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(BBC)   Mountain Rescue called out to find same family on two successive nights: "It is rare for team members to become angry or frustrated with our casualties, but this was one of those occasions"   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 171
    More: Asinine, Lake District, mountain rescuers  
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22001 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Sep 2012 at 12:43 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-02 10:29:22 AM  
FTA: Mr Park, who leads the Cockermouth Mountain Rescue Team

I am so going hiking there.
 
2012-09-02 10:51:12 AM  
My BIL went hiking a few years ago by himself - he is a very experienced outdoorsmen, like he can tell you what plants you can and cannot eat, same with mushrooms...he can forage for all kinds of food, hunt, etc...he always registers at the ranger station or that main registration board that you see at many hiking trails...He is VERY well prepared to say the least.

So anyway, he ran into a small group of ill prepared 20-somethings. These morans were pretty freaked out and genuinely thought that they were lost and were going to die. No tail maps, no GPS, no way of starting a fire (They actually thought that they could just rub some sticks together like they do in the movies/on TV), very little in the way of food, no water purification apparatus or tablets, no toilet paper, they had paper thin sleeping bags (They were hiking in Mid-October in the Mountains of WV - yeah, it gets cold at night), no bug spray, no guns or bear spray, no first aid kits of any kind...one of the girls had already sprained her ankle - oh yeah, she was wearing Converse shoes! Their "hiking backpacks" were basically their school backpacks stuffed to the brim.

They did have plenty of alcohol and condoms though!

So as you can imagine, they were overcome with joy when my BIL stumbled upon them. They were about a full days walk from the park entrance. My BIL called the rangers office from his satellite phone and told them that he was leading a group of idiots back to the main park/campground and that they would probably need medical attention. After wrapping up the girl's sprained ankle, and feeding these dolts, they set off.

About 9pm they arrived back at the main campground with 2 ambulances waiting to check the kids out. My BIL debriefed the Ranger then the two of them went to the groups "leader" and chewed him the fark out in front of all of his friends. They then proceeded to scold the rest of the group and the ranger suggested that they never try this again.

My BIL got only one thank you from this group - the girl who sprained her ankle. The rest of the kids were indifferent and or apathetic to the whole situation. He is still pretty pissed about these assholes, not because of how ill prepared they were, but because a simple "thank you" seemed to hard to muster up.
 
2012-09-02 11:35:31 AM  
A few summers ago three men were going to set out on a trail that starts near my house (near whistler) and hike to Coquitlam, east of Vancouver. Two of the men bailed at the last minute but the third guy decided to go alone, even though his friends had the water and the tents and some other critical gear.

He disappeared, swallowed up by thousands of square km of Crown Land.

I'm an experienced hiker and I mentioned to a friend of mine, also very experienced, that I'd never even heard of this trail. He hadn't either. We finally found details in an old trail guide. Seemed gnarly and long and extreme. Given that we'd never heard of it (and most trail guides hadn't either) we assumed it wasn't exactly a well-used or well-maintained trail.

I'd be tempted to say "Good, let the guy rot. Darwin wins.", but I know too many SAR people who spent days/weeks looking for this lost idiot before the search was called off. For them it's a demoralizing and difficult and often heart-breaking job finding bodies and having to coordinate "dead-evac" or, as in this case, finding nothing and just leaving knowing he's out there (probably dead) somewhere and will likely never be found. For them, there's no sense of "stupid guy gets what he probably deserved". For them it's a permanent question mark of "could we have done more?" and "What if we'd searched one more day..?"

The signs at most trailheads ask "if you get lost today, will anyone know? If you get hurt or lost, are you prepared?". I take that very seriously. I can never understand why people don't.

/BC Story, Bro.
 
2012-09-02 11:39:48 AM  
People should get one free rescue, becasue shiat happens sometimes. But if they have to be rescued a 2nd time on the same trip, send 'em a bill for it.
 
2012-09-02 12:46:32 PM  
Adult sized leashes. Problem solved.
 
