If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Fox News)   The U.S. State Department tells employees to stop using common phrases such as "hold down the fort" and "rule of thumb" because they are culturally and racially insensitive   (foxnews.com) divider line 209
    More: Asinine, State Department, U.S., State Department tells  
•       •       •

8292 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Aug 2012 at 2:18 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



209 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-08-31 03:15:52 AM
 
2012-08-31 03:16:46 AM

Gunther: timujin: Also... I wonder if forts existed before or outside of the need to protect ones self from the Native Americans?

I.m pretty sure the Romans had forts in Germania. It's probably something you want whenever you're settling somewhere where there's

hostile natives.
 
2012-08-31 03:18:58 AM
Thank goodness "You're a farking idiot" was not on the list.
 
2012-08-31 03:20:07 AM
i308.photobucket.com

Come ON, what totally innocent term are we gonna pretend is racist next?? "Porch monkey"??
 
2012-08-31 03:20:27 AM
*skims article* WTF?

img227.imageshack.us
 
2012-08-31 03:21:49 AM
Kyrgan~

Well
 
2012-08-31 03:24:54 AM
What about someone asking what the "Penal Codes" are in a particular country.
 
2012-08-31 03:27:06 AM
I wonder if they got the idea that the "rule of thumb" is a reference to safe wife beating from Boondock Saints? Turns out a rule of thumb is literally using your thumb as a measuring device, like a ruler.
 
2012-08-31 03:28:42 AM
A few months ago I told bible thumper at work , who has the attention span of a gnat, to "pull her head out of her ass and pay attention to what she is doing". Because she can always manage to fark up the most simple task. Her response to that was shock and a speech that had something to do about a womans body being a sacred thing blah blah blah. Then I rolled my eyes and walked out mid speech. Im suprised Im not in "sensitivity training".
 
2012-08-31 03:28:51 AM
Regardless of the origination of some of our idioms, people are going to think what they're going to think. Sometimes you're gonna say something in-offensive and someone's still going to be offended. Not because of what you said but because that other person's a dick. I don't think many injuns ever gave thought to the expression "hold down the fort" as anything except the "take charge" expression that it is, unless they're addicted to John Wayne movies. The State Dept has better things to do (I hope) than play Grammar Czar Of The English Language (GCOTEL)
 
2012-08-31 03:36:31 AM
As president of the local chapter of Flatulence Anonymous, I find the above posts referencing "hold the fart" to be discrimanatory, and I seek immediate damages and a large can of beans as compensation.
 
2012-08-31 03:41:13 AM
Hey America, it's kinda funny when you do meaningless shiat like this, but please bear in mind that you stupidness rubs off on stupid people in the rest of the world.

I have heard someone calling black people african-american - and I live in Denmark... the blacks in question had NEVER been to the americas.

And we call them "neger" (comes from latin "niger" which means black). But of course, this has somehow become something that somebody (stupid white people) think is offensive to black people.
So now there are proponents in our society ousting the word "neger" as an offensive slur!

And I would like to point out, that the word "neger" has never been used as a slur in Denmark!
We had the exact same N-word you americans have (spelling and all), but it sort of fell out of use in the 70's, I think. (we didn't import our slaves back in the day, so the black people here came on their own accord, so we've never had the same tension as you have in America)

So what do those uneasy with the word "neger" want us to use?
Of course, they want us to use the word "sort" which is Danish for - you probably guessed it already - black.

So "neger", meaning black, is being replaced by another word meaning black. Brilliant!
And it's all out of misguided stupidity heavily inspired by what you Americans do.

So please contain you stupidity and quell the fark out it, please!
 
2012-08-31 03:43:32 AM
So now we know what Hillary has been up to.
 
2012-08-31 03:46:51 AM
Oh wow another scathing indictment by Fox News against our favored administration. I'm quaking in my farking boots.
 
2012-08-31 03:47:20 AM
This is just a more covert form of Newspeak, really. It's a way of getting people to worry about the words being used, instead of the intent being conveyed. Sure, there are plenty of words that, in some contexts, are offensive; but those exact same words in OTHER contexts are perfectly innocuous.

The word "chink" is offensive if you are talking about, or to, a Chinese person, but "a chink in one's armor" has NOTHING to do with ethnic slurs. "Slope" is an awful phrase used when referring to someone from Vietnam, but absolutely essential when determining the "degree of slope" in architecture. It is wrong to call a black person a "spook", but not so much when you're talking about a spy.

