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(MacRumors)   Hackers release 12,367,232 Apple iOS UDIDs - complete with names, phone numbers and other personal info - that they got from the FBI in March   (macrumors.com) divider line 89
    More: Scary, iOS UDIDs, iOS, FBI, iOS devices, phone numbers, laptops  
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6596 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Sep 2012 at 7:26 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-04 05:42:44 AM
During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by Supervisor...

I think I found the source of the leak.
 
2012-09-04 07:31:28 AM

Friskya: During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by Supervisor...

I think I found the source of the leak.


I'm surprised the Government hasn't started using some personalized flavor of Linux yet. That said, why the hell is Apple using unique identifiers like this?
 
2012-09-04 07:36:59 AM

Friskya: During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by Supervisor...

I think I found the source of the leak.


"was breached using the AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability on Java"

I think I've found the real issue here.
 
2012-09-04 07:41:41 AM

Guntram Shatterhand: Friskya: During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by Supervisor...

I think I found the source of the leak.

I'm surprised the Government hasn't started using some personalized flavor of Linux yet. That said, why the hell is Apple using unique identifiers like this?


You're both barking up the wrong tree:

Why does some middling FBI supervisor-and therefore the FBI itself-have a list of over 12 million sets of personal information?

During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by
Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action
Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team was breached using the
AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability on Java, during the shell session some files
were downloaded from his Desktop folder one of them with the name of
"NCFTA_iOS_devices_intel.csv" turned to be a list of 12,367,232 Apple iOS
devices including Unique Device Identifiers (UDID), user names, name of device,
type of device, Apple Push Notification Service tokens, zipcodes, cellphone
numbers, addresses, etc.
the personal details fields referring to people
appears many times empty leaving the whole list incompleted on many parts. no
other file on the same folder makes mention about this list or its purpose.
 
2012-09-04 07:45:04 AM

bersl2:
*snip*

You're both barking up the wrong tree:

Why does some middling FBI supervisor-and therefore the FBI itself-have a list of over 12 million sets of personal information?


This right here.
 
2012-09-04 07:53:03 AM
bersl2:
"Why does some middling FBI supervisor-and therefore the FBI itself-have a list of over 12 million sets of personal information?"

"Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team"

Sounds like he supervises the offices (regional anyways) that would have the most use for them.

Who do you think would need/have them?
 
2012-09-04 07:54:53 AM

Unlikable: bersl2:
"Why does some middling FBI supervisor-and therefore the FBI itself-have a list of over 12 million sets of personal information?"

"Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team"

Sounds like he supervises the offices (regional anyways) that would have the most use for them.

Who do you think would need/have them?


That doesn't answer why he has them. 12 million ID's sounds like an awfully large net for any kind of investigation.
 
2012-09-04 07:55:56 AM
Really, that 12 million is just the tip of the iceberg you can be sure they have all the rest. The FBI and other governments around the world collect just about everything they can especially from phones. Every SMS message you've ever sent is kept. Supposed to delete them after around 6 years but think again. Call histories, probably Echelon phone recordings if you said a certain flagged word.

/doesn't have a cell phone
 
2012-09-04 08:05:19 AM
Why does APPLE need all that stuff? Some of it makes sense.. the rest like user name, zipcode, phone number and address is none their farking business.
 
2012-09-04 08:09:15 AM

swaxhog: if you said a certain flagged word.


I'd be disappointed if at least half of my fark posts are not flagged because of key word use.
You must be on drugs if you think the FBI doesn't watch the internet like al qaeda watching for easy targets to bomb.

/sorry off my game today
//waves hi to the nice government employee
 
2012-09-04 08:11:55 AM

swaxhog: Really, that 12 million is just the tip of the iceberg you can be sure they have all the rest. The FBI and other governments around the world collect just about everything they can especially from phones. Every SMS message you've ever sent is kept. Supposed to delete them after around 6 years but think again. Call histories, probably Echelon phone recordings if you said a certain flagged word.

/doesn't have a cell phone


Even if the government collected every bit of that information tenfold over it never has and NEVER will affect you or anyone you will ever know in anyway whatsoever. There's 350 million Americans, nobody cares who you are.
 
2012-09-04 08:12:58 AM

Friskya: During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by Supervisor...

I think I found the source of the leak.


Fixed that for you..
 
2012-09-04 08:14:38 AM

bersl2: Guntram Shatterhand: Friskya: During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by Supervisor...

I think I found the source of the leak.

I'm surprised the Government hasn't started using some personalized flavor of Linux yet. That said, why the hell is Apple using unique identifiers like this?

You're both barking up the wrong tree:

Why does some middling FBI supervisor-and therefore the FBI itself-have a list of over 12 million sets of personal information?

During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by
Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action
Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team was breached using the
AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability on Java, during the shell session some files
were downloaded from his Desktop folder one of them with the name of
"NCFTA_iOS_devices_intel.csv" turned to be a list of 12,367,232 Apple iOS
devices including Unique Device Identifiers (UDID), user names, name of device,
type of device, Apple Push Notification Service tokens, zipcodes, cellphone
numbers, addresses, etc. the personal details fields referring to people
appears many times empty leaving the whole list incompleted on many parts. no
other file on the same folder makes mention about this list or its purpose.