2012-09-02 12:47:53 PM  

Bill_Wick's_Friend: A few summers ago three men were going to set out on a trail that starts near my house (near whistler) and hike to Coquitlam, east of Vancouver. Two of the men bailed at the last minute but the third guy decided to go alone, even though his friends had the water and the tents and some other critical gear.

He disappeared, swallowed up by thousands of square km of Crown Land.

I'm an experienced hiker and I mentioned to a friend of mine, also very experienced, that I'd never even heard of this trail. He hadn't either. We finally found details in an old trail guide. Seemed gnarly and long and extreme. Given that we'd never heard of it (and most trail guides hadn't either) we assumed it wasn't exactly a well-used or well-maintained trail.

I'd be tempted to say "Good, let the guy rot. Darwin wins.", but I know too many SAR people who spent days/weeks looking for this lost idiot before the search was called off. For them it's a demoralizing and difficult and often heart-breaking job finding bodies and having to coordinate "dead-evac" or, as in this case, finding nothing and just leaving knowing he's out there (probably dead) somewhere and will likely never be found. For them, there's no sense of "stupid guy gets what he probably deserved". For them it's a permanent question mark of "could we have done more?" and "What if we'd searched one more day..?"

The signs at most trailheads ask "if you get lost today, will anyone know? If you get hurt or lost, are you prepared?". I take that very seriously. I can never understand why people don't.

/BC Story, Bro.


Hi Bill.

Here in Barrie, Ontario, we've started charging people for rescue. This past winter was an excellent example. We had a group of American fisherman out on Lake Simcoe, Ontario, who ended up on an ice flow, 2km out into the lake. They took the specialized life suits and pfd's that were provided by the fire rescue team and never returned them. The tax payers were out 25k. Since then, the council implanted a mandatory minimum fee for rescue. Hopefully, it'll cut down on darwinsim.
 
2012-09-02 12:48:20 PM  
Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, enjoy dying in the woods.
 
2012-09-02 12:50:03 PM  

VTGremlin: Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, enjoy dying in the woods.


You can't get fooled again.
 
2012-09-02 12:52:33 PM  
Fell walkers?
 
2012-09-02 12:53:09 PM  
I see people get lost in the city too easily (just the other day some lady was lost even though she had the GPS on her iPhone on and couldn't figure out how to use the map on the phone) so I can't imagine people would be any better out in the woods.
 
2012-09-02 12:53:45 PM  
Coming up at 11: Assholes are rarely polite.

/Romero.jpg
 
2012-09-02 12:54:40 PM  
Hell, I carry more survival gear than that on my daily drive to work.
 
2012-09-02 12:56:02 PM  
Maybe part of getting a hiking permit ought to include a small fee that actually purchases an insurance policy against dumbassery. Enough people manage to go into the wild and return safely that a few bucks tacked on would pay off for the idiots.

But there is definitely a part of me thinking, after the first rescue, let Mr. Darwin collect his tribute.
 
2012-09-02 12:57:24 PM  
"It was expressed in the strongest possible terms that we didn't feel that this party should make any attempts to continue their route, being neither equipped, fit enough, nor capable of making the sensible decisions required.

That would be a lawsuit in the US. It's a shame you can't speak the truth without getting sued.
 
2012-09-02 12:58:29 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com

Farking rescuers. As someone said above, first time you can chalk up to a shiatty day, second time, let Darwin win.
 
2012-09-02 01:00:09 PM  

skinink: I see people get lost in the city too easily (just the other day some lady was lost even though she had the GPS on her iPhone on and couldn't figure out how to use the map on the phone) so I can't imagine people would be any better out in the woods.


I had an ex-gf call me once from downtown Chicago. She asked me where something was. I told her the cross streets. She said, "no, where is it from here?" I told her I didn't know where she was. She got annoyed and told me the street she was on. I told her I needed to know a cross street or a number. She got more annoyed and told me a cross street. I told her, "Ok, you need to go about 7 blocks south." She asked me which direction south was. I told her to go whichever way made the numbers get smaller. She told me to stop treating her like a child.
 
