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(Phys Org2)   "Proteins barge in to turn off unneeded genes." At least, that's your mom's excuse   (phys.org) divider line 8
    More: Obvious, proteins, cell walls, toxic metal, electric charges, genes, chemical biologies, National Academy of Sciences, fluorescents  
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723 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Sep 2012 at 11:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-06 11:43:53 AM
Biology 201, Farker Edition?
 
2012-09-06 11:47:33 AM
My eyeballs hurt.
 
2012-09-06 11:55:07 AM
So, they can legitimately turn those genes off?
 
2012-09-06 12:48:14 PM
Do they cause the tubes to shut down?
 
2012-09-06 08:54:04 PM
Can someone who speaks geek explain this to me? Cause I took this as "Eat lots of protein to protect against genetic abnormalities." Am I incorrect in this assessment?
 
2012-09-06 09:59:26 PM
Here's my interpretation, but ianas.

The gene they're studying causes the bacteria to produce an enzyme that bonds to copper (which is toxic to the bacteria), which is then pushed out through the cell wall. The bacteria has a protein attached to its dna that blocks the gene that produces the enzyme, and when that protein is exposed to copper, it changes in a way that allows the gene to function. When the copper has been purged from the cell, another protein replaces the one that was controlling the gene, and the cell goes back to normal.
 
2012-09-07 09:03:03 AM

Arumat: Here's my interpretation, but ianas.

The gene they're studying causes the bacteria to produce an enzyme that bonds to copper (which is toxic to the bacteria), which is then pushed out through the cell wall. The bacteria has a protein attached to its dna that blocks the gene that produces the enzyme, and when that protein is exposed to copper, it changes in a way that allows the gene to function. When the copper has been purged from the cell, another protein replaces the one that was controlling the gene, and the cell goes back to normal.


Copper? Follow me to City Scrap.
 
2012-09-07 10:07:26 AM
This is sweet news. The people not commenting just don`t see how important this is.
 
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