You're focusin' on the wrong part of the story!
 
2012-09-04 08:17:59 AM

Bob Down: Why does APPLE need all that stuff? Some of it makes sense.. the rest like user name, zipcode, phone number and address is none their farking business.


Maybe billing in iTunes? Not that it justifies it but if you REALLY want to get weirded out about this sort of thing you really need to think about what Google knows about you.

The UUIDs are to identify the actual device. Nothing freaky about that at all, it's used to know what machine is what, development build provisioning, etc.
 
2012-09-04 08:23:20 AM

sirgarr02: swaxhog: Really, that 12 million is just the tip of the iceberg you can be sure they have all the rest. The FBI and other governments around the world collect just about everything they can especially from phones. Every SMS message you've ever sent is kept. Supposed to delete them after around 6 years but think again. Call histories, probably Echelon phone recordings if you said a certain flagged word.

/doesn't have a cell phone

Even if the government collected every bit of that information tenfold over it never has and NEVER will affect you or anyone you will ever know in anyway whatsoever. There's 350 million Americans, nobody cares who you are.


In fact, the more information they collect, the better. The more they know about everybody, the less they know about anybody.
 
2012-09-04 08:27:55 AM

Bob Down: Why does APPLE need all that stuff? Some of it makes sense.. the rest like user name, zipcode, phone number and address is none their farking business.


because apple does their own billing with itunes and the account is tied to devices.
 
2012-09-04 08:33:15 AM

Bob Down: Why does APPLE need all that stuff? Some of it makes sense.. the rest like user name, zipcode, phone number and address is none their farking business.


Unless you want to log into iTunes (username) and buy a song with a credit card (zipcode, phone number and address), besides that, Apple doesn't need it.


Why did the FBI have it? The article doesn't say.
 
2012-09-04 08:45:04 AM

jso2897:

In fact, the more information they collect, the better. The more they know about everybody, the less they know about anybody.


Until your name mistakenly matched for the bio-terrorists that fund their operations through drug fueled child porn rings. Then they swoop down on your house with a no-knock warrant, shoot your dog, kick your wife in the head and take you into custody. After 3 days of interrogation and ransacking your house, they realize that the terrorist must have been using a cloned ID tag on their iPad. So they tell you sorry and send you on your way.

Now you need to explain you boss why you missing for three days without calling, why the FBI showed up and demaned they see all your mail records and rifled through your desk and your neighbors read the account in the paper that you were arrested for running a child porn ring.

So, yeah, its a great idea. Think of all the funny stories you'll be able to tell at parties!
 
2012-09-04 08:56:39 AM

bersl2: Why does some middling FBI supervisor-and therefore the FBI itself-have a list of over 12 million sets of personal information?


suzieqq.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-09-04 08:59:24 AM

sirgarr02: Even if the government collected every bit of that information tenfold over it never has and NEVER will affect you or anyone you will ever know in anyway whatsoever. There's 350 million Americans, nobody cares who you are.


Obviously, you have never attempted to fight corruption or unjust policies, and with that attitude, you probably never will. Pre-emptive surveillance makes harassing such people all the more efficient and effective.

They may not care now, but if you ever do give them a reason to care, whether legitimate or not, with this kind of dragnet spying, it's so much more easy for them to take action, for better and for worse. And the inability to seek redress of grievances without the specter of turn-key threats against your person, your family, your associates, and your property further ossifies the current state of affairs. Good luck getting anything changed in government.
 
2012-09-04 09:04:39 AM

bersl2: sirgarr02: Even if the government collected every bit of that information tenfold over it never has and NEVER will affect you or anyone you will ever know in anyway whatsoever. There's 350 million Americans, nobody cares who you are.

Obviously, you have never attempted to fight corruption or unjust policies, and with that attitude, you probably never will. Pre-emptive surveillance makes harassing such people all the more efficient and effective.

They may not care now, but if you ever do give them a reason to care, whether legitimate or not, with this kind of dragnet spying, it's so much more easy for them to take action, for better and for worse. And the inability to seek redress of grievances without the specter of turn-key threats against your person, your family, your associates, and your property further ossifies the current state of affairs. Good luck getting anything changed in government.


You do realize that horse left the barn, waltzed out the pasture and is doing a world tour 3 continents away now right? Closing the door is immaterial at this stage of the game.
 
2012-09-04 09:04:55 AM

bersl2: You're both barking up the wrong tree:

Why does some middling FBI supervisor-and therefore the FBI itself-have a list of over 12 million sets of personal information?


The fact this needed to be said gives me a sad. It reminds me of the threads from months ago where employers were exposed for requiring FB logins from job applicants... And (way too many) farkers were blaming FB for it.
 