Should people be more precise in their speech and writing, of course. Should we attempt to avoid racist, sexist and demeaning phrases, absolutely. But if we have to pre-censor our everyday speech because some words can be seen as offensive in some contexts, then we're just doing internally what the Ministry of Truth was doing in "1984": "The whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought...In the end, we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it. Every concept that can ever be needed will be expressed by exactly one word, with its meaning rigidly defined and all subsidiary meanings rubbed out and forgotten."

And it doesn't matter whether the push comes from a desire to circumscribe human thought for evil intentions, or to prevent the thoughtless use of hurtful words. The end result is the same. People can't talk freely, and who do you think that will benefit in the long run?
 
2012-08-31 03:48:48 AM

Gyrfalcon: This is just a more covert form of Newspeak, really. It's a way of getting people to worry about the words being used, instead of the intent being conveyed. Sure, there are plenty of words that, in some contexts, are offensive; but those exact same words in OTHER contexts are perfectly innocuous.

The word "chink" is offensive if you are talking about, or to, a Chinese person, but "a chink in one's armor" has NOTHING to do with ethnic slurs. "Slope" is an awful phrase used when referring to someone from Vietnam, but absolutely essential when determining the "degree of slope" in architecture. It is wrong to call a black person a "spook", but not so much when you're talking about a spy.

Should people be more precise in their speech and writing, of course. Should we attempt to avoid racist, sexist and demeaning phrases, absolutely. But if we have to pre-censor our everyday speech because some words can be seen as offensive in some contexts, then we're just doing internally what the Ministry of Truth was doing in "1984": "The whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought...In the end, we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it. Every concept that can ever be needed will be expressed by exactly one word, with its meaning rigidly defined and all subsidiary meanings rubbed out and forgotten."

And it doesn't matter whether the push comes from a desire to circumscribe human thought for evil intentions, or to prevent the thoughtless use of hurtful words. The end result is the same. People can't talk freely, and who do you think that will benefit in the long run?


Yeah but you know what?

You're still speaking through a filter brought to us by Fox News.

What's really going on, I have to wonder.
 
2012-08-31 03:51:20 AM
John Robinson should change his name as it might be offensive.

John Robinson was incremental in the acquisition of the Mayflower to invade North America and take it from the local Indian population. John Robinson was a pastor in the Church of England and that may offend atheists. John Robinson was also a Midwestern serial killer and the mention of his name may offend the families of those he killed.
 
2012-08-31 03:52:38 AM

Drubell: Don't use sayings or phrases if you're writing things that might be viewed internationally because they're just not going to get it and wonder what the hell you're talking about. Some writer I know actually used "hold down the fort" in an article recently and some British people were asking what this even meant.


I work in Australia and I had a similar issue recently as well - I believe the term I used was something like "level a charge", which evidently is an American idiom.

I had no idea, because... well, being American, it's a common enough phrase.
 
2012-08-31 03:55:04 AM
I just wish the TSA agents would stop referring to me as a pig in a poke.
 
2012-08-31 03:59:37 AM

Gyrfalcon: And it doesn't matter whether the push comes from a desire to circumscribe human thought for evil intentions, or to prevent the thoughtless use of hurtful words. The end result is the same. People can't talk freely, and who do you think that will benefit in the long run?


Yes, diplomats being instructed to speak diplomatically is exactly like trying to control a population's thoughts using language (which itself was one of the more ludicrous elements of Orwell's already somewhat far-fetched dystopia).

If you don't want to mind how you speak, don't start a career where minding how you speak is a critically important skill.
 
2012-08-31 04:00:48 AM

I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: I just wish the TSA agents would stop referring to me as a pig in a poke.


I'm guessing it's the assless chaps.
 
2012-08-31 04:00:50 AM
We really need some innovators in the area of racially/culturally offensive words and phrases. Something to liven up the language. There just isn't enough outrage these days.

Does outrage even mean anything anymore?
 
2012-08-31 04:06:10 AM
This thread leaves me feeling gypped.

Can someone post a link to the real rule of thumb?
 
2012-08-31 04:09:02 AM

Sum Dum Gai: Gyrfalcon: And it doesn't matter whether the push comes from a desire to circumscribe human thought for evil intentions, or to prevent the thoughtless use of hurtful words. The end result is the same. People can't talk freely, and who do you think that will benefit in the long run?

Yes, diplomats being instructed to speak diplomatically is exactly like trying to control a population's thoughts using language (which itself was one of the more ludicrous elements of Orwell's already somewhat far-fetched dystopia).

If you don't want to mind how you speak, don't start a career where minding how you speak is a critically important skill.


I'm guessing you missed the part where I said this: Should people be more precise in their speech and writing, of course. Should we attempt to avoid racist, sexist and demeaning phrases, absolutely. I said that for a reason. Diplomats shouldn't be using American slang in their daily work routine, duh.