2012-09-02 01:00:32 PM  
Test your equipment before heading out

img.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-02 01:00:51 PM  

indarwinsshadow: Here in Barrie, Ontario, we've started charging people for rescue


This (poorly designed, badly formatted, full of spelling mistakes) PDF has a number of reasons why SAR in BC doesn't want to start charging for rescues. I think they're mostly good and valid reasons.
 
2012-09-02 01:01:33 PM  
Let me try that again:

THIS poorly designed, badly formatted etc etc.....
 
2012-09-02 01:01:50 PM  

skinink: I see people get lost in the city too easily (just the other day some lady was lost even though she had the GPS on her iPhone on and couldn't figure out how to use the map on the phone) so I can't imagine people would be any better out in the woods.


And the natives in some cities can be as dangerous as woodland critters.
 
2012-09-02 01:04:35 PM  
I'm not an outdoorsy guy, but I love hearing stories from those with experience. There's just something riveting about a good nature yarn.

It's just sad that some people idolize idiots like Christopher McCandless instead of people who know what the fark they're doing.
 
2012-09-02 01:04:41 PM  

bacongood: She told me to stop treating her like a child.


Heh. So many retorts, so little time, eh?
 
kth
2012-09-02 01:07:24 PM  

Ennuipoet: FTA: Mr Park, who leads the Cockermouth Mountain Rescue Team

I am so going hiking there.


My husband and I went on a walk in Knob Noster state park earlier today, so I'm getting a kick out of this.

/hey sweetie, I'll noster your knob...
 
2012-09-02 01:09:51 PM  

bacongood: She told me to stop treating her like a child.


Sounds like a keeper. Shame you kids didn't work out.
 
2012-09-02 01:10:35 PM  
Mr. Eastwood has had a hard week. I wish everyone would just let him enjoy his vacation.
 
2012-09-02 01:11:11 PM  
I have always found that preparing for Cockermouth is a very good idea. If you are not well prepared for Cockermouth, it could end up most unpleasantly. So at the very least you should ask someone you trust who has done Cockermouth for advice and/or tips, but ideally you should train for it well in advance and consult experts in the field with regard to timing and any specialized equipment that you may want to consider. There are diagrams of Cockermouth readily available online, and with just a little research you can find what you need to determine whether you want to undertake Cockermouth in a prepared manner, or whether you want to avoid Cockermouth altogether. While it isn't for everyone, many, many people do Cockermouth regularly and enjoy it tremendously. My wife and I have done Cockermouth for years, and plan on coming again and again and again as long as we are both physically able.

/Cockermouth
 
2012-09-02 01:12:06 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2012-09-02 01:14:42 PM  
FTA: One rescuer suffered a broken leg during Friday's search operation.

Is it ironic that the people that got lost a second night in a row didn't break a leg?


Notabunny: Test your equipment before heading out

[img.photobucket.com image 640x448]


CLASSIC
 
2012-09-02 01:16:01 PM  

Endive Wombat: My BIL went hiking a few years ago by himself - he is a very experienced outdoorsmen, like he can tell you what plants you can and cannot eat, same with mushrooms...he can forage for all kinds of food, hunt, etc...he always registers at the ranger station or that main registration board that you see at many hiking trails...He is VERY well prepared to say the least.

So anyway, he ran into a small group of ill prepared 20-somethings. These morans were pretty freaked out and genuinely thought that they were lost and were going to die. No tail maps, no GPS, no way of starting a fire (They actually thought that they could just rub some sticks together like they do in the movies/on TV), very little in the way of food, no water purification apparatus or tablets, no toilet paper, they had paper thin sleeping bags (They were hiking in Mid-October in the Mountains of WV - yeah, it gets cold at night), no bug spray, no guns or bear spray, no first aid kits of any kind...one of the girls had already sprained her ankle - oh yeah, she was wearing Converse shoes! Their "hiking backpacks" were basically their school backpacks stuffed to the brim.

They did have plenty of alcohol and condoms though!

