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(Labspaces.net)   Scientists have succeeded in completing a 143 kilometer teleportation. Unfortunately, the data turned inside out. And exploded   (labspaces.net) divider line 184
    More: Interesting, Tenerife, Chinese Academy of Sciences, quantum information processing, quantum states, University of Waterloo, optical fibers, quantum physics, Anton Zeilinger  
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20838 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Sep 2012 at 3:06 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-06 03:46:44 PM  

Somaticasual: Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.

A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?


Covered :

i291.photobucket.com

CLICK FOR LINK

/why yes, I am a trekker, why do you ask?
 
2012-09-06 03:47:50 PM  
When do I get my ACU?

/would settle for a Monkeylord
 
2012-09-06 03:48:49 PM  

Oznog: Star Trek didn't invent teleportertation


You could have stopped there, you know :-D
 
2012-09-06 03:48:53 PM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries:

The sounds those things made scarred me for LIFE!


i.imgur.com

Can you believe that original farking movie was rated "G" ?

With that scene of horrific screaming and guts being turned inside out? I'm still scarred too.
 
2012-09-06 03:48:59 PM  

Somaticasual: Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.

A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?


Isn't absolute zero theoretical? I mean, I get the idea, but has it ever been created in a lab? And if so, could it be observed?
 
2012-09-06 03:49:51 PM  

Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.


When you talk that way, I get hard.
 
2012-09-06 03:49:56 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Now I'm going kayaking, biking, walking and all the things you won't be able to do in space...


With that kind of attitude the world would still be flat and we'd all be living in africa.
 
2012-09-06 03:51:10 PM  

SpiceWeaselElzar: Somaticasual: Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.

A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?

Isn't absolute zero theoretical? I mean, I get the idea, but has it ever been created in a lab? And if so, could it be observed?


Aye, pretty sure absolute zero is theoretical (and, according to theory, cannot actually be reached. It's sort of an asymptote).

But, I'm in nanophysics, and an experimentalist (theory would drive me batshiat), and a few years removed from the courses-but, yes, that's what I remember!
 
2012-09-06 03:51:28 PM  
www.hwdyk.com
 
2012-09-06 03:51:29 PM  

SpiceWeaselElzar: Somaticasual: Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.

A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?

Isn't absolute zero theoretical? I mean, I get the idea, but has it ever been created in a lab? And if so, could it be observed?


Pretty sure it's theoretical at least in terms of observable phenomenon. But it stands to reason that if you stop time, or completely stop momentum, you would have absolute zero since heat relies on at least some level of movement.
 
2012-09-06 03:52:53 PM  

Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.


It's not so much about communicating data, it's about _securely_ communicating data. Collapsing the wave function at your end gives a corresponding pattern of states at the other end, meaning that both you and the recipient now have matching encryption keys without sending said keys through some delivery system where they can be hijacked by a man in the middle and your message read.

Current encryption protocols are limited by the fact that, well, you have to either have already given the key to the recipient in the past (so it never changes, meaning if it's stolen once you're compromised forever) or you have to transmit it to them before (or I guess after) sending the message, where it can be intercepted. You just have to time it so that the receiving computer reads the states within a relaxation interval of the sending computer. Which can be a pretty short time, but iirc some relaxation periods can be extended artificially by various engineering workarounds.
 
2012-09-06 03:53:31 PM  

Jument: Sadly yeah, teleportation is almost certainly completely impossible. To reconstitute a brain you would have to reconstitute not only the cells but electrical charges and stuff. I hate to say never but it's never going to happen. You could jump through a wormhole or pop into hyperspace, of course. Much easier than true teleportation.


Who knows? We are just in the begging of this technology, these kinds of statements have a way of coming back and biting you like, "Guitar bands are on the way out" or "There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home" Just because we can't conceive of it now doesn't mean it won't happen, or that we shouldn't try.
 
2012-09-06 03:55:08 PM  
FTFA: Physicists at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have achieved quantum teleportation over a record distance of 143 km. The experiment is a major step towards satellite-based quantum communication.

So if I'm reading this correctly, I'll soon be able to use satellites to teleport anywhere in the world.

/Full Disclosure: It's possible that I'm not reading this correctly
 
2012-09-06 03:56:01 PM  
That was a hell of a thing.
 
2012-09-06 03:56:14 PM  
practical application = 4,200 more cable channels!



/where's my flying car, gotdammit?!
 
2012-09-06 03:56:54 PM  
TheSlothAlive:

liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

Came for the Ender's Game Ursula K. LeGuin reference, leaving satisfied
 
2012-09-06 03:57:15 PM  

Somacandra: Thanks for the Meme-ries:

The sounds those things made scarred me for LIFE!

