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(Boing Boing)   Neil Armstrong's reoccurring nightmare for two years before Apollo 11 launch? Not being able to get off the stage   (boingboing.net ) divider line 41
    More: Hero, Neil Armstrong, EVA, Apollo missions  
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3328 clicks; posted to Geek » on 31 Aug 2012 at 11:36 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-31 08:50:11 AM  
Hilarious. Ha. Can't stop laughing, subby. Busting a gut here.


Really.
 
2012-08-31 09:42:57 AM  
I'm sure there was a plan B for that situation. Like a back door or something.
 
2012-08-31 09:53:21 AM  
I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon. Worse yet, imagine being Michael Collins; you're floating around, waiting for them to get done doing what they're doing.....only you find out they can't get off the moon and you have to go back to Earth. Alone. Could you blame the guy if later on down the road, he ate a gun?

Fortunately none of that happened, and all them have had good, long lives to spend with friends and family.
 
2012-08-31 10:47:34 AM  
img407.imageshack.us

What kind of human foot is supposed to fit in these shoes?

And the clasps shown here weren't even made until the early 1980's.

This is scary.
 
2012-08-31 11:44:37 AM  

Godscrack: [img407.imageshack.us image 409x503]

What kind of human foot is supposed to fit in these shoes?

And the clasps shown here weren't even made until the early 1980's.

This is scary.


You've never worn snow/ski boots?

Well, I haven't but even I can tell it's not much different and not freak out over something meaningless like you.
 
2012-08-31 11:47:56 AM  

Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon. Worse yet, imagine being Michael Collins; you're floating around, waiting for them to get done doing what they're doing.....only you find out they can't get off the moon and you have to go back to Earth. Alone. Could you blame the guy if later on down the road, he ate a gun?

Fortunately none of that happened, and all them have had good, long lives to spend with friends and family.


NASA put a lot of thought into the engine and systems for leaving the moon.
It was a fairly simple yet redundant rig using extremely nasty chemicals, guaranteed to burn once mixed.
Ironically, the switch to kickstart it is what almost turned out to be their undoing.

I think the chances of them being stuck were a lot lower than the chance of exploding on the return flight. Altho anything is game to happen on such a groundbreaking mission.
 
2012-08-31 11:48:23 AM  

Godscrack: [img407.imageshack.us image 409x503]

What kind of human foot is supposed to fit in these shoes?

And the clasps shown here weren't even made until the early 1980's.

This is scary.


www.sciencephoto.com

You trollin'.

Actually, it's kinda interesting, because these fit over top of other boots. The space-boots were more like galoshas.
 
2012-08-31 12:06:02 PM  

Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon.


Some have said that they would likely start walking and investigating until their air ran out. But they couldn't have done that. In preparing to lift off, they connected up to the on-board life support systems and tossed their PLS backpacks and other superfluous mass out the hatch. They wouldn't be able to get down to the ground and hook up everything before needing to already be hooked up. Accordingly, had the ascent engine failed, they were stuck on-board.

We do know what Nixon would have said.
 
2012-08-31 12:23:20 PM  
img38.picoodle.com
 
2012-08-31 12:29:05 PM  

way south: Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon. Worse yet, imagine being Michael Collins; you're floating around, waiting for them to get done doing what they're doing.....only you find out they can't get off the moon and you have to go back to Earth. Alone. Could you blame the guy if later on down the road, he ate a gun?

Fortunately none of that happened, and all them have had good, long lives to spend with friends and family.

NASA put a lot of thought into the engine and systems for leaving the moon.
It was a fairly simple yet redundant rig using extremely nasty chemicals, guaranteed to burn once mixed.
Ironically, the switch to kickstart it is what almost turned out to be their undoing.

I think the chances of them being stuck were a lot lower than the chance of exploding on the return flight. Altho anything is game to happen on such a groundbreaking mission.


HopScotchNSoda: Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon.

Some have said that they would likely start walking and investigating until their air ran out. But they couldn't have done that. In preparing to lift off, they connected up to the on-board life support systems and tossed their PLS backpacks and other superfluous mass out the hatch. They wouldn't be able to get down to the ground and hook up everything before needing to already be hooked up. Accordingly, had the ascent engine failed, they were stuck on-board.

We do know what Nixon would have said.


"AROOOOO."
 