That doesn't invalidate anything else I said, now, does it?
 
2012-08-31 04:25:00 AM
So is the government going to create a new agency to police our phrase usage?
 
2012-08-31 04:26:49 AM
The Dutch are the cheapest, stingiest farkers on Earth. Fact. Germans get 2nd place.
 
2012-08-31 04:27:41 AM

Ebbelwoi: The Dutch are the cheapest, stingiest farkers on Earth. Fact. Germans get 2nd place.


You forgot the Jews.
 
2012-08-31 04:32:21 AM

robohobo: Ebbelwoi: The Dutch are the cheapest, stingiest farkers on Earth. Fact. Germans get 2nd place.

You forgot the Jews.


You forgot Poland.
 
2012-08-31 04:34:11 AM

Lionel Mandrake: He singled out another phrase, "Going Dutch," as a "negative stereotype portraying the Dutch as cheap."

Being cheap is just one of the many despicable attributes of the Dutch


My stepfather is Dutch. The are also by and large very racist.
 
2012-08-31 04:39:51 AM
GranoblasticMan


"You forgot Poland."


Zey too are on ze list.
 
2012-08-31 04:41:42 AM

Drubell: Don't use sayings or phrases if you're writing things that might be viewed internationally because they're just not going to get it and wonder what the hell you're talking about. Some writer I know actually used "hold down the fort" in an article recently and some British people were asking what this even meant.


We use "hold the fort", which actually makes sense (prevent the fort from being taken). Hold down the fort makes none, unless the fort is inflatable and filled with helium.
 
2012-08-31 04:42:08 AM

robohobo: Ebbelwoi: The Dutch are the cheapest, stingiest farkers on Earth. Fact. Germans get 2nd place.

You forgot the Jews.


And the Ferrengis.
 
2012-08-31 04:44:11 AM
Insert Sterling Archer talking about idioms.
 
2012-08-31 04:51:15 AM

gameshowhost: AverageAmericanGuy: Johnny Bananapeel: Nobody ever mentions the obvious "keep your cotton pickin' hands off..." when they list these sorts of offensive phrases. 

[i.imgur.com image 443x290]

how much more ofendded do you think blakc people can get?

"400 years worth of being treated like shiat" offended. But that's just an estimate.


Black people are immortal?
 
2012-08-31 04:54:26 AM

duffblue:
Black people are immortal?


No, but their playing the race card probably is.
 
2012-08-31 05:09:13 AM

Gunther: Really? I'm the first farker pedantic enough to point out it should be "hold the fort" not "hold down the fort"?

If I ask someone to "hold the fort", it's a pretty clear metaphor; there's a fort, I have to leave for a while, and I want them to stay and stop the Mongols getting in or whatever. I'm asking them to look after a specific location while I'm gone.

If I ask someone to "hold DOWN the fort"... Well that's meaningless. Why would you need to hold down a fort? Is it going to fly away? No. Some idiot just misheard the phrase one day, started using it wrong and other idiots copied him. Just stop it.


"Hold down the fort" is an American idiom. "Hold the fort" is a Britishism. I don't know which came first. Googling the expression isn't yielding anything definitive.

If you have some proof that "hold the fort" was the original expression, by all means, post it.
 
2012-08-31 05:21:13 AM

Pocket Ninja: Anybody who says "hold the fort" to you is nothing more than a lazy asshole who wants you to pick up their slack, and that's a documentable fact.


Or it's because they couldn't "hold in the fart".
 
2012-08-31 05:28:30 AM

ciberido: Gunther: Really? I'm the first farker pedantic enough to point out it should be "hold the fort" not "hold down the fort"?

If I ask someone to "hold the fort", it's a pretty clear metaphor; there's a fort, I have to leave for a while, and I want them to stay and stop the Mongols getting in or whatever. I'm asking them to look after a specific location while I'm gone.

If I ask someone to "hold DOWN the fort"... Well that's meaningless. Why would you need to hold down a fort? Is it going to fly away? No. Some idiot just misheard the phrase one day, started using it wrong and other idiots copied him. Just stop it.

"Hold down the fort" is an American idiom. "Hold the fort" is a Britishism. I don't know which came first. Googling the expression isn't yielding anything definitive.

If you have some proof that "hold the fort" was the original expression, by all means, post it.


Well, my proof is that it actually makes sense as an expression. If you'd never heard the phrase before and someone told you to "hold the fort" you could puzzle out what it meant with a little rational thinking - it's a clear metaphor for looking after a place. OTOH, "hold down the fort" is something you're gonna need explained to you, as it's as meaningless a collection of words as "spic and span" or "tit for tat".
 
