of proof that i'd ever seen.

I eventually did do this, btw, and won three noble prizes, and got six honorary PHDs for it from different schools. I'd post a link, but you'd need a PHD in theoretical physics to understand even the intro synopsis.
 
2012-09-07 10:14:16 AM

ModernPrimitive01: xynix: Vegan Meat Popsicle: Religious people should be banned from setting curriculum for public school systems.

If you want to teach fantasy as fact, do it on your own time, not the taxpayers'.

/ no idea how the south korean school system works

My son goes to a Christian private school.. Thats pretty much the option in Georgia if you want a private school plus I'm a Christian so it works out. Anyhow they have a top ranked science class.. He's in 6th grade and they're already working on some basic physics. There is no reason that Christianity and science can't co-exist. It's fundies like these people and the morons in Alabama that make it appear as though they can't. It's pretty simple for a Christian to take anything science discovers and see how God might play a part in it. The Big Bang (or slow bang as some new theory's suggest) could absolutely have been part of God's plan.

Its a politics game though.. Republicans keeping republicans stupid for the simple purpose of keeping votes. In my opinion there are still wayyyy too many fundies out there but the people I know consider God and science as inter-related. The vast majority of Christians these days do not believe that Dinosaurs walked the Earth 4000 years ago nor do they believe humans have been around for only 10000 years or that Noah really had an Ark with unicorns that didn't make it. Maybe through science we can better understand what God created, how he created it, and maybe get closer to understanding Him.

This is the "science describes how" and "religion explains why" argument. The problem with this view is that it really limits scientific inquiry because instead of asking "why does this phenomena happen?" you always get the answer "because Jesus." Imagine if people were studying the Big Bang and were able to describe what happened, but instead of searching for the underlying processes that led to the big bang they just stopped inquiring there because God did it.

A better example of climate change. ...


Eh... no it doesn't. You find something that explains a phenomenon, and you attribute that to the discovery. No one ever says "we should just leave this to mystery and Jebus" and moves on.
 
2012-09-07 10:25:08 AM
Congratulations GOP - you are now less intelligent than people that believe in Fan Death.
 
2012-09-07 10:32:10 AM
Oppa Darwin Style!

♪ Heeeeey, evolution ♫


Stuck in my head. Now stuck in yours. You're welcome.
 
2012-09-07 10:32:28 AM

Marine1: ModernPrimitive01: xynix: Vegan Meat Popsicle: Religious people should be banned from setting curriculum for public school systems.

If you want to teach fantasy as fact, do it on your own time, not the taxpayers'.

/ no idea how the south korean school system works

My son goes to a Christian private school.. Thats pretty much the option in Georgia if you want a private school plus I'm a Christian so it works out. Anyhow they have a top ranked science class.. He's in 6th grade and they're already working on some basic physics. There is no reason that Christianity and science can't co-exist. It's fundies like these people and the morons in Alabama that make it appear as though they can't. It's pretty simple for a Christian to take anything science discovers and see how God might play a part in it. The Big Bang (or slow bang as some new theory's suggest) could absolutely have been part of God's plan.

Its a politics game though.. Republicans keeping republicans stupid for the simple purpose of keeping votes. In my opinion there are still wayyyy too many fundies out there but the people I know consider God and science as inter-related. The vast majority of Christians these days do not believe that Dinosaurs walked the Earth 4000 years ago nor do they believe humans have been around for only 10000 years or that Noah really had an Ark with unicorns that didn't make it. Maybe through science we can better understand what God created, how he created it, and maybe get closer to understanding Him.

This is the "science describes how" and "religion explains why" argument. The problem with this view is that it really limits scientific inquiry because instead of asking "why does this phenomena happen?" you always get the answer "because Jesus." Imagine if people were studying the Big Bang and were able to describe what happened, but instead of searching for the underlying processes that led to the big bang they just stopped inquiring there because God did it.

A better example ...


Link

"The arrogance of people to think that we, human beings, would be able to change what He is doing in the climate is to me outrageous." Link 

There are more, but it's not my job to educate you
 
2012-09-07 10:32:36 AM

TheAlmightyOS: cousndick: Grither: Oooh, I hope we get a Bevets sighting!

would be cool, but I doubt it

/hot

Bevets is like bigfoot or the locness monster. I have seen this mythical creature mentioned in many threads but I have yet to actually see him in action. I need definitive proof he exists before I will believe.