2012-08-31 12:40:04 PM  

HopScotchNSoda: We do know what Nixon would have said.


Finally, a proper use of the word "epic" :
"but our heroes are epic men of flesh and blood. "
 
2012-08-31 12:44:40 PM  

Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon.


I thought they had suicide pills for stuff like that.

/or is that an urban legend?
 
2012-08-31 12:46:55 PM  

HopScotchNSoda: We do know what Nixon would have said.



"You won't have those guys to kick around anymore"?

img16.imageshack.us
 
2012-08-31 12:49:23 PM  
If anyone's curious about the pen quip

How a Fisher Space Pen Helped Armstrong and Aldrin Return from the Moon

It's a story that for many weeks was not circulated outside the inner circles of the U.S. Space Program: the Fisher Space Pen helped the original Moon-landing astronauts, Neil Armstrong and Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, get back to Earth.

A spokesman for NASA recounted the story to Paul C. Fisher, whose company manufactured the pen.

When about to leave the moon, and the astronauts were climbing back into the Lunar Module, the life support backpack on one of the astronauts brushed against the plastic arming switch and broke it. The switch was to have activated the LM's engines for the module's rendezvous with the mother spacecraft.

Aldrin informed Houston's Space Center by radio. A Scientist went to work on the problem immediately by breaking the plastic switch on a duplicate module and then studying the possibility of reaching a tiny metal strip inside the switch.

The strip had to be flipped over to one side to activate the LM engine, but Ground Control knew the astronauts had dispensed with practically all tools in the interest of less weight. But the astronauts still had their Space Pens, so they were advised to retract the point and use the hollow end of the pen to activate the inside switch. Then, Aldrin used his Space Pen to flick the switch's inner workings. He and Armstrong were lifted from the moon to the Apollo Space Ship for return to earth.

The story came out after John McLeish, a NASA public relations official, was quarantined with Armstrong and Aldrin upon the Astronauts' return from their space trip. McLeish told Fisher of the emergency on the moon, related to him by the astronauts. "If it hadn't been for Fisher Space Pens, the astronauts, Armstrong and Aldrin, might still be up there on the Moon."

The early astronauts used pencils for note taking because there were no Space Pens and no other pens would work in space. With the astronauts in mind, Fisher developed what he called his "Space Pen," a pen that would write under weightless conditions and in the vacuum of space.
 
2012-08-31 12:50:23 PM  

Burr: Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon.

I thought they had suicide pills for stuff like that.

/or is that an urban legend?


Also, they probably would have made their own Earth, with blackjack and hookers!
 
2012-08-31 12:55:18 PM  

gopher321: Hilarious. Ha. Can't stop laughing, subby. Busting a gut here.

Really.


Lighten up, Nancy... it was pretty funny.
 
2012-08-31 01:00:44 PM  

Burr: Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon.

I thought they had suicide pills for stuff like that.

/or is that an urban legend?


Pretty sure you don't need pills to kill yourself quickly in space.
 
2012-08-31 01:03:43 PM  

hinten: I'm sure there was a plan B for that situation. Like a back door or something.


I assume they had a broom handle to shove him out with.
 
2012-08-31 01:11:42 PM  

Nem Wan: Pretty sure you don't need pills to kill yourself quickly in space.


While they would want to be quick, I'm pretty sure "painlessly" was their #1 concern.
 
2012-08-31 01:14:38 PM  

Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon. Worse yet, imagine being Michael Collins; you're floating around, waiting for them to get done doing what they're doing.....only you find out they can't get off the moon and you have to go back to Earth. Alone. Could you blame the guy if later on down the road, he ate a gun?

Fortunately none of that happened, and all them have had good, long lives to spend with friends and family.


I would imagine they would have figured out how to make eggs from their tissue, start a colony of Moon People and then attack Earth for leaving them up there.
 
2012-08-31 01:36:58 PM  

gopher321: Hilarious. Ha. Can't stop laughing, subby. Busting a gut here.


Really.


The whole "faked moon landing" and "soundstage" bit wasn't funny when it started. It's old now. Subby should FOAD and DIAF.
 
2012-08-31 01:45:29 PM  
NEAL, TO HIMSELF
... That's one small step for a man, One giant leap for mankind.

Too quick, needs pacing

That's one small step for a man...

BEAT

... one giant leap for mankind.

Perfect.