2012-08-31 05:38:04 AM

DuncanMhor: Drubell: Don't use sayings or phrases if you're writing things that might be viewed internationally because they're just not going to get it and wonder what the hell you're talking about. Some writer I know actually used "hold down the fort" in an article recently and some British people were asking what this even meant.

We use "hold the fort", which actually makes sense (prevent the fort from being taken). Hold down the fort makes none, unless the fort is inflatable and filled with helium.


image.made-in-china.com

All it would take is one injun arrow to put an end to the fun and games in this place...
 
2012-08-31 05:41:04 AM
Quite a lot of popular idioms have unseemly origins. It doesn't matter as long as nobody remembers them. Jesus, why did they have to tell me that "rule of thumb" is linked to wife-beating?
 
2012-08-31 05:47:22 AM
 
2012-08-31 05:51:03 AM

TwistedFark: Drubell: Don't use sayings or phrases if you're writing things that might be viewed internationally because they're just not going to get it and wonder what the hell you're talking about. Some writer I know actually used "hold down the fort" in an article recently and some British people were asking what this even meant.

I work in Australia and I had a similar issue recently as well - I believe the term I used was something like "level a charge", which evidently is an American idiom.

I had no idea, because... well, being American, it's a common enough phrase.


Isn't it "Levy a charge" or is this something else?
 
2012-08-31 05:51:10 AM
Hey, it's close enough for government work.
 
2012-08-31 05:58:55 AM

Badfysh: Isn't it "Levy a charge" or is this something else?


I think it's "levee a charge," and it's very offensive to New Orleanders.
 
2012-08-31 06:00:01 AM

GranoblasticMan: robohobo: Ebbelwoi: The Dutch are the cheapest, stingiest farkers on Earth. Fact. Germans get 2nd place.

You forgot the Jews.

You forgot Poland.


And, the Scots.
 
2012-08-31 06:05:53 AM

Gunther: Well, my proof is that it actually makes sense as an expression. If you'd never heard the phrase before and someone told you to "hold the fort" you could puzzle out what it meant with a little rational thinking - it's a clear metaphor for looking after a place. OTOH, "hold down the fort" is something you're gonna need explained to you, as it's as meaningless a collection of words as "spic and span" or "tit for tat".


First off, my question wasn't "Which makes more sense?" but "Which one came first?"

Second, they're both extremely idiomatic. No no-native speaker is going to "figure out" what a native English speaker means by "hold the fort" or "hold down the fort."

And third, no offense, but your opinion isn't proof of anything. If the idea that "hold down the fort" is a corruption of the older "hold the fort" matters enough to you that you want to convince me it's the actual etymology, then you're going to need, y'know, actual proof, not an argument (no matter how cogent) that it "makes more sense" or is "more logical."
 
2012-08-31 06:18:45 AM

ciberido: First off, my question wasn't "Which makes more sense?" but "Which one came first?"


I don't care which comes first, though, and I'm not sure how you've come to the conclusion that my problem with "hold down the fort" is that it's too new.

I just care that "hold down the fort" doesn't make sense while "hold the fort" does. One is clearly a better saying than the other.
 
2012-08-31 06:42:06 AM
Diversity Officer... Must be one of thos "your tax dollars at work" type positions
 
2012-08-31 06:55:15 AM

Gunther: Really? I'm the first farker pedantic enough to point out it should be "hold the fort" not "hold down the fort"?

If I ask someone to "hold the fort", it's a pretty clear metaphor; there's a fort, I have to leave for a while, and I want them to stay and stop the Mongols getting in or whatever. I'm asking them to look after a specific location while I'm gone.

If I ask someone to "hold DOWN the fort"... Well that's meaningless. Why would you need to hold down a fort? Is it going to fly away? No. Some idiot just misheard the phrase one day, started using it wrong and other idiots copied him. Just stop it.


My favorite was the assemblyman who was forced to apologize for using the phrase "black hole" as in, "the mayors office is a black hole of money". Of course since the Mayor was a proud and successful African American, he was offended by this.

Then their was the guy who got into trouble for using the word nubianrdly. Look it up, it simply means cheap, and has nothing to do with the word n*ger. It's origin never had anything to due with race. It just sounds too close to n*ger.

Finally, there were the snow flakes that children made and put on the walls to celebrate winter. Any that were five or six pointed were ripped off the walls. because any five pointed snowflake could represent a Christian star, and a six pointed snowflake a Jewish one.

/sometimes I weep for my country.
 
2012-08-31 06:55:59 AM
upload.wikimedia.org

Well raise my rent....
 
Displayed 50 of 209 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report