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(Daily Mail)   After 5-year old son with a penchant for wearing dresses and skirts is picked on at school, father dons women's clothing in solidarity. "Long skirts with elasticated waistbands suit me quite well anyway"   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 172
    More: Hero, Nils Pickert, little buddy, school ages, Pippa Middleton, waistband, skirts, fingernails, solidarity  
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17828 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Aug 2012 at 4:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-08-30 03:29:43 PM
14 votes:
I believe in equality. Men should be able to wear dresses and skirts in all their ball-freedom glory, and women should be allowed to walk around topless.

And it should be OK to stare at either one.
2012-08-30 04:53:57 PM
11 votes:

jaylectricity: freedom


celticwarriorkilts.com

There is a land where a mans balls may hang free and clear.

Conventions - Dragon*Con, Comic Con , etc. I let my boys swing with the wind while i'm rocking out with my geek out.

But seriously, good on the Dad for showing unwavering love for his kid. Even if this causes more teasing , the kid knows that he's always got his Dad to back him up. That's way more support than some transgendered adults get from their parents.
2012-08-30 06:19:48 PM
9 votes:
One time at the local park, there was a bald child playing by himself and a group of other kids playing tag with one another. My son went straight over and played with the bald kid. His mom struck up a conversation w/ my wife and said her son's been battling leukemia and that our son is the first kid to play with him in a long time. He got picked on a lot at school and the other kids would chant "Baldy" at him. She broke down crying talking about it.

Every parent here who's belittling the dad for a lack of discipline in his house... it's your kids who are the assholes out on the playground, making fun of kids not only for choices within their control, but for things completely out of their control. Not to parade around on my high horse, but they learn that stuff at home. You think it's just natural and kids being kids, but it's not. They pick up cues from you and the same way you're going after this dad like a shark smelling blood in the water, they go after his kids.

As a parent, you decide what things warrant discipline and what things don't. Just because a parent feels that their son's choice to wear a dress is fine with them does not mean there's a lack of discipline in general or that the child is running the house.

I've had to deal with more than my fair share of jerk ass kids. They're never some sweet boy who likes dresses or nail polish. They're YOUR kids. Kudos to the dad and fark the rest of you.
2012-08-30 05:40:10 PM
9 votes:
I have to admit...people who feel that they have to push boundaries and challenge perceptions can seem annoying and attention whorish, especially to silly, dozy, easily frightened sheeple...

But those of you (non-trolls) who feel the need to criticize and complain and talk shiat about what a "real dad' does, or who push your various "norms" and "standards" as somehow important...

Just who the hell are you, except cowardly, fearful little turds? Why are pants such a part of your identity?
Why should what anybody wears be such an issue for you, who aren't even involved? Why the fearful reactions?


I'm 6'4, bald, bearded, and beer-bellied....pathetic reactions like I've seen here make me want to find your neighborhoods and roam the streets in full flaming drag while blowing kisses to everyone, just to scare the shiat out of y'all.
2012-08-30 06:13:16 PM
7 votes:

craig328: Or, if that was too much to follow, it's kind of like the feeling you get when you exercise some parental prerogative and save your son from being a social pariah or worse because, you know, he's only 5 f*cking years old. I guess I'm being cowardly for insisting my kids eat a well balanced meal and get to bed at a decent time too?


Not everyone is okay with seeing their kid's desires crushed by a social standard that doesn't exist for any reason particularly relevant to the modern world.

Say your kid like bananas. Now say that kid got teased at school for eating bananas. Would the correct response be to tell your kid to stop bringing the bananas to school, or would it be to tell the kid that he's gonna have to deal with a lot of small minded shaitheads through life, and that if he listens to them, he'll never become great? Yes, your kid will be teased some if he eats the bananas. But if you let him give in, the lesson he'll learn is that no matter what you like, no matter what you think, if it doesn't conform to what the dumbest morons in the class like, he should be afraid to express it.

Yes, he'll get teased. But he'll also be much, much better equipped than any of his peers to deal with it. He'll grow into himself much more fully, and will become self confident and engaged in school and society.

Difference is good. It's valuable, and it's how we learn as a society. And when you're different, it takes courage to stand up and tell the small minded where they can shove it. That courage doesn't come from nowhere, but this kid is gonna learn it.
2012-08-30 05:05:47 PM
7 votes:
My 12 year old daughter is into Iron Man and wears an Arc-Reactor shirt that lights up to school.
At times I think "I should tell her not to wear it" because 12 year old girls can be biatches and I'm scared she'll get picked on for not wearing "girly-er" clothes.
Then I think "fark them! Geek girls rule the world and this is who she is and what she loves!"
So good for her and shame on me for, even for a second, thinking otherwise!!
2012-08-30 04:53:06 PM
7 votes:

Gunny Highway: timujin: "Hey, if you and your dad aren't man enough to wear a skirt..."

It isnt clever, it is annoying.


Men were wearing skirts for hundreds of years before pants came along.
2012-08-30 04:52:54 PM
7 votes:
Or, you know, you could just dress your five-year-old in pants like the other kids so he doesn't get teased, because he's friggen five and you can make that decision.
2012-08-30 05:37:27 PM
6 votes:
Good for the dad. Haters can shut up and EABOD. What's wrong with a guy wearing a dress? Oh no, somebody is bucking societal trends! Must humiliate them so they know their place!
2012-08-30 02:21:54 PM
6 votes:

scottydoesntknow: Good for him, but that won't stop the teasing. Unfortunately, it'll probably make it worse.


that was my first thought too. My second thought was anyone who lets their 5 year old tell them how they are going to dress is an idiot.
2012-08-30 06:02:56 PM
5 votes:
Link

^A pretty good article about childhood gender fluidity. Ultimately you, as a parent have to figure out if it's worth it to shame your child out of wearing whatever they want to placate your rigid and socially-imposed notions of gender normativity. The trauma inflicted by said shaming is thousands fold the trauma the child endures from wearing a dress in public otherwise. As a parent, your choice is to either join the ranks of the judgmental populace or to be an ally in an otherwise hostile social landscape.

Food for thought. We're embarking on a new era of child rearing and gender/sexuality constructs. No one from either camp really knows what to do with it.
/Popcorn shares and such.
2012-08-30 05:53:28 PM
5 votes:

craig328: Chunky_Charlie: This is a no-brainer.

It really shouldn't be that big of a deal. Let him wear whatever the fark he wants to wear. Life is about doing what makes you happy.

It seems idiotic to me that people are so petty that they would voice an opinion on what a child is or isn't wearing, or any person for that matter.

You know what I'd bet'll make him happier than wearing a dress? How about "not getting picked on in school by the other kids for wearing a dress"?

What if picking on a sissy kid is what makes the other kids happy? Since "life is about doing what makes you happy" they're good to go, right?