[i.imgur.com image 850x72]

Can you believe that original farking movie was rated "G" ?

With that scene of horrific screaming and guts being turned inside out? I'm still scarred too.


Yup. That f*cked with me as well.
 
2012-09-06 03:57:23 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: TuteTibiImperes: Quantum Apostrophe: We sure are getting good at this whole information thing. But we still fly turbofans on aluminum alloy airplanes.

Hey, NASA almost got a scramjet working not too long ago.

Oh Jesus, the same scramjets we've had working for decades? Experimentally? Where they blow up or malfunction after a few minutes because of limits of materials and engineering?

And we don't even have Concorde anymore, but we'll have magical scramjets? Right?

Carousel Beast: Isn't this where you remind us that nothing useful ever came out of space exploration or technology? Because they seem to be going down that path.

Interesting twisted logic. Are you telling me the scientists did this research so people could live on the Moon?

Seems to me it's the usual "we find something here first, then apply it to space later" thing. Just like with everything else related to space...

And how is putting a satellite in orbit, where we already have shiat tons of satellites, "exploring"? Isn't that exploring done since decades? We're just using LEO and GEO to bounce signals around.

...and ???? Does this lead to manned space colonies? Hmmm? Does it?

This isn't a new material, it isn't a new energy source.

It's signal processing. The only thing that we've improved by orders and orders of magnitude since WWII.

Carousel Beast: And we don't live 1,000 years, either.

If that's your argument, I can say "we don't live on Mars either", right?

Except I have that whole physics thing on my side.

You don't.

So sorry.

[thesmatter.files.wordpress.com image 325x325]

Now I'm going kayaking, biking, walking and all the things you won't be able to do in space...


I'm not sure what your argument here is, it seems to be "we haven't figured this stuff out yet, so we should stop trying" is that it?

We could build another concorde tomorrow if there was a business case for it. Advances in biofuel production, or solar/wind/fission/fusion-driven hydrogen production could make something like the concorde viable again. As far as scramjets go, nothing works until it does. Keep pouring enough time, money, and research into it and they'll figure out a way.

Advances in communications will bring the idea of deep space travel and colonization closer to feasibility. Right now the Curiosity rover can't even transmit everything it finds because the data connection to marks is so slow and spotty. Before we even think about putting a base on mars we'll need to find a way to communicate much more consistently.
 
2012-09-06 03:58:54 PM  

Creative Name: take me apart, take me apart
what a way to roam
but if you have to take me apart to get me there
I'd rather stay at home


I teleported home one night
With Ron and Sid and Meg.
Ron stole Meggie's heart away
And I got Sidney's leg.
 
2012-09-06 03:59:17 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Of course the most disturbing part is the question of what happens from your point of view when you get transported. You'd think that from your POV, you die instantly as you are torn apart on a atomic level and that the person that is reconstituted on the other end only think they are you because they have all of your memories. There'd just be no way to know what happens from a person's perspective.


It helps if you Think Like a Dinosaur.
 
2012-09-06 03:59:17 PM  

VonKraut: Just because we can't conceive of it now doesn't mean it won't happen, or that we shouldn't try.


Yep, laws of physics be damned. I will get this camel through the eye of this needle, if I just push hard enough!

/try, try again
 
2012-09-06 04:00:22 PM  

Headso: Quantum Apostrophe: Now I'm going kayaking, biking, walking and all the things you won't be able to do in space...

With that kind of attitude the world would still be flat and we'd all be living in africa.


I'm not sure who's worse, the Luddites or those in the science fields who think that because they don't believe something is possible that no one else will ever figure it out.
 
2012-09-06 04:01:33 PM  

Jim_Callahan: It's not so much about communicating data, it's about _securely_ communicating data. Collapsing the wave function at your end gives a corresponding pattern of states at the other end, meaning that both you and the recipient now have matching encryption keys without sending said keys through some delivery system where they can be hijacked by a man in the middle and your message read.

Current encryption protocols are limited by the fact that, well, you have to either have already given the key to the recipient in the past (so it never changes, meaning if it's stolen once you're compromised forever) or you have to transmit it to them before (or I guess after) sending the message, where it can be intercepted. You just have to time it so that the receiving computer reads the states within a relaxation interval of the sending computer. Which can be a pretty short time, but iirc some relaxation periods can be extended artificially by various engineering workarounds.


Oh! Yes, I know how quantum cryptography works, I actually had to do a presentation in a cryptography class (as I and one other person were the only physics majors, and the math teacher was having difficulty with the quantum mechanics). It's so wonderfully clever, iddnit? A theoretically secure method of sending a one time pad-and I suppose quantum teleportation would be still more secure. .