NEAL STEPS OFF THE LAST RUNG

(.. deep breath, it's go time, these words will live forever )

That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.

FFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU
 
2012-08-31 02:02:49 PM  

indarwinsshadow: If anyone's curious about the pen quip

How a Fisher Space Pen Helped Armstrong and Aldrin Return from the Moon

It's a story that for many weeks was not circulated outside the inner circles of the U.S. Space Program: the Fisher Space Pen helped the original Moon-landing astronauts, Neil Armstrong and Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, get back to Earth.

A spokesman for NASA recounted the story to Paul C. Fisher, whose company manufactured the pen.

When about to leave the moon, and the astronauts were climbing back into the Lunar Module, the life support backpack on one of the astronauts brushed against the plastic arming switch and broke it. The switch was to have activated the LM's engines for the module's rendezvous with the mother spacecraft.

Aldrin informed Houston's Space Center by radio. A Scientist went to work on the problem immediately by breaking the plastic switch on a duplicate module and then studying the possibility of reaching a tiny metal strip inside the switch.

The strip had to be flipped over to one side to activate the LM engine, but Ground Control knew the astronauts had dispensed with practically all tools in the interest of less weight. But the astronauts still had their Space Pens, so they were advised to retract the point and use the hollow end of the pen to activate the inside switch. Then, Aldrin used his Space Pen to flick the switch's inner workings. He and Armstrong were lifted from the moon to the Apollo Space Ship for return to earth.

The story came out after John McLeish, a NASA public relations official, was quarantined with Armstrong and Aldrin upon the Astronauts' return from their space trip. McLeish told Fisher of the emergency on the moon, related to him by the astronauts. "If it hadn't been for Fisher Space Pens, the astronauts, Armstrong and Aldrin, might still be up there on the Moon."

The early astronauts used pencils for note taking because there were no Space Pens and no other pens would work in space. With the astronauts in min ...


Apparently, Buzz Aldrin preferred to use felt-tip pens, not the Fisher Space Pen (which is a ball-point), and Aldrin used a felt-tip instead of a Space Pen to activate that circuit breaker.
 
2012-08-31 02:50:03 PM  

Burr

I thought they had suicide pills for stuff like that.

/or is that an urban legend?
it's Hollywood bullsh*t. In "Lost Moon", Jim Lovell debunks it, calls it a cowards way out, and lists a few easy to accomplish things that would have offed them in seconds no pills required.
 
2012-08-31 03:52:25 PM  

OnlyM3: it's Hollywood bullsh*t. In "Lost Moon", Jim Lovell debunks it, calls it a cowards way out, and lists a few easy to accomplish things that would have offed them in seconds no pills required.


And Carl Sagan called him a liar.

Bottom line is that swallowing a pill and going to sleep is a far more palatable suicide option for most folks than, say, death by rapid decompression or CO2 poisoning, each of which can potentially prolong suffering for several terrifying minutes. Thankfully, no American ever had to resort to any such extreme measures, so it's pretty much a moot point.
 
2012-08-31 04:04:09 PM  

OnlyM3: offed them in seconds no pills required.


Time is relative, especially when you dying in an excruciating way.
 
2012-08-31 04:27:16 PM  
I feel like something else happened during the moon landing but I can't remember...
 
2012-08-31 05:01:39 PM  

wmoonfox: OnlyM3: it's Hollywood bullsh*t. In "Lost Moon", Jim Lovell debunks it, calls it a cowards way out, and lists a few easy to accomplish things that would have offed them in seconds no pills required.

And Carl Sagan called him a liar.

Bottom line is that swallowing a pill and going to sleep is a far more palatable suicide option for most folks than, say, death by rapid decompression or CO2 poisoning, each of which can potentially prolong suffering for several terrifying minutes. Thankfully, no American ever had to resort to any such extreme measures, so it's pretty much a moot point.


wmoonfox: OnlyM3: it's Hollywood bullsh*t. In "Lost Moon", Jim Lovell debunks it, calls it a cowards way out, and lists a few easy to accomplish things that would have offed them in seconds no pills required.

And Carl Sagan called him a liar.

Bottom line is that swallowing a pill and going to sleep is a far more palatable suicide option for most folks than, say, death by rapid decompression or CO2 poisoning, each of which can potentially prolong suffering for several terrifying minutes. Thankfully, no American ever had to resort to any such extreme measures, so it's pretty much a moot point.