I get how it OUGHT not to happen that the kid gets picked on for whatever entirely avoidable reason he's being picked on. But while dad is busy teaching him the "be your own person and fark what other people think" he's entirely skipping the "the would isn't a fair place son" lesson...and then remind him that unless space travel really takes off in the next few years, he's likely stuck on this world and ought to consider how his decisions, noble though they may be, might affect how much he enjoys his time here.


I'm no hero, no society-changing rebel, and I admit it...but tell me, what's it like to be just a straight-up coward?
2012-08-30 05:11:14 PM
5 votes:
Good age to start teaching a kid the "fark what other people think".
2012-08-30 05:07:07 PM
5 votes:

DmGdDawg: Hero tag? Try Dumbass tag.

A good father wouldn't let his five year old son dress like a girl at school or anywhere else.


I think a good father would explain that if you do something that is out of the ordinary it will attract attention. Some of the attention will be good and some will be bad. Choices have consequences and you need to learn to handle the good with the bad. If wearing dresses makes the kid happy that is great but dont expect everyone to handle the situation the exact same way. It may not be right but it is life.
2012-08-30 02:48:19 PM
5 votes:
FTA...'To this very day I'm thankful for that woman who stared at us on the street until she ran face-first into a street light. My son was roaring with laughter, and the next day he fished out a dress from the depth of his wardrobe. At first only for the weekend. Later also for nursery school.'

I loved that part.
2012-08-30 06:08:20 PM
4 votes:
You folks do realize that outside of certain anatomically specific items (such as bras), gender differences regarding clothing are purely social constructs with no actual meaning or purpose right?

Right?
2012-08-30 06:03:43 PM
4 votes:

Hagenhatesyouall: Hero tag?

HERO?

How about a farking ZERO.

Part of being a parent is to keep kids from doing stupid shiat like, say, wearing a g'damn dress to school when you're a 5 year old boy.


Part of being a responsible parent and a decent human being is teaching your kids not to be judgmental wastrels.
2012-08-30 05:50:58 PM
4 votes:
If the boy and his father are fine with it then I am too. The world has enough sports jersey-wearing blowhard fathers and sons.
2012-08-30 05:45:26 PM
4 votes:

craig328: But while dad is busy teaching him the "be your own person and fark what other people think" he's entirely skipping the "the would isn't a fair place son" lesson...


Don't you think that getting picked on for the clothes he wore pretty much accomplished teaching the "the world isn't a fair place" lesson? Or does it only work if the kid is bullied into a state of crippling fear and/or resentment, and experiences no support from anyone whatsoever? Is the lesson only learned if the kid responds with an appropriate level of contrition?
2012-08-30 05:44:30 PM
4 votes:

StrangeQ: Because conventions are just stupid and anyone that follows them is just stupid so we should all just not follow the conventions and not be stupid.


Not all conventions are stupid- but being forced to reflect on exactly what our conventions are and why they exist is something we absolutely need to do more often.
2012-08-30 05:12:48 PM
4 votes:

xynix: There was this guy in the late 1800s who wore dresses as a kid.. I think his name was Franklin or something. He turned out to be a total loser.

Also blue is the new pink.


Until the late victorian age, all little kids, regardless of gender, were dressed in little dresses. I suspect it was just easier with them growing quickly, and with high mortality rates for children. And with clothes having to be made entirely by hand, they were labor intensive and thus rather expensive. Same reason a male child would wear shorts once he grew out of the dresses- make 'em with enough to fabric in the back, and they can be used for a long time, just letting out the waist and seat as required while the length stays the same.

Shadow Blasko: Gunny Highway: timujin: "Hey, if you and your dad aren't man enough to wear a skirt..."

It isnt clever, it is annoying.

Men were wearing skirts for hundreds of years before pants came along.


More typically robes, but yeah, skirts were in common use before pants were.

What men who wore skirts may look like:

www.mwctoys.com
2012-08-30 05:10:42 PM
4 votes:

The Stealth Hippopotamus: scottydoesntknow: Good for him, but that won't stop the teasing. Unfortunately, it'll probably make it worse.

that was my first thought too. My second thought was anyone who lets their 5 year old tell them how they are going to dress is an idiot.


This is a no-brainer.

It really shouldn't be that big of a deal. Let him wear whatever the fark he wants to wear. Life is about doing what makes you happy.

It seems idiotic to me that people are so petty that they would voice an opinion on what a child is or isn't wearing, or any person for that matter.
2012-08-30 05:01:39 PM
4 votes:
Sigh, what a failure of a parent. Your not helping your making it worse. Do you fix a leaking sink by saying, it isn't the sink's fault but it should be the kitchen that needs to accept the water better.
2012-08-30 04:56:24 PM
4 votes:
get the boy a kilt and call it a day
2012-08-30 04:56:08 PM
4 votes:

Expolaris: jaylectricity: freedom

[celticwarriorkilts.com image 300x481]

There is a land where a mans balls may hang free and clear.

Conventions - Dragon*Con, Comic Con , etc. I let my boys swing with the wind while i'm rocking out with my geek out.

But seriously, good on the Dad for showing unwavering love for his kid. Even if this causes more teasing , the kid knows that he's always got his Dad to back him up. That's way more support than some transgendered adults get from their parents.


You, sir, are absolutely great. (Totally serious here.)
2012-08-30 04:55:09 PM
4 votes:

The Stealth Hippopotamus: scottydoesntknow: Good for him, but that won't stop the teasing. Unfortunately, it'll probably make it worse.

that was my first thought too. My second thought was anyone who lets their 5 year old tell them how they are going to dress is an idiot.


This.
2012-08-30 04:44:38 PM
4 votes:

The Stealth Hippopotamus: scottydoesntknow: Good for him, but that won't stop the teasing. Unfortunately, it'll probably make it worse.

that was my first thought too. My second thought was anyone who lets their 5 year old tell them how they are going to dress is an idiot.


But not nearly as much of an idiot as someone who would take that away from the article.

And, scottydoesntknow, it seems like the kid has come up with a good response to the teasing, at least, with his, "Hey, if you and your dad aren't man enough to wear a skirt..." bit
2012-08-30 04:06:28 PM
4 votes:

Coco LaFemme: Kids are cruel, they're stupid, and they're often times, egged on by their own parents. It would serve the parents of this child well to make him aware of that. Tell him he can wear skirts and dresses at home, around his family, but when he's at school, he has to wear pants/shorts like the other boys.


I'm with you.
GBB [TotalFark]
2012-08-30 08:19:07 PM
3 votes:
suit4mens.com
If this is OK

i.dailymail.co.uk
Then this is OK
2012-08-30 07:02:59 PM
3 votes:

Coco LaFemme: Kids are cruel, they're stupid, and they're often times, egged on by their own parents. It would serve the parents of this child well to make him aware of that. Tell him he can wear skirts and dresses at home, around his family, but when he's at school, he has to wear pants/shorts like the other boys.


