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(Labspaces.net)   Scientists have succeeded in completing a 143 kilometer teleportation. Unfortunately, the data turned inside out. And exploded   (labspaces.net) divider line 184
    More: Interesting, Tenerife, Chinese Academy of Sciences, quantum information processing, quantum states, University of Waterloo, optical fibers, quantum physics, Anton Zeilinger  
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20832 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Sep 2012 at 3:06 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-06 01:45:29 PM
Bones McCoy nods knowingly
 
2012-09-06 01:56:11 PM
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-09-06 01:56:23 PM
Never give up. Never surrender.
 
2012-09-06 01:57:12 PM
By Grabthar's Hammer, what a headline.
 
2012-09-06 02:21:33 PM
I love this thread already.
 
2012-09-06 02:23:50 PM
Glad to see I'm not the only one thinking of the poor pig lizard...

cdn5.movieclips.com

/hot - like I'd imagine the steaming pile of p-l guts to be
 
2012-09-06 02:24:21 PM
Brundlefly?
 
2012-09-06 02:28:56 PM
So, I don't have to worry about rush hour anymore?

/should probably RTFA
 
2012-09-06 02:39:14 PM

HST's Dead Carcass: So, I don't have to worry about rush hour anymore?

/should probably RTFA


Maybe won't have to wait so long to download 9 TB of porn, at any rate...

/the "matter transportation" happens later
 
2012-09-06 03:06:52 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: Brundlefly?


www.tentonhammer.com
 
2012-09-06 03:07:45 PM

slayer199: [25.media.tumblr.com image 500x281]


Came for this. Leaving extremely satisfied.
 
2012-09-06 03:10:00 PM
Sounds like an awesome weapon.
 
2012-09-06 03:10:39 PM
i291.photobucket.com

i291.photobucket.com

The sounds those things made scarred me for LIFE!
 
2012-09-06 03:12:47 PM
Wait till TSA gets a hold of this.
 
2012-09-06 03:13:16 PM
moviesmedia.ign.com

"It wasn't your fault, Rand."

/RIP Cmdr. Sonak
 
2012-09-06 03:13:21 PM
We sure are getting good at this whole information thing. But we still fly turbofans on aluminum alloy airplanes.
 
2012-09-06 03:15:49 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: We sure are getting good at this whole information thing. But we still fly turbofans on aluminum alloy airplanes.


And we don't live 1,000 years, either.

FTFA: The experiment is a major step towards satellite-based quantum communication

Isn't this where you remind us that nothing useful ever came out of space exploration or technology? Because they seem to be going down that path.
 
2012-09-06 03:16:39 PM
As long as we're not doing episode 86

/I die in that one
 
2012-09-06 03:17:11 PM
GORIGNAK! GORIGNAK! GORIGNAK! GORIGNAK!
 
2012-09-06 03:18:00 PM
wonder if they'll come up with transparent aluminum next
 
2012-09-06 03:19:19 PM
www.movieactors.com

Why didn't anyone tell me my ass was so big?!?!
 
2012-09-06 03:20:37 PM
Wait!! Look around you, see if you can't form some sort of rudeamentry lathe.
 
2012-09-06 03:21:22 PM
Unfortunately, the data turned inside out. And exploded

Well, they've only done this once before.

/Safety not guaranteed.
 
2012-09-06 03:21:37 PM

Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 799x342]

[i291.photobucket.com image 320x320]

The sounds those things made scarred me for LIFE!


Of course the most disturbing part is the question of what happens from your point of view when you get transported. You'd think that from your POV, you die instantly as you are torn apart on a atomic level and that the person that is reconstituted on the other end only think they are you because they have all of your memories. There'd just be no way to know what happens from a person's perspective.
 
2012-09-06 03:22:07 PM
Just an FYI-
 
2012-09-06 03:22:15 PM
Sweet. the long, hard road of getting groped by a TSA agent before beaming to grandma's in a few milliseconds is upon us!
 
