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(Daily Mail)   The most expensive and cheapest places to live in America. Mom's basement: PRICELESS   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 105
    More: Interesting, Long Island City, new york city borough, Wichita Falls, McAllen, Harlingen, relief, North Texas, average cost  
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13863 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Sep 2012 at 12:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-01 12:35:30 AM
There's a reason Manhattan is twice as expensive to live in as Springfield, Illinois. You know what there is to do in Springfield, Illinois? Go to a bar and eat a horseshoe - an open face sandwich covered in fries, drenched in some liquid-cheeselike goo. Oh, and there's the Lincoln museum. Museum and every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese. That's it.
 
2012-09-01 12:52:31 AM

syrynxx: There's a reason Manhattan is twice as expensive to live in as Springfield, Illinois. You know what there is to do in Springfield, Illinois? Go to a bar and eat a horseshoe - an open face sandwich covered in fries, drenched in some liquid-cheeselike goo. Oh, and there's the Lincoln museum. Museum and every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese. That's it.


In Manhattan? Pretty much the same, different scenery and 10x the prices. Oh, you can easily get mugged as well.
 
2012-09-01 12:52:48 AM

syrynxx: every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese


So wait, why is it cheaper?
 
2012-09-01 12:55:15 AM

flucto: syrynxx: every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese

So wait, why is it cheaper?


Less bread?
 
2012-09-01 12:56:33 AM
farm4.static.flickr.com
"People prefer cities like New York and San Francisco over ed-state armpit burgs full of drooling slack-jawed Palin fans!"
 
2012-09-01 12:58:35 AM
Why is San Jose north of San Francisco?
 
2012-09-01 12:59:47 AM
And Minnesota is horrible. Don't move here.
 
2012-09-01 01:00:24 AM
Her bedroom is pretty cheap, too.
 
2012-09-01 01:00:53 AM

M0nkeyp0x: In Manhattan? Pretty much the same, different scenery and 10x the prices. Oh, you can easily get mugged as well.


In Manhattan they take the plainest food they have and elevate it to some sort of mythical level. There's a mystique around a New York hotdog which is entirely unfulfilled by the actual product.
 
2012-09-01 01:00:56 AM
I want to live on Sesame Street.
 
2012-09-01 01:01:42 AM
right now the most expensive place for housing is in Williston, ND.
That's right, North Dakota!
 
2012-09-01 01:04:33 AM

syrynxx: There's a reason Manhattan is twice as expensive to live in as Springfield, Illinois. You know what there is to do in Springfield, Illinois? Go to a bar and eat a horseshoe - an open face sandwich covered in fries, drenched in some liquid-cheeselike goo. Oh, and there's the Lincoln museum. Museum and every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese. That's it.


farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2012-09-01 01:06:35 AM
I grew up in Northern CA. Sacramento - 2 hours from San Francisco. My family moved up into the mountains in the late 80s - between Placerville and Sacramento. I visit home twice a year, and around '05, I was amazed that shiatty little tract homes (like the one I grew up in) were on the market for upwards of the quarter million dollar mark. My parents bought that home in Citrus Heights when I was a newborn in '66 for I dont know, maybe 25 grand? If that? (Yikes! I've divulged my age! No shame in my game...) I've been in GA since '93 and live in a much nicer home than I ever imagined I'd ever live in. It lists for half of what a dump in a bad neighborhood in CA lists for but I'm within a half hour of the city (Atlanta) and all my cultural needs, and have a big, wooded yard for my dogs. Frankly, now that my boy is off to college and on his own, it's too damn big. I never go upstairs and it's a weekend project to clean the right way. It's too damn big. I'd love to live back in CA......in a smaller space.....up in the woods where my family is at. I'd be ok in a small place but the small places where I want to live are built with spit and toilet paper - no craftsmanship. So. When I retire, I want to buy a spot of land, we can live in our 5th wheel, and build what we want, a small cabin with a yard for our dogs. As much as I love CA, it will most likely be in the south. Much more affordable in general.
 