I was a nanny for a boy who wore pink nail polish and shiny lip gloss. I sat him down and explained that kids were going to make fun of him and if he couldn't handle it then he can't wear it out of the house. Then we role played strategies that he could use to deal with the teasing. I was so proud the day he was teased and said "I don't care, I like it" and then put a huge gob of lip gloss on
2012-08-30 06:42:57 PM
3 votes:

Kiwimann:
I've had to deal with more than my fair share of jerk ass kids. They're never some sweet boy who likes dresses or nail polish. They're YOUR kids. Kudos to the dad and fark the rest of you.


Examples:

Pumpernickel bread: When he is 5, perhaps the parent should choose attire that will minimize the frequency of ass kickings.

loaba: You wanna Glam it up in high school, son? Go right ahead and when you get your ass kicked will figure it out from there.


Between the kid in a dress and those suggesting violence towards him, it's not the kid that has a problem.
2012-08-30 06:42:44 PM
3 votes:

Pumpernickel bread: I don't think the father his doing his kid any favors. Allow the kid to choose his own clothers when he is older. When he is 5, perhaps the parent should choose attire that will minimize the frequency of ass kickings.


Because teaching your kid that they should cower in fear any time they disagree with society or their peers is SUCH a healthy lesson. You teach the kid how to rise above it. Not just even at a young age, especially at a young age.

Leaders don't come from nowhere.
2012-08-30 06:37:18 PM
3 votes:

Pumpernickel bread: I don't think the father his doing his kid any favors. Allow the kid to choose his own clothers when he is older. When he is 5, perhaps the parent should choose attire that will minimize the frequency of ass kickings.


5 year olds don't generally get violent with other kids over what the other kid is wearing, that comes when they're older. There might be a few giggles, but most of the hurtful comments probably come from parents of the other 5 year olds who somehow imagine that children are deaf to what they say right in front of them.
2012-08-30 06:29:23 PM
3 votes:
So, yeah, Hero tag for the father who puts the psychological well-being of his child before neanderthals who demand that boys like blue and spaceships and girls like pink and unicorns

this
2012-08-30 06:16:29 PM
3 votes:

Treefingers: Link

^A pretty good article about childhood gender fluidity. Ultimately you, as a parent have to figure out if it's worth it to shame your child out of wearing whatever they want to placate your rigid and socially-imposed notions of gender normativity. The trauma inflicted by said shaming is thousands fold the trauma the child endures from wearing a dress in public otherwise. As a parent, your choice is to either join the ranks of the judgmental populace or to be an ally in an otherwise hostile social landscape.

Food for thought. We're embarking on a new era of child rearing and gender/sexuality constructs. No one from either camp really knows what to do with it.
/Popcorn shares and such.


blessthe40oz.com



Subby here. The line of reasoning in the above post (which is backed by an excellent article) was my thought process when choosing the Hero tag that so many people seem to have a problem with. Of course the kid is going to be bullied by kids whose parents have taught them that anyone outside of a strict gender construct is "strange." That's not the primary factor to consider though. The mental health of the boy who identifies as a girl will be much more negatively impacted if his parents start telling him that what he is doing is wrong. Boys can only like blue. Girls can only like pink.

This father appears to be looking out for the mental health of his child. I think that most child psychologists would agree with what he is doing. If the boy identifies as a girl, the parent forcing him into the "male gender box" in order to comply with societal norms is going to screw the kid up more than any bullying ever will. Besides, do you really think that this kid would be otherwise completely normal to his schoolmates if only it wasn't for the dress? It's pretty likely that his differences shine through in other ways and that he's picked on regardless.

So, yeah, Hero tag for the father who puts the psychological well-being of his child before neanderthals who demand that boys like blue and spaceships and girls like pink and unicorns.
2012-08-30 06:00:16 PM
3 votes:
I think this is awesome and beautiful! Kudos to the kid and the father!
2012-08-30 05:56:55 PM
3 votes:
It first I was all "The father is enabling this? Dude, you're raising your kid to be a target of mockery."
Then I was all "Oh. You're teaching him how to be immune from mockery. Good on you, pops."
And then I ended that train of thought with "I'd look like hell in a dress. Mocked certainly, and possibly harpooned."
2012-08-30 05:56:25 PM
3 votes:

craig328: someonelse: craig328: But while dad is busy teaching him the "be your own person and fark what other people think" he's entirely skipping the "the would isn't a fair place son" lesson...

Don't you think that getting picked on for the clothes he wore pretty much accomplished teaching the "the world isn't a fair place" lesson? Or does it only work if the kid is bullied into a state of crippling fear and/or resentment, and experiences no support from anyone whatsoever? Is the lesson only learned if the kid responds with an appropriate level of contrition?

Well...I suppose if we use your model for parenting I can simply explain to the nice doctor at the ER that I didn't feel it necessary to inform my 5 year old that the stove was hot and would cause burns when he laid his hand upon it. I see no reason to protect the entirely unprepared and unsophisticated child for whose safety and security I'm entrusted to exercise actual foresight to avoid such unpleasant experiences. I mean, hell, why would I give him the benefit of my many years of life experience, right? Screw that. "You're 5 now son! You're ready in all regards to make decisions and go take on that world?"

Or, you know, go to kindergarten and maybe not pick your nose in public. Either or.


Your wrong, it should be the resposibility of the other childrens parents to teach thier kids not to be a dick. WTF. Let the kid express himself. It's not his fault a bunch of knuckledraggers don't understand him. Good for the dad for trying to except his kid and walk a mile in his shoes instead of forcing him to live a lie out of fear.
2012-08-30 05:29:34 PM
3 votes:
The kid is five years old ferchrissake. At that age, they have the attention span of a gnat. In a year he'll be wearing something else entirely. Ten years from now he won't even remember he used to like wearing dresses except as the subject of some funny stories his family will tell whenever they get together for thanksgiving dinner.
2012-08-30 05:22:37 PM
3 votes:

scottydoesntknow: timujin:
And, scottydoesntknow, it seems like the kid has come up with a good response to the teasing, at least, with his, "Hey, if you and your dad aren't man enough to wear a skirt..." bit

That won't stop it at all and you know that. Like I said, the dad is trying to make the situation better, but it won't improve.

Everyone needs to know that trying to express yourself outside of societal norms will bring a lot of attention, and a good portion of that will be negative. If you can handle it then more power to you, but don't expect to be accepted just because you're "man enough to wear a skirt" as the kid puts it.


Ya know, if they've got the balls to challenge the norms, good for them. I certainly believe that the kid did it on his own- kids don't "know better". I had a phase in elementary school where went for the glitter thing, painted my nails with my sister and whatnot. It passed without my parents discouraging it (or any bullying that I recall, but this is 1st grade or so, and I don't recall much detail), but if this guy wants to let his kid enjoy himself without slavishly adhering to all of society's stupid conventions and chooses to take those conventions on head on to do it, more power to him. We really need a lot more people like that.
2012-08-30 05:07:10 PM
3 votes:
You're still allowed to say "no" to your kids. It's ok. You don't have to indulge their every whim.
2012-08-30 05:01:17 PM
3 votes:
Hero tag? Try Dumbass tag.