So as you can imagine, they were overcome with joy when my BIL stumbled upon them. They were about a full days walk from the park entrance. My BIL called the rangers office from his satellite phone and told them that he was leading a group of idiots back to the main park/campground and that they would probably need medical attention. After wrapping up the girl's sprained ankle, and feeding these dolts, they set off.

About 9pm they arrived back at the main campground with 2 ambulances waiting to check the kids out. My BIL debriefed the Ranger then the two of them went to the groups "leader" and chewed him the fark out in front of all of his friends. They then proceeded to scold the rest of the group and the ranger suggested that they never try this again.

My BIL got only one t ...


Damn, I've been hiking withthe wrong crowd.
 
2012-09-02 01:18:42 PM  
What's a BIL?
 
2012-09-02 01:20:43 PM  

Salmon: What's a BIL?


Brother in Law
 
2012-09-02 01:27:55 PM  
buzzards gotta eat, same as the worms
 
2012-09-02 01:28:29 PM  

Silly Jesus: [3.bp.blogspot.com image 500x409]

Farking rescuers. As someone said above, first time you can chalk up to a shiatty day, second time, let Darwin win.


Well, the hikers were 70 and 50 some odd years old. The 70 year old was the father so he had already passed his genetic material along. The 50 year olds may or may not have, the story is silent on that.

Darwin is really only applicable if one does not pass one's genetic material along to the next generation...so unfortunates (or the stupid) who die young, or non-breeders all win. Breeders, even the meth addled and crack whores and the men who can't seem to keep it zipped are all passing their genetic material along. True, it may be Idiocracy but you don't have to be smart to breed and pass your genes on.

These folks are just garden variety idiots.
 
2012-09-02 01:30:27 PM  

skinink: I see people get lost in the city too easily (just the other day some lady was lost even though she had the GPS on her iPhone on and couldn't figure out how to use the map on the phone) so I can't imagine people would be any better out in the woods.


A few years ago, a college-age woman asked me which direction was west. This was on Houston Street in Manhattan at sundown.
 
2012-09-02 01:35:02 PM  

cherryl taggart: Maybe part of getting a hiking permit ought to include a small fee that actually purchases an insurance policy against dumbassery. Enough people manage to go into the wild and return safely that a few bucks tacked on would pay off for the idiots.

But there is definitely a part of me thinking, after the first rescue, let Mr. Darwin collect his tribute.


Yeah but if too many people Darwin themselves eventually there will be lawsuits followed by hiking becoming illegal, thus ruining it for everyone else.
 
2012-09-02 01:35:19 PM  
Getting lost, unintentionally? It's more likely than you think. Not overgrown and rocky (with poor visibility), either:

One of my favorites from a drier clime: http://www.fjcruiserforums.com/forums/trail-use-safety-education/61292 -unsolved-missing-family-death-valley.html

img2-3.timeinc.net

/hot, like the desert
//a movie with nothing but atmosphere
 
2012-09-02 01:37:54 PM  

Molly Purebred: FTA: One rescuer suffered a broken leg during Friday's search operation.

Is it ironic that the people that got lost a second night in a row didn't break a leg?


Notabunny: Test your equipment before heading out

[img.photobucket.com image 640x448]

CLASSIC


Can someone explain that one to me? I've not seen that pic before on here.
 
2012-09-02 01:43:26 PM  
My favourite quote from the Avengers was: "Is the sun coming up?! Then put it on the left!", a lot of people tend to forget that.

When I lived in NYC I was quite lost one day around midday, and asked a police officer which way north was, he looked confused. I asked where uptown was and he answered readily. He wasn't an idiot, I just don't think it's a normal way for a lot of people to think in a city.



@Bill_Wick's_Friend thanks for the link, clearly it's intended to be part of a presentation, but it's got a lot of good info in it.
 
2012-09-02 01:50:47 PM  

thisisyourbrainonFark: Fell walkers


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fell_walkers
 
2012-09-02 01:53:27 PM  
I will personally go and punch that chick in the penis.
 