2012-09-01 01:06:45 AM

syrynxx: There's a reason Manhattan is twice as expensive to live in as Springfield, Illinois. You know what there is to do in Springfield, Illinois? Go to a bar and eat a horseshoe - an open face sandwich covered in fries, drenched in some liquid-cheeselike goo. Oh, and there's the Lincoln museum. Museum and every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese. That's it.


Thankfully there are many places that fall in between. For the cost of a small studio apartment or condo in a major city you can have a nice sized house, car, and privacy in the suburbs of more modest sized burbs and still have plenty of money left over to actually do things you enjoy. Plus, you an always drive into the bigger city when you want to take advantage of the things that are only available there.
 
2012-09-01 01:07:02 AM

whatshisname: M0nkeyp0x: In Manhattan? Pretty much the same, different scenery and 10x the prices. Oh, you can easily get mugged as well.

In Manhattan they take the plainest food they have and elevate it to some sort of mythical level. There's a mystique around a New York hotdog which is entirely unfulfilled by the actual product.




Without those delusions they'd all kill themselves at the realization that they live in an overpopulated shiathole. Human beings weren't designed to live in a hive.
 
2012-09-01 01:09:14 AM
Living in a 9 square foot apartment in Tokyo that costs three fourths of my monthly salary, I curse all of you from the deepest parts of my soul.
 
2012-09-01 01:10:11 AM
meh. iowa is pretty cheap and I enjoy watching bugs fly into the lights more than television so I got that going.
 
2012-09-01 01:13:10 AM
there's a BIG reason why Muskogee is cheap...
 
2012-09-01 01:15:41 AM
Weird that Framingham MA is on the list. It's kind of on the periphery of Boston suburbs, and I never got the impression that it was a particularly upscale town. Is there some factor contributing to the "cost of living" number that I'm missing?
 
2012-09-01 01:15:57 AM
I'd love to live where I grew up, Northern California, but a crappy shack in a bad neighborhood costs what this roomy house in GA on a huge, wooded lot costs. Too much house, frankly, but it's home now. I'd love to retire on a big piece of land, within an hour of civilization, but with no neighbors but nature. Hell, I could live in our 5th wheel as long as its fenced for our dogs. On track for that to happen.

I want to retire on a lake and live simply. That's about 10 years out. Not worried about impressing anyone with where I live.
 
2012-09-01 01:18:13 AM
East Texas don't got no basements, we have flood problems.

\And please stay in your home states. Do it for America and your children's future.
 
2012-09-01 01:21:55 AM

freetomato: I'd love to live where I grew up, Northern California, but a crappy shack in a bad neighborhood costs what this roomy house in GA on a huge, wooded lot costs. Too much house, frankly, but it's home now. I'd love to retire on a big piece of land, within an hour of civilization, but with no neighbors but nature. Hell, I could live in our 5th wheel as long as its fenced for our dogs. On track for that to happen.

I want to retire on a lake and live simply. That's about 10 years out. Not worried about impressing anyone with where I live.


I live about 30 minutes from San Francisco. A one room loft in the city costs more than my two bedroom apartment (in a good neighborhood). Damn hipsters just want to say they live in SOMA and are willing to pay anything for the privilege of winos urinating on their front door while I could probably leave my car unlocked over night and not have anything stolen.
 
2012-09-01 01:25:21 AM

OgreMagi: freetomato: I'd love to live where I grew up, Northern California, but a crappy shack in a bad neighborhood costs what this roomy house in GA on a huge, wooded lot costs. Too much house, frankly, but it's home now. I'd love to retire on a big piece of land, within an hour of civilization, but with no neighbors but nature. Hell, I could live in our 5th wheel as long as its fenced for our dogs. On track for that to happen.