2012-09-04 09:05:13 AM
If this happened under President Bush the uproar would be tremendous...but since President Obama is in office.....*crickets*...
 
2012-09-04 09:06:51 AM
Isn't there a place on the 1040EZ form for Apple UDID?
 
2012-09-04 09:08:05 AM

Guntram Shatterhand: That said, why the hell is Apple using unique identifiers like this?


Why would you think they aren't? I don't suppose I've used a computing device without a software-accessible unique identifier (ethernet/WiFi MAC address at least) since around 1994.
 
2012-09-04 09:11:10 AM

xaldin: You do realize that horse left the barn, waltzed out the pasture and is doing a world tour 3 continents away now right? Closing the door is immaterial at this stage of the game.


Yes, I do. Not everybody even realizes that there's a problem to begin with, though. If they don't understand the consequences of the door having been left open in the first place, how are they supposed to understand that's it's too late to just close it?
 
2012-09-04 09:25:16 AM

wingnut396: Until your name mistakenly matched for the bio-terrorists that fund their operations through drug fueled child porn rings. Then they swoop down on your house with a no-knock warrant, shoot your dog, kick your wife in the head and take you into custody. After 3 days of interrogation and ransacking your house, they realize that the terrorist must have been using a cloned ID tag on their iPad. So they tell you sorry and send you on your way.


You're crazy.

No way they'd apologize.
 
2012-09-04 09:27:25 AM
If you are innocent, you have nothing to fear.
 
2012-09-04 09:51:09 AM
I'm more upset that Apple (which is presumably the only source for that information) gave it over to the FBI even with a warrant. There is no such thing as an evidence search warrant that is broad enough to possibly cover (and need) 12 Million customer files. Warrants must be specific and limited to the necessary purpose of the investigation and it is up to the court that issues them to ensure that, and it is ALSO up to the target of the warrant to object and protest if it is overly broad. Apple has lawyers - I'm appalled that they appear not to have used their significant resources to object to whatever request it was that asked for 12 Million customer files.
 
2012-09-04 09:53:21 AM
Oh no UDIDn't.
 
2012-09-04 09:58:06 AM

AndreMA: wingnut396: Until your name mistakenly matched for the bio-terrorists that fund their operations through drug fueled child porn rings. Then they swoop down on your house with a no-knock warrant, shoot your dog, kick your wife in the head and take you into custody. After 3 days of interrogation and ransacking your house, they realize that the terrorist must have been using a cloned ID tag on their iPad. So they tell you sorry and send you on your way.

You're crazy.

No way they'd apologize.


That would imply fault which is an avenue for legal action. No way. Everything they do is right because they do it and everything you do is wrong because you do it.

bersl2: xaldin: You do realize that horse left the barn, waltzed out the pasture and is doing a world tour 3 continents away now right? Closing the door is immaterial at this stage of the game.

Yes, I do. Not everybody even realizes that there's a problem to begin with, though. If they don't understand the consequences of the door having been left open in the first place, how are they supposed to understand that's it's too late to just close it?


If you are not angry about the current global and internal political situation you simply are not paying attention.
 
2012-09-04 09:59:46 AM

jso2897:
In fact, the more information they collect, the better. The more they know about everybody, the less they know about anybody.


Not so much actually. It used to be that this was true when dealing with paper records they were exceptionally labour intensive worse if they were hand written. Collecting too much data would slow the humans down as they wade through it. Not so much with a computer, it can and will process millions of records an hour given enough grunt (which is a factor of 'how much you want to spend?' these days rather than any MIPS per chunk of silicon limit).

In fact as the computer can't make leaps of faith/get a feeling in its gut the ideal situation is to feed it more data so it has a more 'complete picture' (i.e. more data points to compare) and of course unlike the human... the machine never sleeps, don't go for a piss nor break for lunch.

This is made simpler due to everyone else using computers and SQL driven backends so pulling data off in a nice transferable format like CSV is exceptionally easy and can be done with just a flash of the right paperwork.

And it's not like you'd need a 'super special' bit of silicon either, to a computer there is no functional difference between your medical records or your cell phone bill.

Not trying to seem like a tin foil hat crazy (although it does fit quite nicely) just pointing out that what made this stuff balls out difficult for humans is a machines bread & butter.
 
2012-09-04 10:01:43 AM

sirgarr02: swaxhog: Really, that 12 million is just the tip of the iceberg you can be sure they have all the rest. The FBI and other governments around the world collect just about everything they can especially from phones. Every SMS message you've ever sent is kept. Supposed to delete them after around 6 years but think again. Call histories, probably Echelon phone recordings if you said a certain flagged word.

/doesn't have a cell phone

Even if the government collected every bit of that information tenfold over it never has and NEVER will affect you or anyone you will ever know in anyway whatsoever. There's 350 million Americans, nobody cares who you are.


42 million people would like a word with you
 
2012-09-04 10:03:15 AM

mcreadyblue: If you are innocent, you have nothing to fear.


If you are afraid, you are guilty.
 