A good father wouldn't let his five year old son dress like a girl at school or anywhere else.
2012-08-30 04:57:54 PM
3 votes:
The kid didn't buy himself those dresses, dig? Pops already said he wore skirts all the time before moving to that town. Good on him conning everyone into thinking he's doing it to help his kid.
2012-08-30 04:47:13 PM
3 votes:
Good on both of em!

/Dresses are comfy and I love long skirts for dancing.
2012-08-30 03:29:24 PM
3 votes:
It's what a good father does, according to Jim.
2012-08-30 02:38:31 PM
3 votes:
Kids are cruel, they're stupid, and they're often times, egged on by their own parents. It would serve the parents of this child well to make him aware of that. Tell him he can wear skirts and dresses at home, around his family, but when he's at school, he has to wear pants/shorts like the other boys.
2012-08-30 01:57:24 PM
3 votes:
Good for him, but that won't stop the teasing. Unfortunately, it'll probably make it worse.
2012-08-30 10:50:33 PM
2 votes:
Everyone should be free to be themselves so long as they hurt nobody. If Edwina the lady librarian fools not a one while being built like a 7' tall linebacker with 4' shoulders I will always refer to her as a lady until she takes off the makeup, puts on non sexy suspenders, and calls himself Hank. Father of the half millenium to the German dude.
2012-08-30 07:20:28 PM
2 votes:
My 6 year old son will be the first to put on a frilly tutu and show you his Swan Lake interpretation.

He also will be the first to punch you in the face if you say anything.

/I will be the second
2012-08-30 07:01:45 PM
2 votes:

Dull Cow Eyes: Uh...the father is a cross-dressing attention whore dressing his son in women's clothing. Scary.


Suppose, for sake of argument, that's exactly what's going on. What exactly is scary about it?

What's scary to me are some of the outfits that people put on young girls.
2012-08-30 06:46:14 PM
2 votes:
The amount of ignorant bigotry in this thread is staggering. Let the kid wear what he wants, at least he's not the one out on the playground telling other kids they look/sound/act/are stupid.
2012-08-30 06:45:19 PM
2 votes:
Alright, I worked on V-8 engines, watched original "Star Trek" and John Wayne movies with my Dad, spent ten years in the Navy including one tour in the Persian Gulf, then proceeded to be married for ten years. All of that was what society expected me to do; doing the "manly" things kept me from having to face the displeasure of the society I grew up in.

I know a 17 year old boy that wears women's jeans, carries a purse and has hair down to the shoulders. He's the bravest person I know.

The father in the linked story is doing the right thing because he's teaching the kid to be himself, not to be what the world around him expects. It's great because it's honest. Teaching a 5-year-old to keep up one appearance for the public, and to only be himself at home, is dishonest and it would either take him decades to unlearn or kill him. Great story.
2012-08-30 06:41:47 PM
2 votes:

spman: The thing is, unless he at some point moves, the kids he's in school with now, are mostly going to be the exact same ones he'll be going to school with until his senior year of high school. Kids are assholes, and particularly judgmental, and once you get stigmatized as a weirdo, or a nerd, or a bully, or whatever, it's damn near impossible to change other peoples opinion of you. So guess what, if you act like a weirdo in first grade, and your peers shun you and cast you out for being a weirdo, that shiats going to follow you until you leave, or you graduate High School. The impression you make on people in Kindergarten will absolutely follow you for a long, long time.


Jeez, what's it like living in such a small town?
2012-08-30 06:39:12 PM
2 votes:

pounddawg:

Our 5 year old picks out his own clothes.
/not an idiot


Yes you are an idiot, if you think we would believe that lie. If your 5 year old picked out his own clothes, he'd be going to school dressed as batman. And if you let your 5 year old pick his own clothes from the store (which you don't because you're lying) you'd be a terrible parent. Since you are a blatent liar you probally are a horrible influence on your child, and your child probably be as dumb as you and a plague on society as well. 5 Year olds are not old enough to pick out a wardrobe, they can't even dress themselves. So don't lie to us you pathetic liberal piece of garbage.
2012-08-30 06:37:09 PM
2 votes:

ZoeNekros: Theaetetus: ZoeNekros: Tell them that people have strange attitudes about gender norms; that other children will tease, that many will look at them funny, and some will be outright confrontational. Tell them that for now I am going to make the decisions about what they can wear to shield them from that... They may wear a dress when they're capable of responding maturely to people's teases and objections on their own.

And removing choice from someone to shield them from others sure is a mature way of responding...

Note, we are talking about removing choice from a child. We do this all the time, and should. Autonomy is not a binary thing. Responsible parents respond to their children growing up by granting them more and more decision making.


Sure. We don't let them eat candy for dinner or play in the street, because those things can physically harm them. But "shielding" them from getting teased, without any further justification? Over something that is this meaningless? No, removing choice in this situations is irresponsible, and puts the parent's emotional desires ahead of the child's, which is pretty immature.
2012-08-30 06:33:09 PM
2 votes:

relcec: Theaetetus:
/this guy's a father of the year candidate

or perhaps simply an attention whore.
my 5-year-old likes to wear dresses (who gives a rip) and I've decided to wear dresses and contact the media in solidarity!


Father of the year here is putting his face in the media, knowing that small minded people will say all sorts of mean things about him. Publicly opposing popular sentiment frequently requires more courage than the same actions done anonymously.
2012-08-30 06:19:38 PM
2 votes:
I don't understand some of the hate in this thread, nor those who think the dad is crazy for allowing his son to do this. It's very possible that the boy truly feels that he is really a girl inside.

The pain of feeling like you're the wrong gender is strong enough that it makes you think about suicide. I would know... =(
2012-08-30 06:17:12 PM
2 votes:
Oh, no, the kid might grow up to be a sissy! Much better that he learns that he should do what everyone else does, unquestioningly, out of fear or bullying, like many here suggest. That's the way to be a real man.

/this guy's a father of the year candidate
2012-08-30 06:08:46 PM
2 votes:

AlgaeRancher: get the boy a kilt and call it a day


and if they complain, say they're harassing you about your heritage
2012-08-30 06:06:36 PM
2 votes:

MrBonestripper: Hagenhatesyouall: Hero tag?

HERO?

How about a farking ZERO.

Part of being a parent is to keep kids from doing stupid shiat like, say, wearing a g'damn dress to school when you're a 5 year old boy.

Part of being a responsible parent and a decent human being is teaching your kids not to be judgmental wastrels.


Freaking this!
2012-08-30 06:03:21 PM
2 votes:

codergirl42: Your wrong, it should be the resposibility of the other childrens parents to teach thier kids not to be a dick. WTF. Let the kid express himself. It's not his fault a bunch of knuckledraggers don't understand him. Good for the dad for trying to except his kid and walk a mile in his shoes instead of forcing him to live a lie out of fear.