I want to retire on a lake and live simply. That's about 10 years out. Not worried about impressing anyone with where I live.

I live about 30 minutes from San Francisco. A one room loft in the city costs more than my two bedroom apartment (in a good neighborhood). Damn hipsters just want to say they live in SOMA and are willing to pay anything for the privilege of winos urinating on their front door while I could probably leave my car unlocked over night and not have anything stolen.


I'm sure it's very nice living in your cookie cutter vanilla white bread suburban piece of plastic heaven.

Some people don't like culture. That's cool. No harm no foul.
 
2012-09-01 01:25:51 AM

M0nkeyp0x: syrynxx: There's a reason Manhattan is twice as expensive to live in as Springfield, Illinois. You know what there is to do in Springfield, Illinois? Go to a bar and eat a horseshoe - an open face sandwich covered in fries, drenched in some liquid-cheeselike goo. Oh, and there's the Lincoln museum. Museum and every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese. That's it.

In Manhattan? Pretty much the same, different scenery and 10x the prices. Oh, you can easily get mugged as well.


keep telling yourself that, cheesehead bowling ball. your ignorance is simply epic. some day when you take a trip outside your town limits you'll see there's a great big world out there. moran.
 
2012-09-01 01:28:44 AM
I like that two of the three "cheapest" places to live are two places in America where you can be kidnapped by drug cartels...wonder where Escondido falls on that scale?
 
2012-09-01 01:30:45 AM

TuteTibiImperes: syrynxx: There's a reason Manhattan is twice as expensive to live in as Springfield, Illinois. You know what there is to do in Springfield, Illinois? Go to a bar and eat a horseshoe - an open face sandwich covered in fries, drenched in some liquid-cheeselike goo. Oh, and there's the Lincoln museum. Museum and every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese. That's it.

Thankfully there are many places that fall in between. For the cost of a small studio apartment or condo in a major city you can have a nice sized house, car, and privacy in the suburbs of more modest sized burbs and still have plenty of money left over to actually do things you enjoy. Plus, you an always drive into the bigger city when you want to take advantage of the things that are only available there.


Big cities and suburbs are great in different ways. But at this point in my life (raising 2 kids), I'll take the suburbs. In 2 hours we can be in San Francisco, San Jose, Lake Tahoe or Big Trees. A little more and were in Yosemite. Home is quiet, safe, has good schools and is affordable on a single income.
 
2012-09-01 01:31:41 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: OgreMagi: freetomato: I'd love to live where I grew up, Northern California, but a crappy shack in a bad neighborhood costs what this roomy house in GA on a huge, wooded lot costs. Too much house, frankly, but it's home now. I'd love to retire on a big piece of land, within an hour of civilization, but with no neighbors but nature. Hell, I could live in our 5th wheel as long as its fenced for our dogs. On track for that to happen.

I want to retire on a lake and live simply. That's about 10 years out. Not worried about impressing anyone with where I live.

I live about 30 minutes from San Francisco. A one room loft in the city costs more than my two bedroom apartment (in a good neighborhood). Damn hipsters just want to say they live in SOMA and are willing to pay anything for the privilege of winos urinating on their front door while I could probably leave my car unlocked over night and not have anything stolen.

I'm sure it's very nice living in your cookie cutter vanilla white bread suburban piece of plastic heaven.

Some people don't like culture. That's cool. No harm no foul.


I don't consider the smell of urine, drunks fighting outside my window at 3am, or my car broken into on a regular basis as culture. I realize San Francisco hipsters think it is, but they were dropped on their heads quite often as children. Let me guess, you pay $2700 for a one bedroom loft in the SOMA district and ride a fixie.
 
2012-09-01 01:32:11 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Living in a 9 square foot apartment in Tokyo that costs three fourths of my monthly salary, I curse all of you from the deepest parts of my soul.


Look into Hiroshima or Nagasaki. For some reason real estate prices are lower there.
 
