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(AZCentral)   Unable to find any lemonade stands to shut down, city officials in Phoenix order a woman to stop giving away bottles of water to thirsty people   (azcentral.com) divider line 16
    More: Asinine, Rutherford Institute, Arizona Attorney General, city managers  
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10309 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Sep 2012 at 11:23 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-05 04:05:59 AM
1 votes:
So we've got nanny state assholes making it illegal to give water to thirsty people (because you're depriving them of tax revenue and the water might be iocaine powder), and the water giver saying this violates her first amendment rights to proselytize.

Can I just hope everyone involved dies in a fire? Oh right - Phoenix, close enough.
2012-09-05 02:44:18 AM
1 votes:
How is giving away water a freedom of speech issue?!
2012-09-05 01:06:05 AM
1 votes:
Good thing she decided to wrap it all in religion, I haven't heard someone try and use that as an excuse to violate the law yet today, and it's getting awfully close to the end of the day.

Just comply with the law lady, those aren't there to make your life horrible, no matter what the unwashed masses of the internet tell you. For one, they're there to give people a way to track you if you're handing out a tainted product, as somebody else mention upthread.
2012-09-05 12:58:37 AM
1 votes:
It is illegal to not give away free water if someone asks, in Az.

That's what I was told in Arizona as well. I visited this summer and was in a store and the store owner suddenly asked if I wanted some water and when I said how nice that was of her to offer, she said that actually she carries a whole frig of bottled water in the back room because it is illegal to not give water to a person who asks. She gave our whole group water bottles. We were already buying something from her, so I don't think she lost anything from it and we were happy because it was already a hot day and the water was nice and cold.

Apparently, in the desert, there was a concern that people could die from the heat if there wasn't a law to keep people from hoarding water from others.

How does this impact this case? I don't know. I DNRTFA. 

/first slashie from a long-time lurker who is just starting to comment (finally got a login)
//be gentle
///this is fun; I usually just comment out loud to whoever is around about what I am reading
2012-09-05 12:24:31 AM
1 votes:

Jim_Callahan: optikeye: alienated: City ordinances, how do they work again ? i am not saying i agree with it, but hey- change the law then...

You overlooked a detail there. " giving away goods, wares, or merchandise or food from either a mobile vending unit or a mobile food vending unit."

It doesn't look like it was as "vending unit" IMHO, as "vending" usually means there's some exchange of money.

No, vending just means you've got a bunch of product on-hand and are distributing it. A big ice chest full of water bottles would, in fact, be a vending unit if it's being used to distribute said water.

I would also venture that the basic ordinance is more a traffic issue than anything else. Some dude handing out free shiat from a cart disrupts foot traffic just as much as some dude selling shiat from a cart, it actually makes sense for them to chip in for the cost of ameliorating said traffic disruption. All of the other people doing it are fine with supporting the various cops, crossing guards, etc that have to put in overtime for the event, no reason this woman should be special.

And, all that said, they gave her a warning, explained the situation to her, and asked her to show some consideration for the city and people around her in general, then expected her to act like, you know, a goddamned adult and comply. They didn't charge her with anything, fine her, or do anything other than politely explain the area of law that she may have missed. She, and this organization, are the ones being farkers about this, the city seems to be perfectly willing to grant her the permit if she plays by the rules like literally everyone else involved in the event.

//As for the freedom of speech/religion issue, did she apply for the permit on being informed it was necessary and get rejected? No? Then there's no discrimination or regulation of speech involved and she should fark off.
//I have little patience for people that can't perform the basic duties of citizenship like getting permits for distributing shiat on the street. If they're aware but don't have the money or whatever that's difference, but this sort of willful unwillingness to abide by the damned social contract just because someone feels they're a special snowflake is more than irresponsible enough to piss me off.


You, sir, are part of the problem.
2012-09-05 12:15:16 AM
1 votes:

FARTNOISE FARTNOISE JUNIOR: silverjets: Yeah yeah. Everyone's up in arms that Big Government stopped this lady from handing out bottles of water. What if no one stopped her and the bottles of water she was handing out were laced with something that made a bunch of people sick? Everyone would be mad at the police and government for not stopping her.

Or at least not being able to track her down through a permit after the fact.

I once bought a grilled cheese sandwich laced with LSD at a Phish concert. Wish that microbus had a permit I could use to track them down.