I was right with you there til you used the word SHOULD instead of, you know, actually acknowledging the world as it, in fact, functions.

But hey, don't let reality get in the way of your perfectly logical rebuttal. It's just the kid that'll pay for your parently indolence. Congrats!
2012-08-30 06:00:25 PM
2 votes:

craig328: Part of being a dad is to impart a sense of self-esteem and independence to kids. But that's not the ONLY responsibility of dad. Sometimes dad needs to be the one that says "yeah son, I know you like wearing these things but see, chances are the other kids won't understand and they'll treat you kind of poorly for that. No, it's not fair but then again, life in general isn't. It's fine to have goals and aspirations and want to change the world but you also need to understand that there are a great many others who won't see it your way and who will have the equal freedom to pillory you for your actions".

But before you even get to that conversation, if you actually are the dad, you remind yourself that the kid is a mere 5 years old, just perhaps a couple of years removed from crapping in his own pants (when he used to wear them) and that he has zero life experience to inform decisions like this...so you say "no" and say "maybe later when you're older, you can make this decision for yourself but today you're five, I'm dad and I'm saying no so you don't end up getting beaten up at school". Cause, you know, dads look out for their kids.


Or sometimes Dad needs to be the one that says "yeah, son, I know you like wearing these things, and it's okay that you do, but see, chances are the other kids won't understand and they'll treat you kind of poorly for that. That reflects on them, not you. But it's going to hurt your feelings. Why don't we pack a pair of jeans and a t-shirt in your backpack in case you change your mind at lunch."
2012-08-30 05:46:42 PM
2 votes:

Canned Tamales: I have to admit...people who feel that they have to push boundaries and challenge perceptions can seem annoying and attention whorish, especially to silly, dozy, easily frightened sheeple...

But those of you (non-trolls) who feel the need to criticize and complain and talk shiat about what a "real dad' does, or who push your various "norms" and "standards" as somehow important...

Just who the hell are you, except cowardly, fearful little turds? Why are pants such a part of your identity?
Why should what anybody wears be such an issue for you, who aren't even involved? Why the fearful reactions?


I'm 6'4, bald, bearded, and beer-bellied....pathetic reactions like I've seen here make me want to find your neighborhoods and roam the streets in full flaming drag while blowing kisses to everyone, just to scare the shiat out of y'all.


Sometimes it seems easy to tell who has kids and who doesn't and whose duty as "dad" extended no further than grunting, rolling off and wiping their dick on the curtains afterward.

Part of being a dad is to impart a sense of self-esteem and independence to kids. But that's not the ONLY responsibility of dad. Sometimes dad needs to be the one that says "yeah son, I know you like wearing these things but see, chances are the other kids won't understand and they'll treat you kind of poorly for that. No, it's not fair but then again, life in general isn't. It's fine to have goals and aspirations and want to change the world but you also need to understand that there are a great many others who won't see it your way and who will have the equal freedom to pillory you for your actions".

But before you even get to that conversation, if you actually are the dad, you remind yourself that the kid is a mere 5 years old, just perhaps a couple of years removed from crapping in his own pants (when he used to wear them) and that he has zero life experience to inform decisions like this...so you say "no" and say "maybe later when you're older, you can make this decision for yourself but today you're five, I'm dad and I'm saying no so you don't end up getting beaten up at school". Cause, you know, dads look out for their kids.
2012-08-30 05:40:34 PM
2 votes:
I suspect the kid is gay but so what. Many of my friends that are gay say they knew at a very early age that they were. Since kids are blood-thirsty pack animals looking for the slightest sign of weakness it probably wouldn't matter as he was probably different anyway. If it gives the kid the courage to stand up to the pack it might actually make things better. If he honestly feels secure and the pack can't get a rise from him then they will move on to other prey.

Being male and having worn a skirt in support of a friend in a drag contest I can honestly say they are awesome. The freedom and fresh air is quite nice. I will admit I did feel weird for about 30 minutes and then was like meh, so what.
2012-08-30 05:37:52 PM
2 votes:

Chunky_Charlie: This is a no-brainer.

It really shouldn't be that big of a deal. Let him wear whatever the fark he wants to wear. Life is about doing what makes you happy.

It seems idiotic to me that people are so petty that they would voice an opinion on what a child is or isn't wearing, or any person for that matter.


You know what I'd bet'll make him happier than wearing a dress? How about "not getting picked on in school by the other kids for wearing a dress"?

What if picking on a sissy kid is what makes the other kids happy? Since "life is about doing what makes you happy" they're good to go, right?

I get how it OUGHT not to happen that the kid gets picked on for whatever entirely avoidable reason he's being picked on. But while dad is busy teaching him the "be your own person and fark what other people think" he's entirely skipping the "the would isn't a fair place son" lesson...and then remind him that unless space travel really takes off in the next few years, he's likely stuck on this world and ought to consider how his decisions, noble though they may be, might affect how much he enjoys his time here.
2012-08-30 05:32:13 PM
2 votes:

skantea: I hope for everyone's sake the kid is actually gay, otherwise he may not appreciate this much when he's in high school and college trying to get laid.


You really think a girl's going to be turned off because you wore a skirt when you were 5?

Women love that shiat.
2012-08-30 05:20:06 PM
2 votes:
i.imgur.com

I look forward to our gender views evolving.
2012-08-30 05:07:04 PM
2 votes:
Kilts are sexy :)
2012-08-30 05:02:06 PM
2 votes:
img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net

img1.fark.net
2012-08-30 04:58:49 PM
2 votes:
And the bar for the 'hero' tag falls lower and lower and lower...
2012-08-30 04:58:03 PM
2 votes:
Dad looks and sounds like he was wearing dresses long before that kid was concieved. Spent two years in Bavaria and had plenty of time to observe the strange sexual quirks of the everyday Herr and Damen.
2012-08-30 04:56:25 PM
2 votes:

loaba: My boy wears pants and I'm ever so thankful for that.

/he does like to watch My Little Ponies...


So.. he's a young Brony?


/are we supposed to fist-bump or something.
//ponies with captions amuse me.
2012-08-30 04:55:33 PM
2 votes:
"'After all, you can't expect a child at pre-school age to have the same ability to assert themselves as an adult completely without role model. And so I became that role model.'"

Yeah, you were looking for any excuse you could to resume wearing skirts yourself. Nice try pretending that you're doing it for your kid.
2012-08-30 04:54:05 PM
2 votes:

TheOther: While wearing a dress, how many 5 y/o can the dad defeat to protect his son?