2012-09-02 01:58:03 PM  

pktloss: When I lived in NYC I was quite lost one day around midday, and asked a police officer which way north was, he looked confused. I asked where uptown was and he answered readily. He wasn't an idiot, I just don't think it's a normal way for a lot of people to think in a city.


I lived in Boulder, CO for a few years. Take a native, put them in another location, and they are completely lost since the mountains can no longer be looked to as a landmark. It was amusing to watch at times.
 
2012-09-02 01:58:34 PM  

Endive Wombat: My BIL went hiking a few years ago by himself - he is a very experienced outdoorsmen, like he can tell you what plants you can and cannot eat, same with mushrooms...he can forage for all kinds of food, hunt, etc...he always registers at the ranger station or that main registration board that you see at many hiking trails...He is VERY well prepared to say the least.

So anyway, he ran into a small group of ill prepared 20-somethings. These morans were pretty freaked out and genuinely thought that they were lost and were going to die. No tail maps, no GPS, no way of starting a fire (They actually thought that they could just rub some sticks together like they do in the movies/on TV), very little in the way of food, no water purification apparatus or tablets, no toilet paper, they had paper thin sleeping bags (They were hiking in Mid-October in the Mountains of WV - yeah, it gets cold at night), no bug spray, no guns or bear spray, no first aid kits of any kind...one of the girls had already sprained her ankle - oh yeah, she was wearing Converse shoes! Their "hiking backpacks" were basically their school backpacks stuffed to the brim.

They did have plenty of alcohol and condoms though!

So as you can imagine, they were overcome with joy when my BIL stumbled upon them. They were about a full days walk from the park entrance. My BIL called the rangers office from his satellite phone and told them that he was leading a group of idiots back to the main park/campground and that they would probably need medical attention. After wrapping up the girl's sprained ankle, and feeding these dolts, they set off.

About 9pm they arrived back at the main campground with 2 ambulances waiting to check the kids out. My BIL debriefed the Ranger then the two of them went to the groups "leader" and chewed him the fark out in front of all of his friends. They then proceeded to scold the rest of the group and the ranger suggested that they never try this again.

My BIL got only one t ...


I don't get people sometimes.

I mean, hell, I get wanting to party in the woods, stupid youth, etc... but if you can't even be effing bothered to check the weather or bring a flashlight... sigh. Or throw a freaking map in your pocket. If you're somewhere where the ranger station doesn't have a basic trail map, maybe take that as a sign not to wander around drunk and partying in that area and pick somewhere effing else.

pktloss: I just don't think it's a normal way for a lot of people to think in a city.


Your mind just gets stuck sometimes. I spent my youth knowing that toward one lake was East, toward a river/Canada was South. Spent the week with a lake to the West of me, and had to do plenty of double takes before I got my bearings around camp and driving around. And I've lived on that side of the state before... but I still default to my growing up directional references, at least for a few seconds before my critical thinking catches up to my knee-jerk reaction.

I sometimes wonder if it's a genetic thing. The one rescue I did as a lifeguard was this quirky little five year old girl who went down this slope into the deep end... just walked straight in. She was a day camper, so I went to talk to her grandfather when he came to pick her up about what happened. "oh, yeah, she's done that before".

Jesus effing Christ.
 
2012-09-02 02:01:12 PM  
Hiking the Grand Canyon a number of years back with my dad, a few miles after starting back up from the bottom we ran into a family that was in really bad shape. Mom, dad and two kids with just a small water bottle between them, and no food. They were planning on buying lunch at the bottom, but there is no store or restaurant at the bottom.

My dad is an EMT and was able to convince them that they needed to start back up to the top. We shared our food, water and water purification tablets and made sure they made it back to the top.

The kicker? The mom was a science teacher.

The Grand Canyon is especially mean to the under prepared since the easy part is first. It is all downhill until you get to the bottom. Then it is 110 degrees in the shade and you have 10 miles of uphill to go.
 
2012-09-02 02:01:46 PM  
CSB time. I was around 20 when three of my friends went to "camp" in Enchanted Rock, Texas. They took a cooler of beer, some sleeping bags, and some granola. A fourth friend left later to see if he could find them (this was before cellphones were everywhere). He took a bottle of Dr. Pepper and some Reece's Peanut Butter Cups.

