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(Bellingham Herald)   Pilot can't make it to the airport because he can't get fuel to the plane's engine. See if you can guess where he ended up   (bellinghamherald.com) divider line 77
    More: Amusing, Bellingham, Washington State Patrol, emergency landing, rear-view mirrors, helicopter pilot, airports, U.S. Border Patrol, Tony Dulley  
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16979 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Sep 2012 at 9:53 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-01 01:14:06 AM
"Experienced pilot"?

Had he turned on the carburetor heat, like you are supposed to when you are descending with an almost closed throttle, he would have had a routine flight to the airport.

His 7:1 or so glide ratio was also crap
 
2012-09-01 01:51:20 AM
See if you can guess where he ended up

A gas station?

*clicks*

I'll be damned...
 
2012-09-01 01:58:14 AM
"Hero pilot survives avoidable encounter with carb ice. Rudders miraculously unaffected"
 
2012-09-01 07:08:03 AM
Put me down for $500 on "the ground".
 
It's a sure bet, the only real questions are angle of and speed of descent.
 
2012-09-01 09:58:39 AM
apparently he made it to FARK

/my worst nightmare!
 
2012-09-01 10:00:02 AM
Huh. I was thinking "farmer's market".
 
2012-09-01 10:00:20 AM
This being Fark, I was going to guess "a bar".
 
2012-09-01 10:00:56 AM
He fixes the cable?
 
2012-09-01 10:01:39 AM

SmackLT: Put me down for $500 on "the ground".
 
It's a sure bet, the only real questions are angle of and speed of descent.


And how many pieces.
 
2012-09-01 10:01:43 AM
As he reached about 6,000 feet, he said, moisture in the air "iced" the carburetor and cut off fuel to the engine.

I don't understand this. His plane isn't capable of operating correctly in humid air? Western Washington isn't exactly the tropics.
 
2012-09-01 10:01:49 AM

strapp3r: apparently he made it to FARK

/my worst nightmare!


Naw however I get taken out finally I want the article about it to be on Fark.
 
2012-09-01 10:01:58 AM
One thing that bugs me no end about general aviation is how we are stuck with the same engine technology that existed in the '50s.

We have electric cars, and hybrids and all kinds of ideas for vehicles, yet we can't put something safer in an airplanes?

/&$*^*&# off my lawn
 
2012-09-01 10:02:17 AM
Unless this plane is different than any other carburetor equipped Cessna I've ever flown, there's a little device labeled "Carb Heat" located about an inch to the left of the throttle. You pull that bad boy out as soon as you notice the engine roughness, and it melts the ice on your carburetor. It's not a tough concept. The FAA is going to rack his ass if it turns out it wasn't pulled.
 
2012-09-01 10:08:05 AM

edmo: One thing that bugs me no end about general aviation is how we are stuck with the same engine technology that existed in the '50s.


Well, since his plane was built in 1957... that's to be expected.
 
2012-09-01 10:08:22 AM

edmo: One thing that bugs me no end about general aviation is how we are stuck with the same engine technology that existed in the '50s.

We have electric cars, and hybrids and all kinds of ideas for vehicles, yet we can't put something safer in an airplanes?

/&$*^*&# off my lawn


Because most of those ideas involve heavy batteries and 30-60 mile ranges, not something you want to fit into your little 150 or 172. Besides, this is the FAA, 50-60 years to get an idea approved seems downright speedy when dealing with them.
 
2012-09-01 10:10:03 AM

edmo: One thing that bugs me no end about general aviation is how we are stuck with the same engine technology that existed in the '50s.

We have electric cars, and hybrids and all kinds of ideas for vehicles, yet we can't put something safer in an airplanes?

/&$*^*&# off my lawn


We've got a 30K freezer that has a check valve used for pressure compensation and allowing the door to open. It periodically freezes up when the use increases and the humidity is high and causes the door to seal enough to not be opened once the temperature drops down. A real biatch to break that seal and get it open again.

If only we had invested that additional $580 for the optional valve heating cable designe to prevent icing...
 
2012-09-01 10:13:00 AM
Small aircraft are deathtraps, generally owned by guys who just want to show off that they can afford to buy their own plane. He survived THIS time. Just wait. Darwin will get his due.
 
2012-09-01 10:23:50 AM

acanuck: "Experienced pilot"?

Had he turned on the carburetor heat, like you are supposed to when you are descending with an almost closed throttle, he would have had a routine flight to the airport.