2012-09-04 10:04:11 AM

cefm: I'm more upset that Apple (which is presumably the only source for that information) gave it over to the FBI even with a warrant. There is no such thing as an evidence search warrant that is broad enough to possibly cover (and need) 12 Million customer files. Warrants must be specific and limited to the necessary purpose of the investigation and it is up to the court that issues them to ensure that, and it is ALSO up to the target of the warrant to object and protest if it is overly broad. Apple has lawyers - I'm appalled that they appear not to have used their significant resources to object to whatever request it was that asked for 12 Million customer files.


I wonder if the lawyers even knew about it. If they didn't, it wouldn't surprise me that the FBI asked for them while an agent was at a lunch meeting with the COO. Pick up the lunch tab for data. 

/That part about everything except the lawyers knowing about it is not a real story, AFAIK.
 
2012-09-04 10:12:35 AM

Bob Down: Why does APPLE need all that stuff? Some of it makes sense.. the rest like user name, zipcode, phone number and address is none their farking business.


Bigger question: Why does the FBI need 12 million iOS UDID's? Are there REALLY 12 million 'people of interest' in the United States that have an iOS device? REALLY?

Smaller question: Did this come from Apple directly or the 'black room' in AT&T?
 
2012-09-04 10:12:43 AM

HotWingConspiracy: That doesn't answer why he has them. 12 million ID's sounds like an awfully large net for any kind of investigation

 
2012-09-04 10:13:40 AM

Giltric: HotWingConspiracy: That doesn't answer why he has them. 12 million ID's sounds like an awfully large net for any kind of investigation


hmmm missed the link first time around.


Link
 
2012-09-04 10:16:07 AM

cefm: I'm more upset that Apple (which is presumably the only source for that information) gave it over to the FBI even with a warrant. There is no such thing as an evidence search warrant that is broad enough to possibly cover (and need) 12 Million customer files. Warrants must be specific and limited to the necessary purpose of the investigation and it is up to the court that issues them to ensure that, and it is ALSO up to the target of the warrant to object and protest if it is overly broad. Apple has lawyers - I'm appalled that they appear not to have used their significant resources to object to whatever request it was that asked for 12 Million customer files.


It's more likely the FBI collected the information using some popular app in the App Store. Until about a year ago, apps could collect the UDID of the device. Apple has since put the kibosh on this.
 
2012-09-04 10:17:19 AM

Guntram Shatterhand: Friskya: During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by Supervisor...

I think I found the source of the leak.

I'm surprised the Government hasn't started using some personalized flavor of Linux yet. That said, why the hell is Apple using unique identifiers like this?


NSA developed its own distro years ago (which you can actually get yourself, if you want to). As for Apple, I have to assume it's got something to do with their famously sterling usability. The more the box does for you, the less you have to do yourself, and that's going to feel good to a lot of people who don't want to learn how their toys work. I suppose it feels more personal and special, all part of the infantilising catholicism Apple is (in)famous for.
 
2012-09-04 10:22:27 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: and that's going to feel good to a lot of people who don't want to learn how their toys work.


Or people who spend all day fixing the sodding things and just want their machine at home to a) work b) look good c) someone else to fix it.

I/We might enjoy tinkering and general geekery but well... I spent all damn day fixing computers... screw it.
 
2012-09-04 10:28:02 AM

Scorpius.Raven: bersl2:
*snip*

You're both barking up the wrong tree:

Why does some middling FBI supervisor-and therefore the FBI itself-have a list of over 12 million sets of personal information?

This right here.


I think that's the real story, and probably the real reason for the hack and publish: to show that the FBI has all this information, so that we can ask why.

I *want* to say something like, "Media shiatstorm in 3.. 2.." but the sad reality is that Americans have gradually gotten used to these invasions, and by this point largely feel helpless trying to do anything about it.
 
2012-09-04 10:30:39 AM

Vaneshi: Bob Down: Why does APPLE need all that stuff? Some of it makes sense.. the rest like user name, zipcode, phone number and address is none their farking business.

Bigger question: Why does the FBI need 12 million iOS UDID's? Are there REALLY 12 million 'people of interest' in the United States that have an iOS device? REALLY?

Smaller question: Did this come from Apple directly or the 'black room' in AT&T?


If people paid attention to the world around them, they would know that Senators on the Senate Intelligence Committee have recently warned us that our current government has a secret interpretation of the Patriot Act that they feel entitles them to full access to all your personal records of any sort.

For more than two years, a handful of Democrats on the Senate intelligence committee have warned that the government is secretly interpreting its surveillance powers under the Patriot Act in a way that would be alarming if the public - or even others in Congress - knew about it.

The senators, who also said that Americans would be "stunned" to know what the government thought the Patriot Act allowed it to do, made their remarks in a letter to Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. after a Justice Department official last month told a judge that disclosing anything about the program "could be expected to cause exceptionally grave damage to the national security of the United States."

The dispute centers on what the government thinks it is allowed to do under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, under which agents may obtain a secret order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court allowing them to get access to any "tangible things" - like business records - that are deemed "relevant" to a terrorism or espionage investigation.