2012-09-06 03:24:03 PM
About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.
 
2012-09-06 03:27:39 PM
This episode was badly written!
 
2012-09-06 03:29:55 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: We sure are getting good at this whole information thing. But we still fly turbofans on aluminum alloy airplanes.


Hey, NASA almost got a scramjet working not too long ago.
 
2012-09-06 03:30:37 PM

Cybernetic: Unfortunately, the data turned inside out. And exploded

Well, they've only done this once before.

/Safety not guaranteed.


vaneeesab.files.wordpress.com

"Have you ever faced certain death?"

"If it was so certain, I wouldn't be here, would I?"
 
2012-09-06 03:30:38 PM
so the unit of measurement is 9Tof porn=5 minutes ?
 
2012-09-06 03:30:49 PM

CheetahOlivetti: I love this thread already.


What posts did make it through didn't last long
 
2012-09-06 03:30:58 PM

Mad_Radhu: Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 799x342]

[i291.photobucket.com image 320x320]

The sounds those things made scarred me for LIFE!

Of course the most disturbing part is the question of what happens from your point of view when you get transported. You'd think that from your POV, you die instantly as you are torn apart on a atomic level and that the person that is reconstituted on the other end only think they are you because they have all of your memories. There'd just be no way to know what happens from a person's perspective.


Hey, the equations must balance. Them's the rules.
 
2012-09-06 03:31:34 PM

liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.


If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.
 
2012-09-06 03:32:39 PM
Scientists from the Institute for Quantum Computing were a part of this! In fact, the lab of the researcher involved is right across from my office.

http://iqc.uwaterloo.ca/news-events/archive/quantum-teleportation-goe s -the-distance
 
2012-09-06 03:33:04 PM
What I found as a "well then what's the point" is FTFA:
"In an active feed-forward protocol, conventional data is sent alongside the quantum information, enabling the recipient to decipher the transferred signal with a higher efficiency."

Does that mean there's also a standard type of transmission in parallel? If so, then why bother with the quantum action at a distance for the transmission.?
 
2012-09-06 03:34:01 PM

Felgraf: liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.

If I recall correctly, quantum teleportation is still limited by c.

The problem with the ansible is that (if I'm remembering my quantum right: It's been 2 years since graduate quantum), when you entangle to particles-measuring one causes the *wave function* of the other to collapse: but you cannot control *how* it does so. (That is, I can measure an entangled particle and go "aha! This one has momentum X.. sot he other must have momentum -X, and its wave function has now collapsed! But I cannot go "I will ADD momentum X to my particle, causing the other to have momentum -X!")

Now, you might go "Wait! But if we can choose to collapse some wave functions, but not others, we could still use that as the basis for sending ones and zeroes!"
But, again, that doesn't quite work: because (again, I'm pretty sure I'm remembering this right), you cannot measure to see if the waveform has collapsed yet. . I *think*. I definately recall a lecture explaining why the ansible couldn't work, but I admit I may be getting the details a bit wrong. =/.


A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?
 
2012-09-06 03:36:38 PM
capital punishment potential?
 
2012-09-06 03:36:49 PM

Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 799x342]

[i291.photobucket.com image 320x320]

The sounds those things made scarred me for LIFE!


I know, right? That noise and the noise the creature in Forbidden Planet gives me the willies
 
2012-09-06 03:37:28 PM
Sadly yeah, teleportation is almost certainly completely impossible. To reconstitute a brain you would have to reconstitute not only the cells but electrical charges and stuff. I hate to say never but it's never going to happen. You could jump through a wormhole or pop into hyperspace, of course. Much easier than true teleportation.
 
2012-09-06 03:37:54 PM

HST's Dead Carcass: So, I don't have to worry about rush hour anymore?

/should probably RTFA


Wouldn't matter. It's one of those weird articles that makes no sense even when you read it twice.
 
2012-09-06 03:38:24 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Quantum Apostrophe: We sure are getting good at this whole information thing. But we still fly turbofans on aluminum alloy airplanes.