2012-09-01 01:34:00 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Thankfully there are many places that fall in between.


Like Portland, Or (where I live now). I always described it as the city that Goldilocks chose. Not too expensive, not too cheap, not too big, not too small, not too hot, not too cold, etc.


OgreMagi: I live about 30 minutes from San Francisco. A one room loft in the city costs more than my two bedroom apartment (in a good neighborhood). Damn hipsters just want to say they live in SOMA and are willing to pay anything for the privilege of winos urinating on their front door while I could probably leave my car unlocked over night and not have anything stolen.


Funny thing is I lived in SF for five years and parked my car in some of the shiattiest sections of the Mission you can imagine. At night. No one ever touched my car. Then one day my GF borrows it (the first and only time) to take to work and it gets stolen. In broad daylight. Outside a busy hospital. Of course that was the one time I left gear in the trunk (drum machine, mixer, effects units, etc). The stuff in the trunk was worth more than the car (and there's no way anyone could have known it was there). And my insurance had expired a week before.

/not so cool story, etc
 
2012-09-01 01:34:05 AM
good one subby. I bow to you.
 
2012-09-01 01:34:11 AM
My hometown rocks and your hometown sucks.
 
2012-09-01 01:37:12 AM

OgreMagi: freetomato: I'd love to live where I grew up, Northern California, but a crappy shack in a bad neighborhood costs what this roomy house in GA on a huge, wooded lot costs. Too much house, frankly, but it's home now. I'd love to retire on a big piece of land, within an hour of civilization, but with no neighbors but nature. Hell, I could live in our 5th wheel as long as its fenced for our dogs. On track for that to happen.

I want to retire on a lake and live simply. That's about 10 years out. Not worried about impressing anyone with where I live.

I live about 30 minutes from San Francisco. A one room loft in the city costs more than my two bedroom apartment (in a good neighborhood). Damn hipsters just want to say they live in SOMA and are willing to pay anything for the privilege of winos urinating on their front door while I could probably leave my car unlocked over night and not have anything stolen.


I hear ya. I love CA, I really do, but I can't afford to live there. I want to be spittin' distance to culture (can you tell I've been in the South for a long time?) but not worry about urban crime/ugliness. I'll be a CA girl in my bones till I die, but unless I win the lottery I can't see that happening. Which saddens me. I' d love for that retirement lot of land to be in, say, El Dorado County/Placer County but again, shacks going for upwards of 200k? I can live simply but I won't live in an overpriced hovel, and that's what I see in my price range. Homes that cheap in that area have their share of problems that I don't want to deal with. I'm trying to convince my CA family to invade the cheap South ;D
 
2012-09-01 01:42:57 AM

syrynxx: There's a reason Manhattan is twice as expensive to live in as Springfield, Illinois. You know what there is to do in Springfield, Illinois? Go to a bar and eat a horseshoe - an open face sandwich covered in fries, drenched in some liquid-cheeselike goo. Oh, and there's the Lincoln museum. Museum and every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese. That's it.


I did 18 years in Springfield. I love me a good horseshoe sandwich. I went to a place here in Chicago that has a horseshoe on the menu, and it was an abomination. Melted cheese instead of a proper cheese sauce made with a stout or porter, and the ratio of fries to meat to bread was about 15:1:1 instead of the 1:1:1 that it should be. It was clearly the work of someone who had only read about the horseshoe somewhere, but never bothered to travel to the land of its birth to learn how to truly make one.

Frank Lloyd Wright's Dana-Thomas house is quite nice, too. Between that and the Lincoln sites, there's a fairly pleasant day to be had in Springfield. If you've booked two nights at your hotel, though, be prepared for plenty of boredom.
 
2012-09-01 01:43:10 AM
Don't get any ideas, we don't want you here.

