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(Science News)   World's longest fossilized 'death trackway' of a prehistoric creature found   (sci-news.com) divider line 14
    More: Interesting, prehistory, horseshoe crabs, living fossils, Jurassic period, pterosaurs, paleontology, fossils, Archaeopteryx  
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4839 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Sep 2012 at 2:54 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



14 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-09-01 10:19:23 AM
This is actually pretty cool.
 
2012-09-01 12:06:22 PM
I didn't know fossilized death trackways existed, much less the longest one

/Fark: expanding minds daily
//contributes to expanding butts, too
 
2012-09-01 02:26:16 PM
Not really fossilized, but a longer one:

i.imgur.com
 
2012-09-01 03:04:24 PM
Horseshoe crabs are awesome.

Quick cool story bro.. Was at Cape Henlopen this summer and watched a kid innocently get scared of a horseshoe crab and run at it with his toy shovel saying his was going to kill it.. Dad stopped him and explained how they aren't scary, endangered and not to kill it.. Kid kept crying and dad had to scoot him along but was nice to see a responsible parent educating their kids about nature..
 
2012-09-01 03:12:29 PM

Bontesla: This is actually pretty cool.


3.bp.blogspot.com

Agree. A 150 million year old death march.
 
2012-09-01 03:14:04 PM

dahmers love zombie: Not really fossilized, but a longer one:

[i.imgur.com image 400x393]


Snort and chuckle. +2 internets to you.
 
2012-09-01 04:16:31 PM
Prior longest death track:

AYNARD: It reads, 'Here may be found the last words of Joseph of
Aramathea. He who is valiant and pure of spirit may find the Holy Grail
in the Castle of uuggggggh'.
 
2012-09-01 07:23:27 PM

2wolves: dahmers love zombie: Not really fossilized, but a longer one:

[i.imgur.com image 400x393]

Snort and chuckle. +2 internets to you.


Add more internets.
 
2012-09-01 09:10:25 PM

Bontesla: This is actually pretty cool.


Quoted for ULTRA truth.
 
2012-09-01 10:19:44 PM
The tracks were made underwater and look really sharp and clean. How did they get buried (to be preserved) without obliterating them? Lagoons generally don't have extreme currents but they do have some, especially if the crab got deposited in the lagoon by a storm.. How much time would there be before currents blurred or erased them?
The crab itself looks very well preserved it obviously had to be encased before it was scavenged or decomposed.
Inquiring minds and all...
 
2012-09-01 10:59:24 PM

glass_ibis: The tracks were made underwater and look really sharp and clean. How did they get buried (to be preserved) without obliterating them? Lagoons generally don't have extreme currents but they do have some, especially if the crab got deposited in the lagoon by a storm.. How much time would there be before currents blurred or erased them?
The crab itself looks very well preserved it obviously had to be encased before it was scavenged or decomposed.
Inquiring minds and all...


I was going to dredge up what I learned about preservation from my geology classes, but then I remembered I'm on my laptop and can actually look stuff up. From Wiki:

During the Late Jurassic, this area was an archipelago at the edge of the Tethys Sea. This included placid lagoons that had limited access to the open sea and where salinity rose high enough that the resulting brine could not support life. Since the lowest water was devoid of oxygen, many ordinary scavengers were absent. Any organism that fell, drifted, or was washed into the lagoons from the ocean or the land became buried in soft carbonate mud. Thus, many delicate creatures avoided consumption by scavengers or being torn apart by currents. The wings of dragonflies, the imprints of stray feathers, and terrestrial plants that washed into the lagoons were all preserved. The fossils are not numerous, but some of them are spectacular, and their range gives a comprehensive picture of a local Jurassic ecosystem.

At times, the lagoons almost dried out, exposing sticky carbonate muds that trapped insects and even a few small dinosaurs. Over 600 species have been identified, including twenty-nine kinds of pterosaur ranging from the size of a sparrow to 1.2 m (4 ft) in length.
 
2012-09-02 02:24:15 AM

glass_ibis: The tracks were made underwater and look really sharp and clean. How did they get buried (to be preserved) without obliterating them? Lagoons generally don't have extreme currents but they do have some, especially if the crab got deposited in the lagoon by a storm.. How much time would there be before currents blurred or erased them?
The crab itself looks very well preserved it obviously had to be encased before it was scavenged or decomposed.
Inquiring minds and all...


Bollox answered, but I'll throw in my uneducated comment. A volcanic ash event like Pompay would also create sediment quickly underwater.
 
2012-09-02 07:21:23 AM
This kills the crab.
 
2012-09-02 10:01:01 AM
*cue death note soundtrack*
 
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