None, but at least he respects his son enough to try.
2012-08-30 04:53:37 PM
2 votes:
Yeah, it was probably the other way around. Junior spies dad donning the crotchless panties, bustier, leather mini skirt, fishnets and stilettos and decides he wants to be just like dear old dad. Later dad can teach him the dangers of barebacking with strangers in the park.
2012-08-30 04:50:07 PM
2 votes:

timujin: "Hey, if you and your dad aren't man enough to wear a skirt..."


It isnt clever, it is annoying.
2012-08-30 04:48:23 PM
2 votes:
I can just see it now.

"Your momma wears combat boots!"

"No, that's my dad, and you probably shouldn't piss him off"
2012-08-31 10:26:27 PM
1 votes:

BraveNewCheneyWorld: WhyteRaven74: BraveNewCheneyWorld: the kid is farked up and his parents aren't doing their job.

He isn't and they are.

You just want it to be true...

Frankly, I think it's sad that you'd support parents who encourage their kids to live in a delusion just so you can avoid addressing the fact that you yourself have problems.


Your viewpoint is not fact, and you've still haven't answered my question. What do you think of girls and women wearing men's clothes?

Red_Fox: Silly Jesus: have taught them that anyone outside of a strict gender construct is "strange."

Sorry OP but it's not "strange" it's freaky weird and if you think the average person will ever think it's normal to let a little boy wear dressed you are wrong.

/And this is coming from someone on the left.


Once upon a time the "average person" didn't think it was "normal" for women to wear pants, shorts, and regular shirts, the "male clothes". Why are people like you so afraid and angry about boys and men wearing "female clothes"?
2012-08-31 03:26:51 PM
1 votes:
It's nice to know that Farkers only support tolerance in cases other than dirty crossdressers.

Thankfully gays and brown people are still okay.
2012-08-31 01:48:29 AM
1 votes:
As a person who works in children's retail apparel sales and is very humanistic/libertarian/freethinking/whatever, I'm getting a kick out of this.

I personally wouldn't care if I had a son who wanted to wear dresses and a girl who wanted to only wear pants, or even just out-right male-ish clothing. So what if a child is ostracized by the people too scared to be different from their peers and on the fringes of social groups? The kid being different isn't causing the problems, it's the other kids (and their parents) who are all the same in their sheepish thinking that a child having deviant behavior and a father reinforcing is wrong.

How does it affect YOU if a dad decides he wants to indulge his son in what he enjoys? It's not hurting YOU. YOU may think it'll hurt this kid's development, but FRTFA, I gather this dad is very easy going and supportive of his son and will be there for him to guide him through whatever social trials they may endure. And the boy will grow up to be a tolerant, accepting, and loving individual.

In my store, it often disturbs me when I see a parent's reaction to their children's interest in items that aren't in line with gender stereotypes. Often times the parent's eyes bulge and I can see the horror in their thoughts that their little boy would like a girls' shirt, or maybe a tutu. Granted, I see so very little of girls expressing interest in boys items, but the few reactions I see aren't as horrifying. Because it's okay for girls to more masculine, but not for boys to be more feminine. *rolls eyes*

What really stumps me is the scare folks give themselves when worrying that their purchases aren't "girly" or "boyish" enough or too "girly" or too "boyish". You have people who want the girls they are shopping for to look like little girls full of innocence, but then you have people who want the boys they are shopping for to look like little men in their tiny baby khakis and polo tops and bodysuits.

Frankly, the amount of time and fear folks put into this kind of thought I find ridiculous. What is so bad about being different? If folks can't accept the boy's differences but he can accept your sameness, why is he the problem?

Get over it. Learn from it. Grow. Evolve. Progress. PLEASE! It is too much to ask?!

/same argument can be made for gay marriage
//and atheism
///hell, even hedonism
2012-08-31 12:10:03 AM
1 votes:

BraveNewCheneyWorld: chaosweaver: BraveNewCheneyWorld: chaosweaver: People SHOULD be able to express themselves in manners such as this, unfortunately, the reality is still that there are people who will make a big deal about it.

Yeah, you should support your children and not give them any insight into why they shouldn't be blind supporters of nazis, republicans or nambla either. Maybe you should let them fark the family dog or cat, or set them on fire if that's what they feel drawn too, right? Let them be free!!!!

Reality check.. kids go through farked up stages of ignorance and brutality. It's the parents' job to educate them, and get them in sync with reality.

Funny, I just, in the same post you quoted from, talked about people taking things out of context to try and make some rediculous point.

Maybe that was the idea, and you're just trolling, if so, kudos to you, sir. Otherwise, I think you need to start relearning your reading comprehension.

Would it be reasonable to assume I have to read the 45 previous instances of your handle to get the context of that post? Newsflash, you're not that important. 

To reiterate, the kid is farked up and his parents aren't doing their job.


Why is he farked up? Because he's not doing what YOU think he should? That he's not conforming to what YOU think he should? Why are you getting your dick in a knot about it? Why should pieces of cloth determine what role in life a person should lead? Do you also think that women should stop wearing three-piece suits because those belong to men?

Jesus, two people in here equating letting a child wear what clothes he wants to giving him permission to mass murder and wanton destruction, and both frightened and disgusted over what they think is a horrible ungodly breach of some set-in-stone commandment about what clothing someone should wear.
2012-08-30 11:50:39 PM
1 votes:
This affects me as much as gay marriage does.
2012-08-30 09:56:31 PM
1 votes:

chaosweaver: In current society there are consequences for actions that are outside the norm.


In Germany people react differently to that than in the US. They are actually more laid back about it.
2012-08-30 09:54:06 PM
1 votes:

chaosweaver: Keizer_Ghidorah: chaosweaver: And it seems Keizer missed the point entirely.

You spoke of "derp from both sides of the issue" while saying oth will create mass murderers and other unsavory people. The only depr on this matter is from people who are still so hung up on gender roles and the power pieces of fabric have that they react with fear, hate, and disgust towards those who don't conform to what they think is "right", and in your mind not being concerned with all of that baloney and letting kids wear what they want is what creates serial killers.

Oh, for the love of frilly knickers! I said nothing about what someone wearing having anything to do with disemboleling small woodland creatures. If you would drop the bloody outrage for a second, you'd realize that my whole statement was about teaching children that there are consequences to their actions. In fact, I'm sure I said it at least three times. In current society there are consequences for actions that are outside the norm. The child needs to learn that, so that when he is old enough he can find a way to go about changing it.

Yes, the little Jeffy D. Part was a bit of extreme hyperbole, but the first time he had to deal with the consequences of his actions was AFTER he had killed a half-dozen Filipinos.


I'm curious, what are the consequences of denying oneself a life of happiness for fear or ridicule?
2012-08-30 09:50:41 PM
1 votes:
I'm a parent and I read the article. My understanding is that sex is determined at conception and is expressed genetically and gender developes later in the brain and is expressed behaviorally.

What I see here is a kid whose gender got set to female, while his sex is male. These things happen, we don't know why, but this isn't anything new. And it seems his gender switch got set all the over to Disney Princess. I'm guessing he has a big sister who he wants to emulate and he got caught up in wearing her old dresses and skirts.