/keep flying over
 
2012-09-01 01:43:53 AM
There was a recent article (I want to say on Forbes, but I can't find it) listing the 25 most (and least) expensive places in the States. But unlike this article, they didn't go by the Cost of Living Index, but by more comprehensive factors, like average home prices, incomes, crime rates, and so forth. Major cities were excluded because of the wide disparities in the various neighborhoods.

"Harlingen, Texas, a border town on the southern tip of the Lone Star state, came in at the cheapest, with a cost of living index at 81.6 or 18.4 per cent below the national average."

Methinks that the drug cartels operating around border towns have a lot to do with that cheap COL index. I'd feel safer living in Detroit.
 
2012-09-01 01:44:26 AM
I lived in Fayetteville, Arkansas for 6 years while in grad school. GREAT place to live, but I'm surprised it's on this list as one of the cheapest places to live. It's more expensive than a lot of places, but what it does have is great value. Good community atmosphere, low crime, reasonably educated populace (especially compared to the surrounding areas), easy to get around in, some nice aspects of city living while retaining a small country town atmosphere, etc.

I miss it quite a bit.
 
2012-09-01 01:45:57 AM
And I said "average" when I meant "median." D'oh.
 
2012-09-01 01:48:26 AM

fusillade762: TuteTibiImperes: Thankfully there are many places that fall in between.

Like Portland, Or (where I live now). I always described it as the city that Goldilocks chose. Not too expensive, not too cheap, not too big, not too small, not too hot, not too cold, etc.


OgreMagi: I live about 30 minutes from San Francisco. A one room loft in the city costs more than my two bedroom apartment (in a good neighborhood). Damn hipsters just want to say they live in SOMA and are willing to pay anything for the privilege of winos urinating on their front door while I could probably leave my car unlocked over night and not have anything stolen.

Funny thing is I lived in SF for five years and parked my car in some of the shiattiest sections of the Mission you can imagine. At night. No one ever touched my car. Then one day my GF borrows it (the first and only time) to take to work and it gets stolen. In broad daylight. Outside a busy hospital. Of course that was the one time I left gear in the trunk (drum machine, mixer, effects units, etc). The stuff in the trunk was worth more than the car (and there's no way anyone could have known it was there). And my insurance had expired a week before.

/not so cool story, etc


That sucks. Bad Luck has bitten me on the ass like that more than once, in rapid succession. But you regroup, right? I won't bore you with how every vehicle we own except our lawnmower broke down all at once. $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

I'm in the semi-boondocks....25 minutes down the interstate from downtown Atlanta. I love that - Atlanta has a good music scene, good restaurants, festivals, etc. I can be there in no time if I'm up for it. If I want to stick close to home I can...and I usually do. I work hard. I like home. I've never felt unsafe, even when I hear of home invasions 26 minutes up the road. I have four dogs in a big fenced yard. No criminal with half a brain is going to come near my house. I have a gun safe full of fun range toys that will gather dust before I open it in fear. Bad guys avoid dogs.

I ramble. Blame Evan Williams and no alarm clock.
 
2012-09-01 01:49:00 AM

OgreMagi: AverageAmericanGuy: OgreMagi: freetomato: I'd love to live where I grew up, Northern California, but a crappy shack in a bad neighborhood costs what this roomy house in GA on a huge, wooded lot costs. Too much house, frankly, but it's home now. I'd love to retire on a big piece of land, within an hour of civilization, but with no neighbors but nature. Hell, I could live in our 5th wheel as long as its fenced for our dogs. On track for that to happen.

I want to retire on a lake and live simply. That's about 10 years out. Not worried about impressing anyone with where I live.

I live about 30 minutes from San Francisco. A one room loft in the city costs more than my two bedroom apartment (in a good neighborhood). Damn hipsters just want to say they live in SOMA and are willing to pay anything for the privilege of winos urinating on their front door while I could probably leave my car unlocked over night and not have anything stolen.

I'm sure it's very nice living in your cookie cutter vanilla white bread suburban piece of plastic heaven.