His 7:1 or so glide ratio was also crap


This once happened to my older brother. The problem was that due to poor maintenance by the company he rented the plane from, the car heat didn't work... He ended-up making an emergency landing on highway 20, just outside Montreal. The funny thing is that, once on the ground, the carb thawed and with the cops blocking off traffic, he was able to take-off again.
 
2012-09-01 10:32:12 AM

capt.hollister: acanuck: "Experienced pilot"?

Had he turned on the carburetor heat, like you are supposed to when you are descending with an almost closed throttle, he would have had a routine flight to the airport.

His 7:1 or so glide ratio was also crap

This once happened to my older brother. The problem was that due to poor maintenance by the company he rented the plane from, the car heat didn't work... He ended-up making an emergency landing on highway 20, just outside Montreal. The funny thing is that, once on the ground, the carb thawed and with the cops blocking off traffic, he was able to take-off again.


That is a very cool story, brosef :-)
 
2012-09-01 10:34:55 AM

capt.hollister: acanuck: "Experienced pilot"?

Had he turned on the carburetor heat, like you are supposed to when you are descending with an almost closed throttle, he would have had a routine flight to the airport.

His 7:1 or so glide ratio was also crap

This once happened to my older brother. The problem was that due to poor maintenance by the company he rented the plane from, the car heat didn't work... He ended-up making an emergency landing on highway 20, just outside Montreal. The funny thing is that, once on the ground, the carb thawed and with the cops blocking off traffic, he was able to take-off again.


Whereupon the carb refroze and he had to make another emergency landing?
 
2012-09-01 10:54:11 AM

farkityfarker: As he reached about 6,000 feet, he said, moisture in the air "iced" the carburetor and cut off fuel to the engine.

I don't understand this. His plane isn't capable of operating correctly in humid air? Western Washington isn't exactly the tropics.


Carb icing Happens because the air pressure drops inside the carburetor, expanding and cooling the air, and the gas mixture evaporating/aerosolizing also cools it more - like 50-60 degrees more. You don't need a hell of a lot of humidity to get enough moisture to unblock it.

But refilling at an ARCO station? With ethanol? Am I missing something? Do they use 100-octane leaded ethanol at ARCOs in WA? This guy did almost as much damage after the accident as during - clipped a sign on the way to the airport? That's willing recklessness in addition to the stupidity of icing up the carb. He's going to get excoriated by the FAA.
 
2012-09-01 10:55:29 AM
This thread settles it. Next time I fly, I'll pick my pilot from Fark.
 
2012-09-01 10:56:50 AM

Charlie Freak: You don't need a hell of a lot of outsidehumidity to get enough moisture to unblock it.


FTFM
 
2012-09-01 10:59:13 AM
My god, he's not still stuck up there, is he?
 
2012-09-01 11:01:38 AM
Helicopter pilot--turbine, no carb

Cessna pilot--major error not using carb heat

This probably will be his last flight after the FAA gets done
 
2012-09-01 11:07:41 AM

Charlie Freak:
But refilling at an ARCO station? With ethanol? Am I missing something? Do they use 100-octane leaded ethanol at ARCOs in WA? This guy did almost as much damage after the accident as during - clipped a sign on the way to the airport? That's willing recklessness in addition to the stupidity of icing up the carb. He's going to get excoriated by the FAA.


TFA said ethanol-free. Plane is old enough that it was probably designed for 80 octane, so it might have an Autofuel STC.
 
2012-09-01 11:13:06 AM

clear_prop: Charlie Freak:
But refilling at an ARCO station? With ethanol? Am I missing something? Do they use 100-octane leaded ethanol at ARCOs in WA? This guy did almost as much damage after the accident as during - clipped a sign on the way to the airport? That's willing recklessness in addition to the stupidity of icing up the carb. He's going to get excoriated by the FAA.

TFA said ethanol-free. Plane is old enough that it was probably designed for 80 octane, so it might have an Autofuel STC.


Fair enough - missed the "free" part.
 
2012-09-01 11:22:34 AM

Charlie Freak: clear_prop: Charlie Freak:
But refilling at an ARCO station? With ethanol? Am I missing something? Do they use 100-octane leaded ethanol at ARCOs in WA? This guy did almost as much damage after the accident as during - clipped a sign on the way to the airport? That's willing recklessness in addition to the stupidity of icing up the carb. He's going to get excoriated by the FAA.

TFA said ethanol-free. Plane is old enough that it was probably designed for 80 octane, so it might have an Autofuel STC.

Fair enough - missed the "free" part.