But I thought they were talking the Ansible, which I believe was the FTL communication from ender's game that theoretically used 'Spooky Action At a Distance' to transmit messages at FTL speeds.

Which *isn't* possible with the current understanding of Quantum Mechanics (as far as I remember).
 
2012-09-06 04:02:16 PM  

Somaticasual: A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?


Humans are macro-scale objects and cells are micro-scale. Assembling, say, a brain with an identical set of connections or a body with the same general chemical and cellular structure, once you factor out all the chemical factors that are pretty much identical in every human, and genetic material, which can all be more or less reassembled no problem with only forseeable advances in science... reassembling a human within undetectable error bars is an endeavour that has nothing whatsoever to do with quantum anything.

Short version: nothing that makes an individual human individual or human is susceptible to Heisenberg uncertainty. Quantum states are irrelevant to biological and mental function. A reassembling teleporter doesn't have to get every particle in the right place to make you you.
 
2012-09-06 04:02:18 PM  

Somaticasual: A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?


Duh. That's why they use Heisenberg Compensators.
 
2012-09-06 04:03:14 PM  

gweilo8888: VonKraut: Just because we can't conceive of it now doesn't mean it won't happen, or that we shouldn't try.

Yep, laws of physics be damned. I will get this camel through the eye of this needle, if I just push hard enough!

/try, try again


Liquid camel time!!!
 
2012-09-06 04:03:54 PM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: Somaticasual: Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.

A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?

Covered :



CLICK FOR LINK

/why yes, I am a trekker, why do you ask?


Little known fact, they are really called Heisenberg Compensators because Walter White is such a badass that HE knows the position and momentum of every particle precisely.
 
2012-09-06 04:04:26 PM  
So whose ansible came first, Ursula K. Le Guin's or the Ender guy?
 
2012-09-06 04:04:49 PM  

Creative Name: take me apart, take me apart
what a way to roam
but if you have to take me apart to get me there
I'd rather stay at home


I teleported home one night
With Ron and Sid and Meg.
Ron stole Meggie's heart away
And I got Sidney's leg.
 
2012-09-06 04:04:57 PM  
Ziggy said there was only an 8% chance that this article would be greenlit. Guess who came out on top!

blastr.com

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to go back in time and be Elvis for a day.
 
2012-09-06 04:06:05 PM  
Teleportation doesn't build me sex robots.

Or at least a holodeck. For porn.
Pornodeck. Hmm...Holoporn.
 
2012-09-06 04:06:44 PM  

Somaticasual: Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.

A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?


I think you'd have to be frozen to start with in any case because the scanning/disassembly process couldn't be instantaneous. Anyone scanned alive would probably bleed out during the process.
 
2012-09-06 04:08:16 PM  
simplicimus:

So whose ansible came first, Ursula K. Le Guin's or the Ender guy?

LeGuin, by over a decade.
 
2012-09-06 04:09:14 PM  

Jument: Sadly yeah, teleportation is almost certainly completely impossible. To reconstitute a brain you would have to reconstitute not only the cells but electrical charges and stuff. I hate to say never but it's never going to happen. You could jump through a wormhole or pop into hyperspace, of course. Much easier than true teleportation.


Not if you created a field that could reassign a quark's spatial position probability. 3 fields layered together to create a portal. One reverts a quark to a wave, the second reassigns it's position, the third collapses the waveform.
 
2012-09-06 04:11:49 PM  
The flesh. It should make the computer, uh crazy. Like those old ladies pinching babies.
 
2012-09-06 04:11:50 PM  
Sounds like we can finally get some untraceable data transfer devices in the future.

How do you trace/tap teleportation? It's not leaving a trail behind to follow; it's here...*POOF* now it's there.
 
2012-09-06 04:12:08 PM  

jeanwearinfool: Jument: Sadly yeah, teleportation is almost certainly completely impossible. To reconstitute a brain you would have to reconstitute not only the cells but electrical charges and stuff. I hate to say never but it's never going to happen. You could jump through a wormhole or pop into hyperspace, of course. Much easier than true teleportation.

Not if you created a field that could reassign a quark's spatial position probability. 3 fields layered together to create a portal. One reverts a quark to a wave, the second reassigns it's position, the third collapses the waveform.


But what if you get splinched?
 
2012-09-06 04:14:42 PM  
Felgraf: 'Spooky Action At a Distance' to transmit messages at FTL speeds.

This key issue is not addressed by the article.