Some people don't like culture. That's cool. No harm no foul.

I don't consider the smell of urine, drunks fighting outside my window at 3am, or my car broken into on a regular basis as culture. I realize San Francisco hipsters think it is, but they were dropped on their heads quite often as children. Let me guess, you pay $2700 for a one bedroom loft in the SOMA district and ride a fixie.


I've lived in SF for 11 years, with street parking, and never once have had my car broken into. Most places in town smell just fine. Have your visits here focused solely on the Tenderloin? I am raising my baby in this wonderful city and willing to spend the pretty penny necessary to do so in order to surround him with all this culture - museums, neighborhood farmers markets, amazing urban street festivals and parks and restaurants, the intermingling of dozens of different ethnicities, fabulous live music. The homeless problem here is brutal, and our public transit officials and certain self righteous cyclists need to be shot, but overall, if there's any city It's with going broke to live in, It's this one.

And this article seems out of date. SF is now the most expensive rental market in the country; surely that's got to propel us up the list.
 
2012-09-01 01:52:35 AM
If you've ever been to Harlingen, Wichita Falls, or McAllen, you'd know why they're so cheap.

Kinda surprised San Marcos is there, though. It's not horrible.
 
2012-09-01 01:56:26 AM

Notabunny: TuteTibiImperes: syrynxx: There's a reason Manhattan is twice as expensive to live in as Springfield, Illinois. You know what there is to do in Springfield, Illinois? Go to a bar and eat a horseshoe - an open face sandwich covered in fries, drenched in some liquid-cheeselike goo. Oh, and there's the Lincoln museum. Museum and every restaurant in town serving open-faced sandwiches covered in fries and fake cheese. That's it.

Thankfully there are many places that fall in between. For the cost of a small studio apartment or condo in a major city you can have a nice sized house, car, and privacy in the suburbs of more modest sized burbs and still have plenty of money left over to actually do things you enjoy. Plus, you an always drive into the bigger city when you want to take advantage of the things that are only available there.

Big cities and suburbs are great in different ways. But at this point in my life (raising 2 kids), I'll take the suburbs. In 2 hours we can be in San Francisco, San Jose, Lake Tahoe or Big Trees. A little more and were in Yosemite. Home is quiet, safe, has good schools and is affordable on a single income.


Elk Grove...wow....my grandma owned 25 acres on Sheldon Road. After she passed, the property was sold...it is now a pretty subdivision. I might have flown a kite as a child in what is now your yard.
 
2012-09-01 01:57:17 AM

juvandy: I lived in Fayetteville, Arkansas for 6 years while in grad school. GREAT place to live, but I'm surprised it's on this list as one of the cheapest places to live. It's more expensive than a lot of places, but what it does have is great value. Good community atmosphere, low crime, reasonably educated populace (especially compared to the surrounding areas), easy to get around in, some nice aspects of city living while retaining a small country town atmosphere, etc.

I miss it quite a bit.


I don't know where Fayetteville is in comparison to Little Rock, but I've always thought the latter looked neat. It looks like a cool town. Decent (for Arkansas) amount of things to do, good community, and dirt cheap. I live in the suburbs of Philly, and for a town with nothing to do, no jobs, and tons of old people, the cost of living is astonishing. When my health is back in order, I'm outta here. Of course, that's years down the road, but Little Rock is one of the places I keep coming back to.

/as well as Kansas City, Austin, Tampa/Clearwater/St. Petersburg, and Orlando/Lakeland
//yeah, I know, but I have friends in the latter two
 
2012-09-01 01:57:26 AM
I like my town. Gas is $4.40/gallon, and milk is $5/gallon, but my annual property taxes are about $25. Kind of the opposite of New Jersey.
 
2012-09-01 01:57:33 AM
Some of the cost is reflective of the economic activity of an area. Some of it has to do with the desirability of an area.