How could you miss free gas??????


/lol
 
2012-09-01 11:38:00 AM

acanuck: "Experienced pilot"?

Had he turned on the carburetor heat, like you are supposed to when you are descending with an almost closed throttle, he would have had a routine flight to the airport.

His 7:1 or so glide ratio was also crap


Cessnas made back in the day didn't have any such luxuries, my uncle owns one from 1974, doesn't have it either. He wound up rigging one. FAA certified it, and even thought it was a standard part that came with the engine. When he told them he had altered and installed it himself, the certification official told him, "You ever think about going into aircraft engineering?"

Short point: Cessnas are built like crap; but they do run, and are air serviceable, for practically forever if maintained.
 
2012-09-01 11:46:12 AM

SmackLT: Put me down for $500 on "the ground".
 
It's a sure bet, the only real questions are angle of and speed of descent.


I was going to add "in the water" to cover everything, but basically, yeah.
 
2012-09-01 12:05:16 PM

Jedekai: acanuck: "Experienced pilot"?

Had he turned on the carburetor heat, like you are supposed to when you are descending with an almost closed throttle, he would have had a routine flight to the airport.

His 7:1 or so glide ratio was also crap

Cessnas made back in the day didn't have any such luxuries, my uncle owns one from 1974, doesn't have it either. He wound up rigging one. FAA certified it, and even thought it was a standard part that came with the engine. When he told them he had altered and installed it himself, the certification official told him, "You ever think about going into aircraft engineering?"

Short point: Cessnas are built like crap; but they do run, and are air serviceable, for practically forever if maintained.


That's funny, because the 1962 Cessna 150 I like to fly around in in my spare time has one. It was built in. Maybe your uncle just had a crappy plane.
 
2012-09-01 12:07:54 PM
Oh God, not Bellingham!
 
2012-09-01 12:10:47 PM
Over Macho Grande?
 
2012-09-01 12:11:36 PM

Jedekai:

Short point: Cessnas are built like crap; but they do run, and are air serviceable, for practically forever if maintained.


If they're built like crap, why do they run forever?

The several hundred operators of Cessnas around the world that regularly fly 1950's and 60's airplane in the bush would probably disagree with you, if they weren't so busy flying their "crap" planes.
 
2012-09-01 12:13:04 PM
When I saw Bellingham, I thought that maybe he'd landed at a nearby refinery.

/Get yourself a Mooney with fuel injection (and a better glide ratio).
 
2012-09-01 12:17:47 PM
No Marx Brothers or They Might Be Giants quips? For shame!

"We run outta gasoline, and we gotta go back."
 
2012-09-01 12:21:20 PM

edmo: One thing that bugs me no end about general aviation is how we are stuck with the same engine technology that existed in the '50s.

We have electric cars, and hybrids and all kinds of ideas for vehicles, yet we can't put something safer in an airplanes?

/&$*^*&# off my lawn


The same technology has been around for so long because it's been proven to work for decades. I think even the newer Cessnas still have magnetos for the ignition. It is expensive for the manufacturer to 'try' new stuff, when there's a serious liability factor of DEATH should they get something wrong. Plus they'd have to get FAA approval, and as noted, they move at a snail's pace.

Same thing for modifying existing aircraft with a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC). VERY expensive, and usually takes years for approval.

"If it ain't broke, don't fix it"
 
2012-09-01 12:31:33 PM
"The rudders still worked, so he glided toward..."

Last time I checked, a Cessna 172 has only one rudder.

Just sayin'...

CSB - when I was learning how to skydive I did the static-line progression method (I was already Airborne in the Army, so it was kinda familiar to me), and our first six or seven jumps were from 172s. We had to literally hang off of the wing strut at 5000ft AGL for several seconds until the instructor gave us the signal to release. It was a pretty wild experience... but nothing like hopping out at 12500ft.
 
2012-09-01 12:44:07 PM
Nice legs on the girlfriend. I want to tap that.
 
2012-09-01 12:44:28 PM

humanshrapnel:
The same technology has been around for so long because it's been proven to work for decades. I think even the newer Cessnas still have magnetos for the ignition.


They do indeed. The 2009 C172SP that I flew during my PPL lessons has magnetos. Garmin G1000 glass for avionics though, which was pretty sweet. Modern small GA planes are a nice contradiction between state-of-the-art and legacy technologies.
 
2012-09-01 01:00:49 PM
Keynote speaker for the RNC convention?
 