Actually, Hypoxia is a known killer because you don't notice the effects until its too late.
As for exposure to vacuum, there was a test incident where a suit failed and the operator survived.

In his words, he felt his saliva bubble for a moment and then blacked out.
I doubt you could get that much more painless.

/In zero gravity they were always unsure how drugs would work.
/Given a choice between a known and an unknown, I wager they'd have just popped the hatch.
 
2012-08-31 05:26:38 PM  

hinten: I'm sure there was a plan B for that situation. Like a back door or something.


There was...cyanide capsules (if rumours are to be believed) and a lovely speech written by William Safire and read on national television by Richard Nixon which would have been basically an announcement the astronauts were marooned on the moon and would die there followed by a "burial at space".

No, they didn't have a plan B. OPTIMISTIC chances of them getting OFF the moon were all of fifty percent (as famously recounted by Neil Armstrong's wife, who actually thought at first NASA had far shiattier odds). It is pretty much through the blessings of science, engineering, and Macgyvering that they went there and made it back at all, and we should be damned proud we did it and damned ashamed that we pretty much walked away from it after Apollo 17 because "moon missions were too hard and too expensive".
 
2012-08-31 05:55:01 PM  

Great Porn Dragon: hinten: I'm sure there was a plan B for that situation. Like a back door or something.

There was...cyanide capsules (if rumours are to be believed) and a lovely speech written by William Safire and read on national television by Richard Nixon which would have been basically an announcement the astronauts were marooned on the moon and would die there followed by a "burial at space".

No, they didn't have a plan B. OPTIMISTIC chances of them getting OFF the moon were all of fifty percent (as famously recounted by Neil Armstrong's wife, who actually thought at first NASA had far shiattier odds). It is pretty much through the blessings of science, engineering, and Macgyvering that they went there and made it back at all, and we should be damned proud we did it and damned ashamed that we pretty much walked away from it after Apollo 17 because "moon missions were too hard and too expensive".


I think the feeling was also, "Been there, done that, got the t-shirt." Once we beat the Soviets to the moon, and did it more than once, the novelty wore off. Especially when it became apparent that no one else was going to try.
 
2012-08-31 09:12:57 PM  

indarwinsshadow: "If it hadn't been for Fisher Space Pens, the astronauts, Armstrong and Aldrin, might still be up there on the Moon."


Kind of a morbid thought but what would the bodies look like if this happened? I would be kinda creepy if they didn't decay due to lack of oxygen or something.
 
2012-08-31 10:49:55 PM  
He gave a detailed answer about the hypergolic fuel mixing system for the lunar module. Rather than an ignition system, they had two substances that would ignite upon contact. Instead of an electric pump, he wished he had a big simple lever to mechanically initiate mixing.

That seemed a bit odd to me at first. So, I asked if he gave that answer because it really was the most likely point of failure, or because it symbolizes a vivid nightmare - having completed the moon mission, pushing the button... and the engines just wont start.

He responded that he had dreams about that for two years prior to the launch.


I'd have guessed it was more like, "I'm there on the surface of the Moon, and it's time to lift off to rejoin the Command Module, so I push the button for the hypergolic fuel mixing system, and the Ascent Stage doesn't budge, because we don't have enough thrust to lift my enormous solid steel balls."
 
2012-08-31 11:07:22 PM  

saturn badger: indarwinsshadow: "If it hadn't been for Fisher Space Pens, the astronauts, Armstrong and Aldrin, might still be up there on the Moon."

Kind of a morbid thought but what would the bodies look like if this happened? I would be kinda creepy if they didn't decay due to lack of oxygen or something.


I'll go out on a limb to say that once the electricity ran out, the interior of that capsule would oscillate between cooking and freezing.
So they might either end up in some kind of freeze dried mummified state, or turned to a pile of mess from all the temperature shifting.
 
2012-08-31 11:09:17 PM  

wmoonfox: OnlyM3: it's Hollywood bullsh*t. In "Lost Moon", Jim Lovell debunks it, calls it a cowards way out, and lists a few easy to accomplish things that would have offed them in seconds no pills required.

And Carl Sagan called him a liar.