We managed to perform a quantum teleportation experiment. In satellite-based experiments, the distances to be travelled are longer, but the signal will have to pass through less atmosphere.

If the experiment described were actually pure quantum information teleportation, what is the medium of the "signal"?
 
2012-09-06 04:16:08 PM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 799x342]

[i291.photobucket.com image 320x320]

The sounds those things made scarred me for LIFE!


Came for these, leaving satisfied.

/Enterprise...
//what we got back didn't live long... fortunately
 
2012-09-06 04:16:15 PM  

Felgraf: But I thought they were talking the Ansible, which I believe was the FTL communication from ender's game that theoretically used 'Spooky Action At a Distance' to transmit messages at FTL speeds.


they didn't even go that far, they hand wavied the whole thing and said, we got it from teh formics.
 
2012-09-06 04:17:58 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Thanks for the Meme-ries: Somaticasual: Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.

A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?

Covered :



CLICK FOR LINK

/why yes, I am a trekker, why do you ask?

Little known fact, they are really called Heisenberg Compensators because Walter White is such a badass that HE knows the position and momentum of every particle precisely.


i291.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-06 04:18:35 PM  

Kellner21: I teleported home one night
With Ron and Sid and Meg.
Ron stole Meggie's heart away
And I got Sidney's leg.


Were you all in love with dying? Were you drinking from a fountain that was pouring like an avalanche coming down the mountain?

/obscure?
 
2012-09-06 04:18:59 PM  

TheSlothAlive: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

Came for the Ender's Game reference, leaving satisfied


Came for the person who thought Orson Scott Card came up with Ursula K. Le Guin's word and concept, leaving smugly pedantic and satisfied.
 
2012-09-06 04:21:43 PM  

Somaticasual: SpiceWeaselElzar: Somaticasual: Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.

A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?

Isn't absolute zero theoretical? I mean, I get the idea, but has it ever been created in a lab? And if so, could it be observed?

Pretty sure it's theoretical at least in terms of observable phenomenon. But it stands to reason that if you stop time, or completely stop momentum, you would have absolute zero since heat relies on at least some level of movement.


It's not theoretical. We can't achieve it here on Earth due to the fact that it's basically impossible due to the transfer of heat energy from the device to say...the ground. HOWEVER, we can experiment in absolute zero easily, just have to walk outside the ISS on the dark side...or go to the moon again.
 
2012-09-06 04:21:58 PM  

semiotix: leaving smugly pedantic and satisfied.


...and late to the pedant party, I see. My ansible must be malfunctioning.
 
2012-09-06 04:22:18 PM  
WhoGAS:

Sounds like we can finally get some untraceable data transfer devices in the future.

How do you trace/tap teleportation? It's not leaving a trail behind to follow; it's here...*POOF* now it's there.


That's actually one of the expected uses of it... Any attempt to tap the stream would garbage it, so it's not just the most secure possible transmission method in practice, it's the most secure possible in theory as well.
 
2012-09-06 04:25:47 PM  

Somacandra: Thanks for the Meme-ries:

The sounds those things made scarred me for LIFE!

[i.imgur.com image 850x72]

Can you believe that original farking movie was rated "G" ?

i291.photobucket.com.

 
2012-09-06 04:27:27 PM  

maxheck: simplicimus:

So whose ansible came first, Ursula K. Le Guin's or the Ender guy?

LeGuin, by over a decade.


Very cool. Never read Rocannon's World but thanks for the heads up.

[themoreyouknow.jpg]

/ not the biggest sci-fi/fantasy reader
// just started Revelation Space because some farker recommended it and so far it's a pretty fun read, thanks to whoever
/// just saw lighthuggers referenced somewhere else on fark today
 
2012-09-06 04:28:39 PM  
"Mad_Radhu: Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 799x342]

[i291.photobucket.com image 320x320]

The sounds those things made scarred me for LIFE!

Of course the most disturbing part is the question of what happens from your point of view when you get transported. You'd think that from your POV, you die instantly as you are torn apart on a atomic level and that the person that is reconstituted on the other end only think they are you because they have all of your memories. There'd just be no way to know what happens from a person's perspective."


Sounds like this one time I tried Salvia....
 
2012-09-06 04:30:41 PM  

Sgygus: Felgraf: 'Spooky Action At a Distance' to transmit messages at FTL speeds.

This key issue is not addressed by the article.

We managed to perform a quantum teleportation experiment. In satellite-based experiments, the distances to be travelled are longer, but the signal will have to pass through less atmosphere.

If the experiment described were actually pure quantum information teleportation, what is the medium of the "signal"?


I think these things are usually done with a split beam of light.
 
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