2012-09-01 01:06:46 PM

2words1finger: "The rudders still worked, so he glided toward..."

Last time I checked, a Cessna 172 has only one rudder.


Ailerons are hard. They can also be mistaken for nipplage.
 
2012-09-01 01:18:20 PM

Jedekai: acanuck: "Experienced pilot"?

Had he turned on the carburetor heat, like you are supposed to when you are descending with an almost closed throttle, he would have had a routine flight to the airport.

His 7:1 or so glide ratio was also crap

Cessnas made back in the day didn't have any such luxuries, my uncle owns one from 1974, doesn't have it either. He wound up rigging one. FAA certified it, and even thought it was a standard part that came with the engine. When he told them he had altered and installed it himself, the certification official told him, "You ever think about going into aircraft engineering?"

Short point: Cessnas are built like crap; but they do run, and are air serviceable, for practically forever if maintained.


The 1975 model I got my ticket in had carb heat.
 
2012-09-01 01:23:50 PM

devildog123: Unless this plane is different than any other carburetor equipped Cessna I've ever flown, there's a little device labeled "Carb Heat" located about an inch to the left of the throttle. You pull that bad boy out as soon as you notice the engine roughness, and it melts the ice on your carburetor. It's not a tough concept. The FAA is going to rack his ass if it turns out it wasn't pulled.


Use of carb heat is so instinctive that I have to think that maybe his carb heat malfunctioned rather than he forgot about it.
 
2012-09-01 01:24:59 PM

sthopkins: Jedekai: acanuck: "Experienced pilot"?

Had he turned on the carburetor heat, like you are supposed to when you are descending with an almost closed throttle, he would have had a routine flight to the airport.

His 7:1 or so glide ratio was also crap

Cessnas made back in the day didn't have any such luxuries, my uncle owns one from 1974, doesn't have it either. He wound up rigging one. FAA certified it, and even thought it was a standard part that came with the engine. When he told them he had altered and installed it himself, the certification official told him, "You ever think about going into aircraft engineering?"

Short point: Cessnas are built like crap; but they do run, and are air serviceable, for practically forever if maintained.

The 1975 model I got my ticket in had carb heat.


So did the '68 model I soloed in.
 
2012-09-01 01:46:08 PM

Eriond: humanshrapnel:
The same technology has been around for so long because it's been proven to work for decades. I think even the newer Cessnas still have magnetos for the ignition.

They do indeed. The 2009 C172SP that I flew during my PPL lessons has magnetos. Garmin G1000 glass for avionics though, which was pretty sweet. Modern small GA planes are a nice contradiction between state-of-the-art and legacy technologies.


Magnetos are still a viable piece of tech - they keep the spark plugs firing even when the battery/alternator fails.
 
2012-09-01 01:59:08 PM

Charlie Freak: Eriond: humanshrapnel:
The same technology has been around for so long because it's been proven to work for decades. I think even the newer Cessnas still have magnetos for the ignition.

They do indeed. The 2009 C172SP that I flew during my PPL lessons has magnetos. Garmin G1000 glass for avionics though, which was pretty sweet. Modern small GA planes are a nice contradiction between state-of-the-art and legacy technologies.

Magnetos are still a viable piece of tech - they keep the spark plugs firing even when the battery/alternator fails.


The experimental guys have been using p-mags for a while now, which are self-powering electric ignition units. Some teething problems initially but they seem to be over that.
 
2012-09-01 02:04:10 PM

jjorsett: sthopkins: Jedekai: acanuck: "Experienced pilot"?

Had he turned on the carburetor heat, like you are supposed to when you are descending with an almost closed throttle, he would have had a routine flight to the airport.

His 7:1 or so glide ratio was also crap

Cessnas made back in the day didn't have any such luxuries, my uncle owns one from 1974, doesn't have it either. He wound up rigging one. FAA certified it, and even thought it was a standard part that came with the engine. When he told them he had altered and installed it himself, the certification official told him, "You ever think about going into aircraft engineering?"

Short point: Cessnas are built like crap; but they do run, and are air serviceable, for practically forever if maintained.

The 1975 model I got my ticket in had carb heat.

So did the '68 model I soloed in.


All of the carbed Cessna products do, but personally I've never experienced ice other than in a c150, which had the famously ice-producing Continental o200.
 
2012-09-01 02:06:47 PM
Didn't read the article, but I imagine he made it all the way to the crash site.

/I'll never be over Macho Grande
 
2012-09-01 02:11:17 PM
Subby's mom's house?
 
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