So the Government has already interpreted the Patriot Act to mean that it has access to all your telephone records (which include everything divulged here) in addition to all your banking records and anything else they would care to get a copy of.

Seriously, folks. Start paying attention to the word around you. Our Government has taken a bipartisan turn towards the dark side.

William Binney, a former official with the National Security Agency, recently said that domestic surveillance in the U.S. has increased under President Obama, and trillions of phone calls, emails and other messages sent by U.S. citizens have been intercepted by the government. In fact, in an interview with Democracy Now, the official-turned-whistleblower claims that the government currently possesses copies of almost all emails sent and received in the United States.

Binney, who is regarded as one of the best mathematicians and code breakers in NSA history, says he left the agency in late 2001 after he learned about its plan to use the September 11th terrorist attacks as an excuse to launch a controversial data collection program on its own citizens.


This isn't to keep us safe from those darned terrorists. The terrorists were the excuse they used to do something they've been wanting to do all along.
 
2012-09-04 10:34:51 AM

cfletch13: Oh no UDIDn't.


Spectacular.
 
2012-09-04 10:38:53 AM
So what can they do with this information?

Send you AdHoc development apps? Give you crank calls in the middle of the night?

What?
 
2012-09-04 10:40:34 AM

SVenus: Isn't there a place on the 1040EZ form for Apple UDID?


Yes, but since so many Apple users are tax-deductible dependents, it's not used much.
 
2012-09-04 10:41:17 AM
You Do realize tha the FBI makes apps for ios devices right and they probably mined the info like any other developer did.
 
2012-09-04 10:43:03 AM

BigBooper: swaxhog: if you said a certain flagged word.

I'd be disappointed if at least half of my fark posts are not flagged because of key word use.
You must be on drugs if you think the FBI doesn't watch the internet like al qaeda watching for easy targets to bomb.

/sorry off my game today
//waves hi to the nice government employee


I figure if the FBI is reading my posts which include ideas and observations for making terrorist more effective maybe they'll figure out how to minimize the issues I notice. If I see an obvious terrorist target or technique in passing then I bet the terrorist who obsess about such things already has it in his playbook.
 
2012-09-04 10:45:11 AM

mcreadyblue: If you are innocent, you have nothing to fear.


I know you're joking, and I appreciate it, but it's worth pointing out that 'innocent' can be subjective. I've committed jailable felonies in several states that I did and do not consider constitutionally criminal acts. I consider myself innocent, but courts of the time probably would not have, and I would have been largely powerless to defend myself against what I'd consider constitutionally invalid laws.
 
2012-09-04 10:49:54 AM
I'm sure if it goes to trial the SCOTUS will rule it constitution because of umm... something something something commerce clause.
 
2012-09-04 10:50:50 AM

Giltric: Giltric: HotWingConspiracy: That doesn't answer why he has them. 12 million ID's sounds like an awfully large net for any kind of investigation

hmmm missed the link first time around.


Link


Holy cats:

"Main Core contains personal and financial data of millions of U.S. citizens believed to be threats to national security. The data, which comes from the NSA, FBI, CIA, and other sources, is collected and stored without warrants or court orders. ... As of 2008 there are reportedly eight million Americans listed in the database as possible threats, often for trivial reasons, whom the government may choose to track, question, or detain in a time of crisis."

Deep in his grave, J. Edgar Hoovre is furiously beating off.
 
2012-09-04 10:55:56 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Giltric: Giltric: HotWingConspiracy: That doesn't answer why he has them. 12 million ID's sounds like an awfully large net for any kind of investigation

hmmm missed the link first time around.


Link

Holy cats:

"Main Core contains personal and financial data of millions of U.S. citizens believed to be threats to national security. The data, which comes from the NSA, FBI, CIA, and other sources, is collected and stored without warrants or court orders. ... As of 2008 there are reportedly eight million Americans listed in the database as possible threats, often for trivial reasons, whom the government may choose to track, question, or detain in a time of crisis."

Deep in his grave, J. Edgar Hoovre is furiously beating off.


Hoover. Ugh.
 
2012-09-04 10:56:14 AM

Carth: I'm sure if it goes to trial the SCOTUS will rule it constitution because of umm... something something something commerce clause.


My money is on "something something terrorists something something with us or against us" personally.
 
2012-09-04 10:58:40 AM

Vaneshi: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: and that's going to feel good to a lot of people who don't want to learn how their toys work.

Or people who spend all day fixing the sodding things and just want their machine at home to a) work b) look good c) someone else to fix it.

I/We might enjoy tinkering and general geekery but well... I spent all damn day fixing computers... screw it.


Granted, but that's not the point I'm making. My point is that Apple actively discourages and obscures their own users' knowledge of their own devices. You're not fooled, but many people are, and the purpose is to ensure customer loyalty by making users dependent on the provider.
 
2012-09-04 10:59:42 AM
You can check to see if your UDID was on the list here.