There are two things here that make me believe you have no sense of self preservation.
2012-09-05 12:04:01 AM
1 votes:
Florida tag - check
Arizona tag - overdue
2012-09-05 12:03:58 AM
1 votes:
Lemonade was a popular drink and it still is.
2012-09-04 11:59:00 PM
1 votes:

optikeye: alienated: City ordinances, how do they work again ? i am not saying i agree with it, but hey- change the law then...

You overlooked a detail there. " giving away goods, wares, or merchandise or food from either a mobile vending unit or a mobile food vending unit."

It doesn't look like it was as "vending unit" IMHO, as "vending" usually means there's some exchange of money.


No, vending just means you've got a bunch of product on-hand and are distributing it. A big ice chest full of water bottles would, in fact, be a vending unit if it's being used to distribute said water.

I would also venture that the basic ordinance is more a traffic issue than anything else. Some dude handing out free shiat from a cart disrupts foot traffic just as much as some dude selling shiat from a cart, it actually makes sense for them to chip in for the cost of ameliorating said traffic disruption. All of the other people doing it are fine with supporting the various cops, crossing guards, etc that have to put in overtime for the event, no reason this woman should be special.

And, all that said, they gave her a warning, explained the situation to her, and asked her to show some consideration for the city and people around her in general, then expected her to act like, you know, a goddamned adult and comply. They didn't charge her with anything, fine her, or do anything other than politely explain the area of law that she may have missed. She, and this organization, are the ones being farkers about this, the city seems to be perfectly willing to grant her the permit if she plays by the rules like literally everyone else involved in the event.

//As for the freedom of speech/religion issue, did she apply for the permit on being informed it was necessary and get rejected? No? Then there's no discrimination or regulation of speech involved and she should fark off.
//I have little patience for people that can't perform the basic duties of citizenship like getting permits for distributing shiat on the street. If they're aware but don't have the money or whatever that's difference, but this sort of willful unwillingness to abide by the damned social contract just because someone feels they're a special snowflake is more than irresponsible enough to piss me off.
2012-09-04 11:56:55 PM
1 votes:

siyuntz: How hard is it to obtain a permit? Does it cost a lot? Because I'd at least want her name and DL# written down somewhere just in case she was giving out Jonestown Kool-Aid instead of water. Though, I probably wouldn't ingest something given to me by a religious nutjob stranger, anyway, so there's that.

/Go away, poor persecuted Christian


I wonder how many farkers went into that story expecting to be outraged at the city, then saw it was a christian and their anti-christian hate made them do a 180 and find ways to support the city for actions they had just found reprehensible 2 seconds earlier.
2012-09-04 11:26:48 PM
1 votes:
If I read TFA correctly she could have moved onto public property (ie. sidewalk) and been ok. Asinine is right.
2012-09-04 11:24:46 PM
1 votes:
images1.wikia.nocookie.net
2012-09-04 10:09:23 PM
1 votes:
How hard is it to obtain a permit? Does it cost a lot? Because I'd at least want her name and DL# written down somewhere just in case she was giving out Jonestown Kool-Aid instead of water. Though, I probably wouldn't ingest something given to me by a religious nutjob stranger, anyway, so there's that.

/Go away, poor persecuted Christian
2012-09-04 09:29:21 PM
1 votes:
Whatever happened to common sense?

Look the other way, dickhead city official who barred this woman. What a jerk you are.
2012-09-04 08:51:08 PM
1 votes:

optikeye: alienated: City ordinances, how do they work again ? i am not saying i agree with it, but hey- change the law then...

You overlooked a detail there. " giving away goods, wares, or merchandise or food from either a mobile vending unit or a mobile food vending unit."

It doesn't look like it was as "vending unit" IMHO, as "vending" usually means there's some exchange of money.


Vend:

transitive verb
1
a : to sell especially as a hawker or peddler
b : to sell by means of vending machines

Latin vendere to sell, v.t., contraction for venum dare to give for sale
2012-09-04 06:22:06 PM
1 votes:
A city memo about the incident said Crow-Smith was violating the "mobile vendor" ordinance, which requires a vendor operating on private property to obtain a city permit for "vending, selling, serving, displaying, offering for sale or giving away goods, wares, or merchandise or food from either a mobile vending unit or a mobile food vending unit."


Rutherford Institute attorney Doug Drury wrote a letter to Phoenix officials on Aug. 9, saying Crow-Smith's water giveaway was legal since she was giving passers-by water, not selling it. "Ms. Crow-Smith's conduct was a manifestation of her sincerely held religious beliefs," he added.

City ordinances, how do they work again ? i am not saying i agree with it, but hey- change the law then...
 
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