In a recent TotalFark Discussion thread, Bevets actually posted a comment that wasn't
creationist drivel in response to one of my comments.

It was only the second time I've ever seen 'him' post something that wasn't canned copypasta (the
first time was a comment in a thread about some actress that implied he was a leg man).

Apparently, he's a pretty good guy. Apart from the whole not believing in science stuff.
 
2012-09-07 10:42:11 AM
How can they keep Creationism out of the schools? That's downright un-American!
 
2012-09-07 10:48:47 AM

Marine1: Yeah, fark these guys.


Pretty much, yea. Why should people who believe in magic be teaching anybody anything? I could go put a quarter in the fortune telling machine at the arcade if I wanted that.

xynix: There is no reason that Christianity and science can't co-exist.


Yea, there is. Magic isn't real, it never was and it never will be, so there's only two outcomes that are possible here for any given religious person:

1. Stop being religious about something every time it's proven bullshiat. In which case, what's the point in the first place? Why not just admit you don't know something in the first place instead of inventing some ridiculous fantasy claptrap about it?

2. Wait until "the line" is crossed by scientists and become the new fundie who won't accept a new, inconvenient reality.

Magic isn't real, ghosts don't exist and some crazy-ass genie in the sky didn't wink everything into existence. If you can't accept the most fundamental realities of our universe, it's only a matter of time until science peels something back that hits on your particular nerve and you turn into the retard brow-beating people with your stupid book full of acid trips and fairy tales. 

You either accept the reality you live in or you don't, and if you don't, you shouldn't be educating other people about it on public time and money.
 
2012-09-07 10:49:56 AM
If exposing your kid to an hour or two on the theory of evolution will undo a decade or more of religious training, you're doing it wrong.
 
2012-09-07 10:54:33 AM

ModernPrimitive01: This is the "science describes how" and "religion explains why" argument. The problem with this view is that it really limits scientific inquiry because instead of asking "why does this phenomena happen?" you always get the answer "because Jesus." Imagine if people were studying the Big Bang and were able to describe what happened, but instead of searching for the underlying processes that led to the big bang they just stopped inquiring there because God did it.

A better example of climate change. This is used all the time by climate change deniers. Science at this point has shown us that the Earth is warming. The big question now is why (it's more than likely humans). By your logic, the reason is God so we shouldn't worry about because there is nothing we can do to change God's plan anyway. I've heard this used a lot when conservative politicians say something like "the planet and climate are controlled by God. There is nothing we can do to tamper with it."

I don't mean to eat your lunch because you are better informed than a lot of Christians. I'll take you over Jesus riding a dinosaur person any day, but to throw god into science ruins the objective, measurable nature of scientific inquiry.


Good post. Would read again!
 
2012-09-07 10:55:47 AM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Marine1: Yeah, fark these guys.

Pretty much, yea. Why should people who believe in magic be teaching anybody anything? I could go put a quarter in the fortune telling machine at the arcade if I wanted that.

xynix: There is no reason that Christianity and science can't co-exist.

Yea, there is. Magic isn't real, it never was and it never will be, so there's only two outcomes that are possible here for any given religious person:

1. Stop being religious about something every time it's proven bullshiat. In which case, what's the point in the first place? Why not just admit you don't know something in the first place instead of inventing some ridiculous fantasy claptrap about it?

2. Wait until "the line" is crossed by scientists and become the new fundie who won't accept a new, inconvenient reality.

Magic isn't real, ghosts don't exist and some crazy-ass genie in the sky didn't wink everything into existence. If you can't accept the most fundamental realities of our universe, it's only a matter of time until science peels something back that hits on your particular nerve and you turn into the retard brow-beating people with your stupid book full of acid trips and fairy tales. 

You either accept the reality you live in or you don't, and if you don't, you shouldn't be educating other people about it on public time and money.



And yet, despite your either-or dichotomy, half of scientists are believers, according to this Pew poll.
According to the poll, just over half of scientists (51%) believe in some form of deity or higher power; specifically, 33% of scientists say they believe in God, while 18% believe in a universal spirit or higher power.
 