It sounds like he feels at ease in dresses, but he knew that if he wore a dress to school the other kids would laugh, here it sounded like he was apprehensive that his behavior might be wrong via social cues. He goes to his father and asks him if it is ok for him to wear a dress, and he also asks his father to MAKE it ok by wearing a dress himself. Which is something a child would do, and I think is very sweet. In any case, it seems the child was having self esteem issues stemming from starting to identify the miss-match between his sex and his gender. What he was really asking his father was, "What is wrong with me?". The answers the father here had to choose between were, "everything", or "nothing".

I would wear a dress if that were my son, because I love him.
2012-08-30 09:37:46 PM
1 votes:
Based on only the picture the kid looks happy, I am ok with this
2012-08-30 09:30:29 PM
1 votes:

chaosweaver: Keizer_Ghidorah: ThrobblefootSpectre: Keizer_Ghidorah: 'd be laughing at people who react with such horror and vitriol, too.

As long as you agree that laughing at people we think are funny is okay, then we seem to be on the same side of this issue.

I laugh at stupid people, assholish people, and retarded people. Those people are ones who get hung up over their precious gender role ideals and screech about people who don't conform to them. So we might still be on opposite sides, depending on who you consider "right" or "wrong" about this.

/few people think women wearing men's clothes is a horrible thing these days
//will be a good day when we stop being idiots about men wearing women's clothes

Ooh, I like that, it's okay for me to laugh at you for your views, but laugh at mine and you're either stupid retarded or an asshole.

I have learned a valuable lesson on Fark today.


Hey, if you feel you need to be a dick towards people becaus eof what they choose to wear, knock yourself out. I'll just shake my head and continue to not give a damn about what others wear. It hurts me 0% what others choose to garb themselves in, I don't feel the need to demand they conform to what others say should be, and in the end life goes on.

ThrobblefootSpectre: Keizer_Ghidorah: I laugh at stupid people, assholish people, and retarded people.

Okay, I think we have established what type of person you are then.

I only laugh at people who willingly make funny choices.


Glad to see you're so easily amused. Maybe one day you'll finish growing up and stop being so concerned about what others choose to wear.
2012-08-30 09:26:52 PM
1 votes:

someonelse: Still, people are infusing this possibly bullsh:t story with a lot of their own weird gender hangups.


I agree. Some people are.

But to me, and probably several other posters, this has nothing to do with any gender issue, gender hangup, gender anything at all. It's a matter of making choices about your behavior in public, whatever that behavior that feels good to you may be. The boy in a dress is irrelevant to being a good parent. (Though there are some people who seem curiously over enthusiastic about 5 year old boys in dresses. Which is okay too, I suppose.)

I just think about it in terms of unusual choice "x". The first time I did thing "x" (some unusual behavior that people don't normally see in public) as a very young child and got laughed at, I learned something. "Okay, people laugh at weird thing "x" that I like to do. I do it because it feels so good and right. But I can make a choice about doing thing x in public. It's my choice, and I don't expect a million people to conform around my choices."
2012-08-30 09:24:49 PM
1 votes:

chaosweaver: And it seems Keizer missed the point entirely.


You spoke of "derp from both sides of the issue" while saying oth will create mass murderers and other unsavory people. The only depr on this matter is from people who are still so hung up on gender roles and the power pieces of fabric have that they react with fear, hate, and disgust towards those who don't conform to what they think is "right", and in your mind not being concerned with all of that baloney and letting kids wear what they want is what creates serial killers.
2012-08-30 09:21:44 PM
1 votes:

Silly Jesus: Subby here. The line of reasoning in the above post (which is backed by an excellent article) was my thought process when choosing the Hero tag that so many people seem to have a problem with. Of course the kid is going to be bullied by kids whose parents have taught them that anyone outside of a strict gender construct is "strange." That's not the primary factor to consider though. The mental health of the boy who identifies as a girl will be much more negatively impacted if his parents start telling him that what he is doing is wrong. Boys can only like blue. Girls can only like pink.


Thoughts, intrigue, newsletter, subscribe, etc.
2012-08-30 09:13:49 PM
1 votes:
One day men wearing dresses, lace, and high-heels in regular everyday things will be commonplace and the same effect on humanity and civilization will happed (i.e. nothing at all).

Such as France in the 16 and 1700s? Don't you know that caused the world to blow up?

Apparently we did read different articles. The one I read said the dad openly enjoyed people reactions in the street and was "proud" that he and his son were the topic of conversation of the entire town.

Actually he was proud that he and his son got people identifying and talking about their assumptions. Quite an accomplishment as assumptions are generally invisible. When people react on the street it means they are 1) paying attention - something rare by itself, and 2) forced to think about what 'normal' means.
2012-08-30 09:03:24 PM
1 votes:

jmk4fark: We seem to have read totally diffenerent articles. It was a rather harmless thing about gender stereotypes and did not seem atention whoring at all to me.


Probably all in the interpretation. If you take the dude at his word, and assume he has his kid's best interest at heart, it's a warm story. To me, it sounded like the dude with a persecution/superiority complex, and he was assigning all of his gender issues to his kid, and then using the kid's proxy issues to suck up attention for himself, but admittedly I'm reading way more between the lines than the actual text. Again, I'd probably feel differently if the source were a third-person piece of fluff news/editorial, but knowing it's the dude writing a letter about himself and his son, to a feminist magazine, smells of preaching to the choir in search of easy praise. A man writing to feminist magazines is certainly no crime, or anything to be ashamed of, nor does it suggest some sort of inherent gender confusion, but to me it serves as another subtle example toward the 'chicken and egg' dynamic of this relationship.....it's very unlikely that the guy started reading and writing to feminist magazines in recent days, as a result of his kid wearing dresses. So, he's the kind of guy, who by his own admission in the article enjoys publicly confronting his neighbors, who is an ardent enough feminist that he writes in to feminist magazines, and enjoys wearing dresses and painting his nails. Absolutely none of that is wrong in any way, until you force it on your kid, and make him the public face of your own issues.

I'd also note that the kid is currently 5, and has been in dresses long enough to garner public comment in two communities, and the dad talks about the both of them dressing in skirts "back in earlier days". What if this was happening when the kid was 4? 3? Whose issues are we talking about at that point? And once again, just to be triply clear, if dude has gender questions/curiosity and/or wants to wear a dress, I've got no problem with it. Double ditto for the kid, if he's doing it on his own accord. If, however, the dude is encouraging this kid to have gender issues, or confusing his gender, whether actively or subconsciously, I think that's a shame. Kid could potentially go through years of confusion and shame trying to reconcile issues that aren't even his. But at least his dad has gone out of his way to make his gender/sexuality a highly public issue, both in his small, religious town, and now the world over, before he's even turned six years old. I'm sure that will help.
2012-08-30 08:46:07 PM
1 votes:

chaosweaver: To the people who say let their snowflake do whatever they want, that's how we got whackos like Mr. Dhamer, that whole no supervision, no consequences thing.