During this experience they discovered lugging a cooler of iced beer five miles from the parking lot to the campsite is a lot harder than it looks. Also, even though they were native Texans they didn't quite realize that it's still kinda hot in October. Also, mosquitoes. The fourth guy only managed to find them because he made an ungodly racket coming down the trail and they went out to see who the dumbass was. By that time they were starving, so they took his Reese's for some beer. After some partying, they went to sleep. In the morning they discovered that dewfall makes everything pretty wet if you're not in a tent. Also, sunburn. They drank all the water from the melted ice in the cooler and went back to their cars.

So, nobody died or got lost, but I was absolutely astounded by the lack of any preparation on their part. Enchanted Rock isn't wilderness hiking but it's not a walk in the park, either. I'm as urban as they come, and I even knew they were being dumbasses.
 
2012-09-02 02:01:59 PM  

Fear the Clam: skinink: I see people get lost in the city too easily (just the other day some lady was lost even though she had the GPS on her iPhone on and couldn't figure out how to use the map on the phone) so I can't imagine people would be any better out in the woods.

A few years ago, a college-age woman asked me which direction was west. This was on Houston Street in Manhattan at sundown.


I didn't really make an effort to learn directions (as in think in north-south directions) until I was in my early 20s. I didn't need to. I didn't drive, I usually got rides to where ever I was going. Though I will usually tell people to make an effort to learn that when it's clear that they don't know it. That and major streets and you'll never be lost in the city again. I also grew up in the suburbs which aren't planned out like most North American cities.
I still get confused from time to time when I emerge from a subway.

Short version: directions aren't common sense, they have to be learned.
 
2012-09-02 02:07:21 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Your mind just gets stuck sometimes. I spent my youth knowing that toward one lake was East, toward a river/Canada was South. Spent the week with a lake to the West of me, and had to do plenty of double takes before I got my bearings around camp and driving around. And I've lived on that side of the state before... but I still default to my growing up directional references, at least for a few seconds before my critical thinking catches up to my knee-jerk reaction.


I grew up on the east coast, so if the ocean was on your right, you were heading north. Now that I live on the west coast, if the ocean is on my right, I'm heading south, but I sometimes get confused. I think our internal compass gets set in childhood, and it takes extra thinking to reset it if we move when we are older.

Of course, there are many people with no internal compass at all and get lost walking around the mall.
 
2012-09-02 02:14:47 PM  
We often get foreign (usually German) tourists who wind up dead. Just because the trails around here are only an hour or two out of the city doesn't mean a sudden change in the weather won't kill you.


I won't even go into all the BASE jumping rescues. Darwin, indeed. And if you already have kids and STILL insist on taking thr 'shortcut' down, there is something seriously wrong.
 
2012-09-02 02:16:48 PM  

Crazy Lee: Getting lost, unintentionally? It's more likely than you think. Not overgrown and rocky (with poor visibility), either:

One of my favorites from a drier clime: http://www.fjcruiserforums.com/forums/trail-use-safety-education/61292 -unsolved-missing-family-death-valley.html

[img2-3.timeinc.net image 270x270]

/hot, like the desert
//a movie with nothing but atmosphere


The one time I went to Death Valley I got rained out, along with a couple buses of Japanese tourists. There was nowhere for the water to go so it became a flood pretty quickly. January is not a good time to visit, I guess.
 
2012-09-02 02:21:51 PM  

filter: We often get foreign (usually German) tourists who wind up dead. Just because the trails around here are only an hour or two out of the city doesn't mean a sudden change in the weather won't kill you.


In Stavanger? I'd make sure I had a parka, jerky and water on me at all times. : )
 
2012-09-02 02:22:29 PM  

clear_prop: The kicker? The mom was a science teacher.


Doesn't mean she knows science. Bodes well for the future of this country.

/ "At least she's not a man," so sayeth the administrators
 
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