I checked my iPad 2 (wifi only) and iPhone 4. It didn't appear to be on the list. Full disclosure, formerly on AT&T, now on Straight Talk (AT&T prepaid MVNO).

Get you UDID using this guide.
 
2012-09-04 11:18:47 AM

jso2897: In fact, the more information they collect, the better. The more they know about everybody, the less they know about anybody.


Yeah...It's impossible to pour that info into a filterable/searchable database and create a dossier for every citizen in the country.
If you have someone's cell phone info and their financial data (and an info web like the government has deployed), it would be pretty easy to track them throughout the day.
Hell, your phone transmits GPS coordinates of where you are, and can even transmit voice and video when it is turned off....that's creepy.
 
2012-09-04 11:32:26 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch:
Deep in his grave, J. Edgar Hoovre is furiously beating off.


Whilst wearing a fetching twinset and pearls.
 
2012-09-04 11:35:53 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: SVenus: Isn't there a place on the 1040EZ form for Apple UDID?

Yes, but since so many Apple users are tax-deductible dependents, it's not used much.


i267.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-04 11:36:34 AM
your government cares about what you're doing:

cdn.mos.totalfilm.com
 
2012-09-04 11:38:42 AM
The camera is always on on your Apple device, you deviated perverts.
 
2012-09-04 11:39:22 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: and the purpose is to ensure customer loyalty by making users dependent on the provider.


Well yes but you can equally argue that Google does the exact same trick with Android. Sure you have a multitude of stores to select (a good thing IMHO) and you can install apk's yourself (another good thing IMHO).

But you can't transfer those purchases to an iOS device or vice versa (a bad thing IMHO), once you're in to any great degree on either platform it can be quite irksome and possibly expensive to go somewhere else.
 
2012-09-04 11:55:17 AM
Came to make an iOS IUD joke, leaving after realizing it was lame.
 
2012-09-04 11:55:35 AM

neversubmit: mcreadyblue: If you are innocent, you have nothing to fear.

If you are afraid, you are guilty.


Da, tovarisch. Report your brothers! Keep Amerika safe! You are all guilty until you prove that you are not!
 
2012-09-04 11:57:05 AM
I am gonna come out of my self imposed exile to say one thing....


Change we can believe in
 
2012-09-04 11:58:08 AM

Vaneshi: Sylvia_Bandersnatch:
Deep in his grave, J. Edgar Hoovre is furiously beating off.

Whilst wearing a fetching twinset and pearls.


Ha ha, because he was a cross-dresser. What are you, twelve?
 
2012-09-04 12:00:27 PM

Vaneshi: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: and the purpose is to ensure customer loyalty by making users dependent on the provider.

Well yes but you can equally argue that Google does the exact same trick with Android. Sure you have a multitude of stores to select (a good thing IMHO) and you can install apk's yourself (another good thing IMHO).

But you can't transfer those purchases to an iOS device or vice versa (a bad thing IMHO), once you're in to any great degree on either platform it can be quite irksome and possibly expensive to go somewhere else.


Could you try that again in *coherent* English, please? I'm about half getting it.

I'm also not defending Google. And the fact that anyone else might do anything simlar is entirely irrelevant to my point. If I punch someone, it's not okay or less wrong because someone else punched someone.
 
2012-09-04 12:01:33 PM

MightyPez: You can check to see if your UDID was on the list here.

I checked my iPad 2 (wifi only) and iPhone 4. It didn't appear to be on the list. Full disclosure, formerly on AT&T, now on Straight Talk (AT&T prepaid MVNO).

Get you UDID using this guide.


They only released part of the list (I'm paging through it now). However 12 million is still only 4% of all iDevices ever sold.
 
2012-09-04 12:04:57 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Granted, but that's not the point I'm making. My point is that Apple actively discourages and obscures their own users' knowledge of their own devices. You're not fooled, but many people are, and the purpose is to ensure customer loyalty by making users dependent on the provider.


LG actively discourages and obscures my knowledge of my own refrigerator so what is your point? People want their shiat to work when turned on and can care less how its delivered.
 
2012-09-04 12:05:33 PM
I imagine that a goodly number of the people impacted are in California.

Unfortunately Federal agencies don't seem to be covered under Cal. Civ. Code 1798.82 and 1798.29, although State agencies are. Perhaps the idiot with the laptop could be construed to be an individual conducting business in California?

Even if they were covered, they'd lie and claim that notification would impede a criminal investigation (how? the criminals already know they stole it).
 
2012-09-04 12:06:49 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Ha ha, because he was a cross-dresser.


And gay, allegedly. During a period of time when either of those would get you a nice, state and public approved beating from the police and the most meagre grain of proof of which would bar you from certain positions... like being the head of the FBI.

What are you, twelve?

Is it my fault your hero was an alleged closet homosexual with something to hide whilst simultaneously taking a hard line stance on 'subversives'... like gays and cross-dressers? No it is not my fault your hero was one of the largest hypocrites in recent history. Making insinuations about someones age simply because you dislike something they say makes you look retarded.
 