If the main business in your town is banking and management of course things are going to get higher. If the main business in your town is running bars for the Air Force base and oil crew roughnecks then things are going to slide to the low end.

And complaints about "nothing to do" just show's you're a dick. San Marcos is between Austin and San Antonio. And if you're in Harlingen you can go lawnmower racing. They don't even have lawnmowers in some of those top ten cities.

upload.wikimedia.org

/There's meta humor in there somewhere.
 
2012-09-01 01:57:39 AM
It'd be nice to live in a cheaper place than the Puget Sound area (pretty much halfway between Seattle and Tacoma), but I like it here too much.

Texas, yeah it's cheap, but you won't find me there ever unless it's just a vacation for the food. I'd melt within a week of entering that freakishly hot climate. Not to mention a lot of Texans scare the crap out of me. Not the sane ones mind you, it's the other ones... >_>
 
2012-09-01 01:59:37 AM
I lived in Wichita Falls, Texas, been to Muskogee, Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, Fayetteville, Arkansas, Memphis, Tennessee and Ardmore, Oklahoma. There is no mystery at all why these are cheap places to live.
Wichita Falls was a pit. It has a terrible climate and for a while at least its chief claim to fame was calling itself the "Tornado Capitol of the World".
If they don't smoke marijuana in Muskogee it is because they are too drunk to light up.
Norman and Ardmore are rivals for the boredom capitols of the world.
Memphis is just another big seedy town with horrid, hot, humid climate.
Fayetteville is the best of the bunch to my mind, its outstanding feature is it is home to Walmart.

6. Fayetteville, Arkansas - 86.1

7. Memphis, Tennessee - 86.6

8. Ardmore,

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2196444/Three-Big-Apple-boroug hs-10-expensive-places-live-America-Texas-towns-cheapest.html#ixzz25C4 Cl9Ea
 
2012-09-01 02:02:50 AM
ITT: people in flyover states insult people in coastal states & vice versa
 
2012-09-01 02:04:49 AM

basemetal: Don't get any ideas, we don't want you here.

/keep flying over


give an amen to that.
 
2012-09-01 02:05:00 AM
New York is the part-time or full-time home to 75% of America's rich, just as Toronto is home to 75% of Canada's rich. Success breeds success, so from the earliest days of colonization, the rich agricultural resource, naviagable rivers, and temperate climate gave the future super-metropolis that stretches from Boston, MA to Richmond, VA a head start on development. The same sort of advantages favoured California on the West Coast.

With all the money comes vast opportunities for cultural, education, wealth, or simply living the cheap but easy life of the hipster with a monthly cheque from his or her parents in some more comfortable but less exciting prosperous place like, oh, let's say, Grosse Pointe, MI.

New York is expensive, but it is rich, like London, like Paris, like Switzerland. If only it had good weather it would be more densely populated than Hong Kong. The low cost cities on the map, you will notice, are at the edges of the Great Central desert where the population of entire states is smaller than the populations of small or mid-sized cities and where the tracery of straight grids of roads make America at night look like two vast cities connected by thinly-populated suburbs. This is where the westward expansion of America hit a glitch. You can basically see the outline of the America of 1823 even today, in the form of population imbalance and night lighting.

It is, as a rule, better to be a small worm in the Big Apple if you have any ambition or talent or advantages because despite the sky-high cost of living, you will be making sky-high money if you are competitive. If not, you can always move out. The city will not care in the least because it's always full of new victims and new predators living large. It's a jungle out there, man. But jungles are vibrant and exciting and noisy and rich in diversity and opportunities. Some people just prefer deserts and a lot of people really don't have any choice so they prefer sour grapes to admiting that they are too stupid, or sickly, or old, or cowardly to move to a place where nobody wants to know your name.
 
2012-09-01 02:06:46 AM

mr lawson: right now the most expensive place for housing is in Williston, ND.
That's right, North Dakota!


Holy shiat $1700 a month for a storage shed!
Just WOW!
 
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