Hey, NASA almost got a scramjet working not too long ago.


Oh Jesus, the same scramjets we've had working for decades? Experimentally? Where they blow up or malfunction after a few minutes because of limits of materials and engineering?

And we don't even have Concorde anymore, but we'll have magical scramjets? Right?

Carousel Beast: Isn't this where you remind us that nothing useful ever came out of space exploration or technology? Because they seem to be going down that path.


Interesting twisted logic. Are you telling me the scientists did this research so people could live on the Moon?

Seems to me it's the usual "we find something here first, then apply it to space later" thing. Just like with everything else related to space...

And how is putting a satellite in orbit, where we already have shiat tons of satellites, "exploring"? Isn't that exploring done since decades? We're just using LEO and GEO to bounce signals around.

...and ???? Does this lead to manned space colonies? Hmmm? Does it?

This isn't a new material, it isn't a new energy source.

It's signal processing. The only thing that we've improved by orders and orders of magnitude since WWII.

Carousel Beast: And we don't live 1,000 years, either.


If that's your argument, I can say "we don't live on Mars either", right?

Except I have that whole physics thing on my side.

You don't.

So sorry.

thesmatter.files.wordpress.com

Now I'm going kayaking, biking, walking and all the things you won't be able to do in space...
 
2012-09-06 03:39:43 PM

Somaticasual: A serious question for more quantumly-inclined farkers: Wouldn't heisenberg's uncertainty principle basically prevent the disassembly and reassembly concept of teleportation? Either that, or you're reassembling someone who's going to be immediately at absolute zero (from a lack of molecular movement, because if you can find the position you can't find the momentum, therefore everything assembles at zero motion)?


What if you wore a sweater?
 
2012-09-06 03:43:28 PM
Star Trek didn't invent teleportertation as a way to "wow" us with future as much as a cost-cutting and screentime-saving measure.

Bringing shuttlecraft prop to a set, or worse yet on-site, is expensive and logistically troublesome.

In film, this is the "establishing shot" to tell the audience "OK, now we're on that planet we were talking about". If they just jumped to them walking around on the planet, the transition is too awkward and B-movie-ish.

And when you're using a soundstage, people expect the shuttlecraft to be shown in a DIFFERENT establishing shot of a landing area. That's expensive because a soundstage is a small place and only has a few angles it can work in, and it's only one location. It'll be awkward to step out of the shuttlecraft prop, walk 5 feet, and say "here are the incredibly rare crystals we were looking for, Captain... we're in luck, as always."

Thus the transporter was born. 2 seconds of stock effect and we've completed a theatrical transition.
 
2012-09-06 03:43:35 PM

Jument: Sadly yeah, teleportation is almost certainly completely impossible. To reconstitute a brain you would have to reconstitute not only the cells but electrical charges and stuff. I hate to say never but it's never going to happen. You could jump through a wormhole or pop into hyperspace, of course. Much easier than true teleportation.


At the very least it could be used for non-living material. Would make supplying the ISS much easier if they didn't have to send a shuttle up every time. Could also have great application in sending disaster relief supplies.

And of course, the most useful purpose, being able to buy alcohol when all the stores have closed up.
 
2012-09-06 03:44:35 PM
The RIAA is already claiming this has cost them $2 billion.
 
2012-09-06 03:44:42 PM
An important step towards instantaneous Sacher torte shipping.
 
2012-09-06 03:45:40 PM
take me apart, take me apart
what a way to roam
but if you have to take me apart to get me there
I'd rather stay at home
 
2012-09-06 03:45:58 PM

liam76: About time they got cracking on that ansible thing.


Came for the Ender's Game reference, leaving satisfied

/future planetary/lunar rovers communicating with Earth instantly will be cool
 
2012-09-06 03:46:28 PM

Funzo: The RIAA is already claiming this has cost them $2 billion.


...and Apple is gearing up to sue over the patents
 
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