2012-09-04 12:09:43 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch:
Could you try that again in *coherent* English, please? I'm about half getting it.


Then I suggest you reread it or ask someone else to dumb it down further. That's as low brow as I'm prepared to go with you.
 
2012-09-04 12:24:16 PM
I'm guessing this is actually from a case being brought against a popular app maker who was stealing personal information. Either that or it's Install0us's database that was actually leaked.
 
2012-09-04 12:33:59 PM
Likely this is data from the ECHELON program - and an offshoot of the FBI's Carnivore.

/the truth is out there
//right next to all of your data
 
2012-09-04 12:38:35 PM

Lawnchair: Guntram Shatterhand: That said, why the hell is Apple using unique identifiers like this?

Why would you think they aren't? I don't suppose I've used a computing device without a software-accessible unique identifier (ethernet/WiFi MAC address at least) since around 1994.


Except on a PC all of these can be disabled. Intel processors have a UID but this is disabled by default on all machines. Ethernet/WiFI MAC addresses are NOTHING compared to this. Apple's UID allows them all sorts of information. Say you change your itunes password, well with the email and user name, with the UID they can reset ANYTHING. It's a horrible design, the fact that it's on by default is crazy.
 
2012-09-04 12:54:19 PM

Vaneshi: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: and the purpose is to ensure customer loyalty by making users dependent on the provider.

Well yes but you can equally argue that Google does the exact same trick with Android. Sure you have a multitude of stores to select (a good thing IMHO) and you can install apk's yourself (another good thing IMHO).

But you can't transfer those purchases to an iOS device or vice versa (a bad thing IMHO), once you're in to any great degree on either platform it can be quite irksome and possibly expensive to go somewhere else.


That isn't Android's choice. Google can't force Apple to honor purchases in the Android Market. I've seen you regurgitate this drivel multiple times on Fark. Stop blaming Google for Apple's idiocy.
 
2012-09-04 01:36:30 PM

wildcardjack: BigBooper: swaxhog: if you said a certain flagged word.

I'd be disappointed if at least half of my fark posts are not flagged because of key word use.
You must be on drugs if you think the FBI doesn't watch the internet like al qaeda watching for easy targets to bomb.

/sorry off my game today
//waves hi to the nice government employee

I figure if the FBI is reading my posts which include ideas and observations for making terrorist more effective maybe they'll figure out how to minimize the issues I notice. If I see an obvious terrorist target or technique in passing then I bet the terrorist who obsess about such things already has it in his playbook.


Plus the baddies seem to always be engineers.
 
2012-09-04 02:14:36 PM

StoPPeRmobile: Plus the baddies seem to always be engineers.


Then maybe we should stop pissing off engineers.
 
2012-09-04 03:30:30 PM

ferretman: If this happened under President Bush the uproar would be tremendous...but since President Obama is in office.....*crickets*...


It was happening under Bush, when the NSA ramped up it's citizen spying program. When anyone dared question this every Republican politician and pundit screamed "you support the terrorists!", "why do you hate the USA", and "anyone criticizing the President is a traitor".

History. Try reading and remembering it sometime.
 
2012-09-04 03:50:47 PM

phimuskapsi: Lawnchair: Guntram Shatterhand: That said, why the hell is Apple using unique identifiers like this?

Why would you think they aren't? I don't suppose I've used a computing device without a software-accessible unique identifier (ethernet/WiFi MAC address at least) since around 1994.

Except on a PC all of these can be disabled. Intel processors have a UID but this is disabled by default on all machines. Ethernet/WiFI MAC addresses are NOTHING compared to this. Apple's UID allows them all sorts of information. Say you change your itunes password, well with the email and user name, with the UID they can reset ANYTHING. It's a horrible design, the fact that it's on by default is crazy.


You do realize that every Android Phone, Windows Phone, and Blackberry also has a UUID, don't you?
 
2012-09-04 05:34:44 PM
UDID what?
 
2012-09-04 05:58:06 PM

BullBearMS: phimuskapsi: Lawnchair: Guntram Shatterhand: That said, why the hell is Apple using unique identifiers like this?

Why would you think they aren't? I don't suppose I've used a computing device without a software-accessible unique identifier (ethernet/WiFi MAC address at least) since around 1994.

Except on a PC all of these can be disabled. Intel processors have a UID but this is disabled by default on all machines. Ethernet/WiFI MAC addresses are NOTHING compared to this. Apple's UID allows them all sorts of information. Say you change your itunes password, well with the email and user name, with the UID they can reset ANYTHING. It's a horrible design, the fact that it's on by default is crazy.

You do realize that every Android Phone, Windows Phone, and Blackberry also has a UUID, don't you?


And motherboard
 
2012-09-04 06:09:39 PM

Vaneshi: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Ha ha, because he was a cross-dresser.

And gay, allegedly. During a period of time when either of those would get you a nice, state and public approved beating from the police and the most meagre grain of proof of which would bar you from certain positions... like being the head of the FBI.