2012-09-07 11:13:20 AM

GilRuiz1: Vegan Meat Popsicle: Marine1: Yeah, fark these guys.

Pretty much, yea. Why should people who believe in magic be teaching anybody anything? I could go put a quarter in the fortune telling machine at the arcade if I wanted that.

xynix: There is no reason that Christianity and science can't co-exist.

Yea, there is. Magic isn't real, it never was and it never will be, so there's only two outcomes that are possible here for any given religious person:

1. Stop being religious about something every time it's proven bullshiat. In which case, what's the point in the first place? Why not just admit you don't know something in the first place instead of inventing some ridiculous fantasy claptrap about it?

2. Wait until "the line" is crossed by scientists and become the new fundie who won't accept a new, inconvenient reality.

Magic isn't real, ghosts don't exist and some crazy-ass genie in the sky didn't wink everything into existence. If you can't accept the most fundamental realities of our universe, it's only a matter of time until science peels something back that hits on your particular nerve and you turn into the retard brow-beating people with your stupid book full of acid trips and fairy tales. 

You either accept the reality you live in or you don't, and if you don't, you shouldn't be educating other people about it on public time and money.


And yet, despite your either-or dichotomy, half of scientists are believers, according to this Pew poll.According to the poll, just over half of scientists (51%) believe in some form of deity or higher power; specifically, 33% of scientists say they believe in God, while 18% believe in a universal spirit or higher power.


Believing in something, and proposing magic as a solution to a scientific question are two different things entirely.
 
2012-09-07 11:13:26 AM

GilRuiz1: And yet, despite your either-or dichotomy, half of scientists are believers, according to this Pew poll.

According to the poll, just over half of scientists (51%) believe in some form of deity or higher power; specifically, 33% of scientists say they believe in God, while 18% believe in a universal spirit or higher power.


Cognitive dissonance is neither new nor rare. And I think it's somewhat disingenuous to lump together "universal spirit or higher power" with "God" because the former may not actually be a religious thought at all, while the latter most definitely is. Something like 97% of the most highly respected and influential scientists (members of the NAS, for instance) do not believe in a person god.
 
2012-09-07 11:21:26 AM

xynix: The vast majority of Christians these days do not believe that . . . humans have been around for only 10000 years


Well...

sas-origin.onstreammedia.com 

This is a poll conducted across all Americans, and the largest slice of this graph is "God created human beings pretty much in their present form at one time within the last 10,000 years or so," currently at 46% and apparently rising. Toss out the 15 percent who believe in non-divinely inspired evolution under the assumption that they're not Christians (I guess they'd be Deists at most), and the percentage climbs to nearly 60%. Even accounting for the possibility that some of these are young-earth creationists of Muslim, Jewish, or other faiths, the number strongly indicates a majority of American Christians believe in YEC. Not a vast majority, but still. Worldwide, that number is probably smaller, but given the political context around your statement I'll confine the numbers to the U.S. Also, this poll doesn't strictly separate the age of the earth itself from the age of humanity, but the "10,000 years" response is at least consistent with a young earth.
 
2012-09-07 11:23:39 AM

Antimatter: Believing in something, and proposing magic as a solution to a scientific question are two different things entirely.


Yeah, kind of like how some think everything came from nothing. Totally scientific, that assumption.....not.
Kind of like an ant saying that humans don't exist, only because they can't understand what they observe,
mainly because they don't have the intelligence to put it all in context.
Go ahead little bipedal proplasm beings, assume you know everything.
God forgives you....if you repent.
Ancient Rome, like so many others, didn't believe, now long gone.
Whose turn is next?
 
2012-09-07 11:33:09 AM

Kurmudgeon: Yeah, kind of like how some think everything came from nothing. Totally scientific, that assumption.....not.


a) if that's where the evidence points, it would be folly of us to deny it
b) sometimes equating "nothing" with "we don't know yet" is pretty stupid
c) substituting "we don't know yet" with "god did it" is always pretty stupid
 
2012-09-07 11:37:35 AM
Society for Textbook Revise? Really?
 
2012-09-07 11:37:44 AM

Kurmudgeon: Antimatter: Believing in something, and proposing magic as a solution to a scientific question are two different things entirely.