Bottom line is that swallowing a pill and going to sleep is a far more palatable suicide option for most folks than, say, death by rapid decompression or CO2 poisoning, each of which can potentially prolong suffering for several terrifying minutes. Thankfully, no American ever had to resort to any such extreme measures, so it's pretty much a moot point.


Lovell flew on Apollo 8 and Apollo 13. Sagan never went above the stratosphere. Much as I admire Sagan, Lovell is more credible, especially given the circumstances of Apollo 13.
 
2012-09-01 08:09:21 AM  

Burr: Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon.

I thought they had suicide pills for stuff like that.

/or is that an urban legend?


For once, Snopes has failed me here, since I feel sure they've covered this (how could they not?), but I'm not finding it there. As I recall from various things I've read (including the current WP article), this is officially not true. That is, NASA says it's not true. And at least one Apollo astronaut, Jim Lovell, says the same. The only reputable source I know of who disagreed was Carl Sagan, who included it in 'Contact,' claiming it was common practice. Sagan had done extensive research for the book, so one tends to be confident in his claims therein. (E.g., that TV signals from the 1936 Olympics could have made it to Vega by now.) Tom Hanks' 'From the Earth the Moon' documentary cycle depicted the Apollo programme in excruciatingly accurate detail, and I don't recall this ever came up there; he worked closely with many NASA people, including former astronauts, to create this.

So I'd say it's either not true, and Sagan was misinformed, or it's an official secret and Sagan was the only knowledgeable person rude enough to expose it (or perhaps thought no one would take it as given fact in that fictional context).
 
2012-09-01 08:19:59 AM  

saturn badger: indarwinsshadow: "If it hadn't been for Fisher Space Pens, the astronauts, Armstrong and Aldrin, might still be up there on the Moon."

Kind of a morbid thought but what would the bodies look like if this happened? I would be kinda creepy if they didn't decay due to lack of oxygen or something.


This has been studied in some SF over the years. Apparently, you'd see a kind of slow dessication, due to loss of water and air. The suits and vehicles were not tombs, after all, but temporary containers, and could not hold all that in indefinitely. So I guess they would have been mummified, more or less.
 
2012-09-01 08:24:23 AM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Burr: Coco LaFemme: I don't want to try and imagine what either Armstrong or Aldrin would have said/done if it had become apparent they were never getting off the moon.

I thought they had suicide pills for stuff like that.

/or is that an urban legend?

For once, Snopes has failed me here, since I feel sure they've covered this (how could they not?), but I'm not finding it there. As I recall from various things I've read (including the current WP article), this is officially not true. That is, NASA says it's not true. And at least one Apollo astronaut, Jim Lovell, says the same. The only reputable source I know of who disagreed was Carl Sagan, who included it in 'Contact,' claiming it was common practice. Sagan had done extensive research for the book, so one tends to be confident in his claims therein. (E.g., that TV signals from the 1936 Olympics could have made it to Vega by now.) Tom Hanks' 'From the Earth the Moon' documentary cycle depicted the Apollo programme in excruciatingly accurate detail, and I don't recall this ever came up there; he worked closely with many NASA people, including former astronauts, to create this.

So I'd say it's either not true, and Sagan was misinformed, or it's an official secret and Sagan was the only knowledgeable person rude enough to expose it (or perhaps thought no one would take it as given fact in that fictional context).


If I recall, the military was in the habit of giving suicide pills to spy plane pilots. This was one of the things the Russians confiscated from Gary Powers when he was shot down.
I also recall that all of the Apollo astronauts spare one (Harrison Schmitt) were career military men.

it's possible that Sagan presumed a common practice in the military would carry over to spaceflight. NASA would have every reason to avoid talking about it, if it did.
 
2012-09-01 11:35:49 AM  

way south: I also recall that all of the Apollo astronauts spare one (Harrison Schmitt) were career military men.


Dude. WTF? You are the third guy in this thread to be apparently unaware -- despite all of the discussion in this thread about it -- that Neal Armstrong was a civilian. Rusty Schweickart (Apollo 9) was a civilian. So was Elliot See who crashed and died before he could make it to space. The astronauts who served aboard Skylab were Apollo astronauts, hired at the same time as Schmitt (also, Skylab was the result of the Apollo Applications Program, used Apollo command & service modules, and Skylab itself was a re-purposed Saturn third stage); of those six, only one was in the military.