What are you, twelve?

Is it my fault your hero was an alleged closet homosexual with something to hide whilst simultaneously taking a hard line stance on 'subversives'... like gays and cross-dressers? No it is not my fault your hero was one of the largest hypocrites in recent history. Making insinuations about someones age simply because you dislike something they say makes you look retarded.


He's not my hero, you idiot. Hoover was a shiatbag and an evil man who ignored the constitution. I have no love for him at all. My entire point is that his personal proclivities are entirely irrelevant, and it's childish to bring them into a discussion over FBI snooping.
 
2012-09-04 06:11:37 PM

Vaneshi: Sylvia_Bandersnatch:
Could you try that again in *coherent* English, please? I'm about half getting it.

Then I suggest you reread it or ask someone else to dumb it down further. That's as low brow as I'm prepared to go with you.


See, this is why I try to never even bother talking to zeroes on Fark. I almost always end up regretting it. It's like trying to talk physics with a four-year-old.

Just go die or something, you useless little twat.
 
2012-09-04 06:13:20 PM

Slam Dunkz: Bob Down: Why does APPLE need all that stuff? Some of it makes sense.. the rest like user name, zipcode, phone number and address is none their farking business.

Maybe billing in iTunes? Not that it justifies it but if you REALLY want to get weirded out about this sort of thing you really need to think about what Google knows about you.

The UUIDs are to identify the actual device. Nothing freaky about that at all, it's used to know what machine is what, development build provisioning, etc.


All of you are missing the point, all that info is used to push advertising to you usually without you knowledge.

That's what all this is based on, advertising crap.
 
2012-09-04 07:36:14 PM
I was discussing tablets with a friend the other day. She has an Android tablet but lacks a rabid dislike of Apple products. We came to the conclusion that Apple is the Scientology of tech. The conclusion was reached through several common points.

Both groups are California based, insanely secretive, and overly litigious. Both have a now-deceased figurehead that has been raised to deity status by its followers. They both require an initial high financial outlay with continued payouts to receive new content and remain part of the organization.

The majority of their followers are devoted to the point that any criticism is met with rabid hostility and defense usually matched by a mother bird protecting her babies. Their critics are equally hostile to the point that they view both groups the same way Masons were viewed in previous generations.

We had other points leading us to the conclusion but these were our main ones. My personal views for both organizations is pretty neutral but I was amused the more we made connections.
 
2012-09-04 08:26:39 PM

myfakeonlineidentity: I was discussing tablets with a friend the other day. She has an Android tablet but lacks a rabid dislike of Apple products. We came to the conclusion that Apple is the Scientology of tech. The conclusion was reached through several common points.

Both groups are California based, insanely secretive, and overly litigious. Both have a now-deceased figurehead that has been raised to deity status by its followers. They both require an initial high financial outlay with continued payouts to receive new content and remain part of the organization.

The majority of their followers are devoted to the point that any criticism is met with rabid hostility and defense usually matched by a mother bird protecting her babies. Their critics are equally hostile to the point that they view both groups the same way Masons were viewed in previous generations.

We had other points leading us to the conclusion but these were our main ones. My personal views for both organizations is pretty neutral but I was amused the more we made connections.


Mind, blown. I've been comparing them to the RCC for years, but your analogy is *much* better. I would like to share it, if it's alright with you.

Another thought: both utlise tech that they don't want their paying customers to know too much about.
 
2012-09-04 11:03:49 PM

mcreadyblue: If you are innocent, you have nothing to fear.


Famous last words, a bitter epitaph on millions of graves
 
2012-09-05 01:59:22 PM

kbotc: I'm guessing this is actually from a case being brought against a popular app maker who was stealing personal information. Either that or it's Install0us's database that was actually leaked.


Or it's from the actual app maker getting owned and the FBI is only involved because the leaker decided he doesn't like them and wanted to pin it on them. But that's impossible, because everything I read on the internet is factual.
 
2012-09-05 07:35:13 PM
myfakeonlineidentity: I was discussing tablets with a friend the other day. She has an Android tablet but lacks a rabid dislike of Apple products. We came to the conclusion that Apple is the Scientology of tech. The conclusion was reached through several common points.

Both groups are California based, insanely secretive, and overly litigious. Both have a now-deceased figurehead that has been raised to deity status by its followers. They both require an initial high financial outlay with continued payouts to receive new content and remain part of the organization.

The majority of their followers are devoted to the point that any criticism is met with rabid hostility and defense usually matched by a mother bird protecting her babies. Their critics are equally hostile to the point that they view both groups the same way Masons were viewed in previous generations.

We had other points leading us to the conclusion but these were our main ones. My personal views for both organizations is pretty neutral but I was amused the more we made connections.

Mind, blown. I've been comparing them to the RCC for years, but your analogy is *much* better. I would like to share it, if it's alright with you.

Another thought: both utlise tech that they don't want their paying customers to know too much about.


Share away.
 
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