Yeah, kind of like how some think everything came from nothing. Totally scientific, that assumption.....not.
Kind of like an ant saying that humans don't exist, only because they can't understand what they observe,
mainly because they don't have the intelligence to put it all in context.
Go ahead little bipedal proplasm beings, assume you know everything.
God forgives you....if you repent.
Ancient Rome, like so many others, didn't believe, now long gone.
Whose turn is next?


Actually, the Romans did believe. Constantine converted to Christianity in the fourth (?) century.

I guess they should have taught more creationism.
 
2012-09-07 11:37:57 AM

Kome: c) substituting "we don't know yet" with "god did it" is always pretty stupid


For centuries, the line has been "God did it, let's find out how." Everybody from Francis Bacon to Isaac Newton shared this same idea. It's a shame that some segments of Christianity seems to have forgotten it.
 
2012-09-07 11:49:59 AM

xynix: Vegan Meat Popsicle: Religious people should be banned from setting curriculum for public school systems.

If you want to teach fantasy as fact, do it on your own time, not the taxpayers'.

/ no idea how the south korean school system works

My son goes to a Christian private school.. Thats pretty much the option in Georgia if you want a private school plus I'm a Christian so it works out. Anyhow they have a top ranked science class.. He's in 6th grade and they're already working on some basic physics. There is no reason that Christianity and science can't co-exist. It's fundies like these people and the morons in Alabama that make it appear as though they can't. It's pretty simple for a Christian to take anything science discovers and see how God might play a part in it. The Big Bang (or slow bang as some new theory's suggest) could absolutely have been part of God's plan.

Its a politics game though.. Republicans keeping republicans stupid for the simple purpose of keeping votes. In my opinion there are still wayyyy too many fundies out there but the people I know consider God and science as inter-related. The vast majority of Christians these days do not believe that Dinosaurs walked the Earth 4000 years ago nor do they believe humans have been around for only 10000 years or that Noah really had an Ark with unicorns that didn't make it. Maybe through science we can better understand what God created, how he created it, and maybe get closer to understanding Him.


I would like to thank you for your words. I agree on everything you said. And being of the same faith, I can see the concepts as well. I actually had friendly debates with biologist about that topic too. Where both parties can see where we both come from.
 
2012-09-07 11:57:23 AM

Kurmudgeon: Antimatter: Believing in something, and proposing magic as a solution to a scientific question are two different things entirely.

Yeah, kind of like how some think everything came from nothing. Totally scientific, that assumption.....not.
Kind of like an ant saying that humans don't exist, only because they can't understand what they observe,
mainly because they don't have the intelligence to put it all in context.
Go ahead little bipedal proplasm beings, assume you know everything.
God forgives you....if you repent.
Ancient Rome, like so many others, didn't believe, now long gone.
Whose turn is next?


That caught my eye cause I know several humans who do that and worse, even when asked for forgiveness, never gives it. They are sad little people who hold grudges for years. And you should always ask for forgiveness. It is the right thing to do even if you know that person will forgive you. To assume so is wrong.
 
2012-09-07 11:59:52 AM

born_yesterday: Actually, the Romans did believe. Constantine converted to Christianity in the fourth (?) century.


See? They became an officially Christian empire, and they got sacked by barbarians.
This is what happens when you turn your back on Zeus for that false Jew god.
 
2012-09-07 12:07:37 PM
a research firm based in Seoul, found that of 613 respondents, 45% believed in evolution and 32% believed in creationism

and i guess the other 23% don't know.
 
2012-09-07 12:12:40 PM

Kurmudgeon:
Ancient Rome, like so many others, didn't believe, now long gone.


Constantine I called and said you're a farking retard.
 
2012-09-07 12:25:48 PM

TheAlmightyOS: cousndick: Grither: Oooh, I hope we get a Bevets sighting!

would be cool, but I doubt it



/hot

Bevets is like bigfoot or the locness monster. I have seen this mythical creature mentioned in many threads but I have yet to actually see him in action. I need definitive proof he exists before I will believe.


Bevets has passed the Turing test, in a thread with a headline I submitted that directly trolled him.

Well... "trolling" is a strong word. I don't dislike him. His "evolutionism is the tinfoil hat" line had become a meme unto itself.

He's dropped out of sight since he got taken to task for stating that Christians have never participated in genocidal acts. Ah, well...
 