Armstrong was a veteran of the Navy but got out after the Korean War; he then resigned his reserve commission a few years after he left active duty. He was a totally civilian test pilot for Bell Aircraft when he applied to NASA. Schweickart was in the National Guard for seven years, and See in the Navy for three, before becoming astronauts. Three of Schmitt's cohort had also served briefly, years before becoming astronauts.
 
2012-09-01 07:41:02 PM  

dittybopper: indarwinsshadow: If anyone's curious about the pen quip

How a Fisher Space Pen Helped Armstrong and Aldrin Return from the Moon

It's a story that for many weeks was not circulated outside the inner circles of the U.S. Space Program: the Fisher Space Pen helped the original Moon-landing astronauts, Neil Armstrong and Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, get back to Earth.

A spokesman for NASA recounted the story to Paul C. Fisher, whose company manufactured the pen.

When about to leave the moon, and the astronauts were climbing back into the Lunar Module, the life support backpack on one of the astronauts brushed against the plastic arming switch and broke it. The switch was to have activated the LM's engines for the module's rendezvous with the mother spacecraft.

Aldrin informed Houston's Space Center by radio. A Scientist went to work on the problem immediately by breaking the plastic switch on a duplicate module and then studying the possibility of reaching a tiny metal strip inside the switch.

The strip had to be flipped over to one side to activate the LM engine, but Ground Control knew the astronauts had dispensed with practically all tools in the interest of less weight. But the astronauts still had their Space Pens, so they were advised to retract the point and use the hollow end of the pen to activate the inside switch. Then, Aldrin used his Space Pen to flick the switch's inner workings. He and Armstrong were lifted from the moon to the Apollo Space Ship for return to earth.

The story came out after John McLeish, a NASA public relations official, was quarantined with Armstrong and Aldrin upon the Astronauts' return from their space trip. McLeish told Fisher of the emergency on the moon, related to him by the astronauts. "If it hadn't been for Fisher Space Pens, the astronauts, Armstrong and Aldrin, might still be up there on the Moon."

The early astronauts used pencils for note taking because there were no Space Pens and no other pens would work in space. With the ...


The only thing that could have made reading that any better was hearing the "BEEP" after each transmission. Thanks subby.
 
2012-09-01 11:09:59 PM  

Coco LaFemme: Great Porn Dragon: hinten: I'm sure there was a plan B for that situation. Like a back door or something.

There was...cyanide capsules (if rumours are to be believed) and a lovely speech written by William Safire and read on national television by Richard Nixon which would have been basically an announcement the astronauts were marooned on the moon and would die there followed by a "burial at space".

No, they didn't have a plan B. OPTIMISTIC chances of them getting OFF the moon were all of fifty percent (as famously recounted by Neil Armstrong's wife, who actually thought at first NASA had far shiattier odds). It is pretty much through the blessings of science, engineering, and Macgyvering that they went there and made it back at all, and we should be damned proud we did it and damned ashamed that we pretty much walked away from it after Apollo 17 because "moon missions were too hard and too expensive".

I think the feeling was also, "Been there, done that, got the t-shirt." Once we beat the Soviets to the moon, and did it more than once, the novelty wore off. Especially when it became apparent that no one else was going to try.


It still bugs me that there was complete hardware for three more missions (or at least one more if you want Skylab) already built yet mothballed. I've read that the incremental cost of flying those cancelled missions vs. actual post-Apollo NASA spending would have been merely tens of millions of dollars because almost everything was already paid for and the people needed to fly it were going to be there anyway. (Recall the end of the shuttle program when NASA added a final mission and announced it would fly "regardless" of whether Congress specifically funded it or not.) The only justification for quitting Apollo when we did that I have slight sympathy for was safety and "quitting while we were ahead", so far as no one had died during a mission yet.
 
2012-09-02 06:37:15 PM  
wmoonfox Smartest Funniest


OnlyM3: it's Hollywood bullsh*t. In "Lost Moon", Jim Lovell debunks it, calls it a cowards way out, and lists a few easy to accomplish things that would have offed them in seconds no pills required.

And Carl Sagan called him a liar.


citation-please.jpg



way south

....Actually, Hypoxia is a known killer because you don't notice the effects until its too late.
As for exposure to vacuum, there was a test incident where a suit failed and the operator survived.

In his words, he felt his saliva bubble for a moment and then blacked out.
I doubt you could get that much more painless.

^ This.
 
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