2012-09-07 12:33:23 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Marine1: Yeah, fark these guys.

Pretty much, yea. Why should people who believe in magic be teaching anybody anything? I could go put a quarter in the fortune telling machine at the arcade if I wanted that.

xynix: There is no reason that Christianity and science can't co-exist.

Yea, there is. Magic isn't real, it never was and it never will be, so there's only two outcomes that are possible here for any given religious person:

1. Stop being religious about something every time it's proven bullshiat. In which case, what's the point in the first place? Why not just admit you don't know something in the first place instead of inventing some ridiculous fantasy claptrap about it?

2. Wait until "the line" is crossed by scientists and become the new fundie who won't accept a new, inconvenient reality.

Magic isn't real, ghosts don't exist and some crazy-ass genie in the sky didn't wink everything into existence. If you can't accept the most fundamental realities of our universe, it's only a matter of time until science peels something back that hits on your particular nerve and you turn into the retard brow-beating people with your stupid book full of acid trips and fairy tales. 

You either accept the reality you live in or you don't, and if you don't, you shouldn't be educating other people about it on public time and money.


Then I guess you're recusing yourself from educating people on the public dime?
 
2012-09-07 01:06:30 PM

GilRuiz1: Kome: c) substituting "we don't know yet" with "god did it" is always pretty stupid

For centuries, the line has been "God did it, let's find out how." Everybody from Francis Bacon to Isaac Newton shared this same idea. It's a shame that some segments of Christianity seems to have forgotten it.


I would disagree. Reading Newton, his work stopped when he invoked divinity to explain what he hadn't yet discovered an answer to. The movement of the planets, for example, when his own work wasn't sufficient to explain that and he resorted to the clockwork design of the universe by God, that was the end of it. He may have tried to continue figuring out an answer, but he didn't bother to propose anything, either privately or publicly, aside from divine fiat.

I haven't read Bacon to draw a similar conclusion, so I'll refrain from assuming similarly about him, but Newton certainly did not appear to try and find out how after he had to invoke a god.
 
2012-09-07 01:10:31 PM

Kome: GilRuiz1: Kome: c) substituting "we don't know yet" with "god did it" is always pretty stupid

For centuries, the line has been "God did it, let's find out how." Everybody from Francis Bacon to Isaac Newton shared this same idea. It's a shame that some segments of Christianity seems to have forgotten it.

I would disagree. Reading Newton, his work stopped when he invoked divinity to explain what he hadn't yet discovered an answer to. The movement of the planets, for example, when his own work wasn't sufficient to explain that and he resorted to the clockwork design of the universe by God, that was the end of it. He may have tried to continue figuring out an answer, but he didn't bother to propose anything, either privately or publicly, aside from divine fiat.

I haven't read Bacon to draw a similar conclusion, so I'll refrain from assuming similarly about him, but Newton certainly did not appear to try and find out how after he had to invoke a god.


Well, you have to keep in mind, math and physics were what Newton did for fun on the weekends. He considered his theology to be his most important work, even if he couldn't discuss all of it because of the religious climate at the time. He might be a bad example for that purpose.
 
2012-09-07 01:17:07 PM
The STR, an offshoot of the Korea Association for Creation Research, says that students should learn "various" theories about the development of life on Earth.

If only there WERE various theories about the development of life on Earth
 
2012-09-07 01:22:10 PM

Marine1: He might be a bad example for that purpose.


The two names I cited were intended to be representatives of the fathers of Western science; think Copernicus, Halley, Kepler, Mendel, Boyle, and all those other big-wig-wearing European yahoos that came up with what we now call science. It was universally agreed that God had done it; their explorations were efforts to discover how.
 
2012-09-07 01:24:57 PM

GilRuiz1: Marine1: He might be a bad example for that purpose.

The two names I cited were intended to be representatives of the fathers of Western science; think Copernicus, Halley, Kepler, Mendel, Boyle, and all those other big-wig-wearing European yahoos that came up with what we now call science. It was universally agreed that God had done it; their explorations were efforts to discover how.


True. I'm just saying to the other Farker that it's probably explainable why Newton cut it off at "God did it" when he reached a certain point.

Furthermore, you also have a limitation on what he could actually know at the time.
 
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