Call me crazy, but there are probably a few levels in between letting a kid wear a dress and letting a kid kill and impale local stray animals.
2012-08-30 08:45:44 PM
1 votes:

spamdog: Keizer_Ghidorah: the men who crow the most about masculinity are often the biggest pussies

Why am I not surprised that I have you tagged as a brony?


Don't watch the show, don't see how what I said relates specifically to it.

ThrobblefootSpectre: jmk4fark: We seem to have read totally diffenerent articles. It was a rather harmless thing about gender stereotypes and did not seem atention whoring at all to me.

Apparently we did read different articles. The one I read said the dad openly enjoyed people reactions in the street and was "proud" that he and his son were the topic of conversation of the entire town.


And in your mind that = attention whoring. Of course, half of Fark seems to think that anyone who gets mentioned in the news for any reason is an attention whore, so who knows.

I'd be laughing at people who react with such horror and vitriol, too. It's some fabric sewn together for the purpose of covering the body, tell me why we should give a flying fig about how it looks or who wears it.
2012-08-30 08:42:09 PM
1 votes:
Sweet tittie glitter Jesus! I'm not sure where it happened, but you all need to switch to decaf. To the people who say let their snowflake do whatever they want, that's how we got whackos like Mr. Dhamer, that whole no supervision, no consequences thing.

And to those who think controlling every aspect of their child's lives as they grow is a good idea, shielding them so that they have no idea what consequences are, that's how we end up with unwed, unemployed teen moms.

Both are a burden on society, though one adds people to the world, and the other takes them out (that was humour) and each follows an extreme that leads to a similar problem, children growing up without understanding that actions have consequences in the world we ARE IN. I mean, if your kid sticks a fork in a socket and comes crying to you because he got shocked, you don't blame the socket for hurting your child and then switch to being amish, do you? (It's not a perfect analogy, so sue me.)

At this age, you should be teaching your kid that doing A usually causes B. In a few years, once he/she's old enough to know why B is caused by A, should you begin to explain how B should be C.

Case in point, if a parent wants to teach their child that clothing choices shouldn't matter simply based on what bits you possess, the child needs to first understand that the world (and internet) is full of judgemental assholes, and until someone can make a REAL change, they are going to have to deal with criticism.

I now return you to you regularly scheduled snark.
2012-08-30 08:14:27 PM
1 votes:

craig328: Look, I'm literally the last guy who will tell someone else how to raise their kids.


For the last guy to tell someone how to raise their kids you sure seem to be telling a lot of people that they are wrong.
2012-08-30 08:13:32 PM
1 votes:
Holy fark there are a lot of arseholes out today. Sure this probably isn't going to make it better, but damn, some of you people are awful. You should sit the kid down and ask, "Why do you want to wear the dress?" Doesn't really matter what the answer is, because next you ask "And is that worth getting made fun of for?" If the answer is yes, then support the kid. Just make sure they know that people suck, and he will probably get a lot of teasing. Let him know that you support his decision, you just want to be sure he understands the consequences.
2012-08-30 08:04:09 PM
1 votes:

octopied: Some kids like to wear superhero costumes all the time too, doesn't mean they do it at school.

At that age,why not say "You can wear this at home, but not at school" If he still wants to wear a dress in several years when he's old enough to understand social backlash, then go with it.


You can be gay at home, but not at school....

Like that?
2012-08-30 08:01:37 PM
1 votes:
You know, the intelligent thing to do would be for humanity to grow up, stop demanding that certain people wear certain things because "IT'S WHAT WE'VE ALWAYS DONE AND WE'RE AFRAID OF ANYTHING DIFFERENT", stop assigning gender roles to people, and let everyone wear whatever the hell they want.

Once upon a time, the idea of women wearing pants was considered sinful and destructive to civilization. Nowadays women wear pants, shorts, boots, and all other male clothes and only the old religious nutjobs and old misogynist nutjobs raise a stink over it. One day men wearing dresses, lace, and high-heels in regular everyday things will be commonplace and the same effect on humanity and civilization will happed (i.e. nothing at all).

It's funny how the people who are loudest about gender roles, masculinity, and conformity are also the most frightened by anything going against those, as if they're personally afraid of something happening to them if they see another man wear a skirt. It's a lot like homosexuality, the loudest anti-ones seem to be terrified that they'll somehow turn gay by seeing or being near a gay person.

/wear whatever the fark you want if you find it comfortable or fashionable, be it a bikini or a chicken suit, I don't give a fark
//if you're hot and have a nice ass, I request that you rock a Speedo or thong
2012-08-30 07:47:36 PM
1 votes:
...ah well, I leave for a bit to see what the froth at the mouth club comes back with and I get "Johnny Cash is my parental inspiration" and a couple of folks who clearly don't have kids and, if we're all collectively lucky, won't.

Anyway, rebut all you like. The world isn't the way you WISH it was, it's the way it is. You can encourage your 5 year old (who still thinks you're God incarnate, infallible and the person he/she holds in the most ridiculously high esteem) to go butt heads with the rest of society because that's what you think is the "right" thing to do...and then you'll be the person blaming everyone else that your kid's head has attained the consistency of eggshells suspended in a jello slurry for his parental-encouraged efforts and doesn't understand why he/she has few friends and people regard them as weird.

To you as an adult, weird is okay...BUT THAT'S BECAUSE YOU'RE OLD ENOUGH TO MAKE THAT DECISION. To a kid, it's a life changer...and it's his/her life, not yours. If they want to be the outlier later on when they can decide that's what they want to be: cool. To set them on that path when they don't know well enough...well, as a parent, you pretty much suck.

Hey, you smoke, drink and do recreational drugs...why not your kid? Hell, let THEM decide, right? By all means, don't exercise any real parental decision making (because, hey, decisions are hard). Nah, just leave it up to the 5 year old. In fact, chances are, he may even be more mature than you. It's not a whole lot different when they're 5 and trying to learn how to function with their peers and get along. Surely that'll have no lasting repercussions for the rest of their entire life. Nah, it's society that'll surely bend and everyone will celebrate everyone's individuality whilst singing kumbayah in a drum circle.

I don't endorse any of that but as a parent I'm also aware that this is the way the world works, regardless of whether I want it to or not. Tossing the decision making responsibilities to your kid because you're too big a pussy to actually BE a parent and look out for them (because it may go against your politically correct social views) until they're old enough and informed enough to decide for themselves isn't exactly being a good parent.

And now I'm off again. Ya'll check with some more old 45s for further guidance.
2012-08-30 07:35:33 PM
1 votes:
Some kids like to wear superhero costumes all the time too, doesn't mean they do it at school.

At that age,why not say "You can wear this at home, but not at school" If he still wants to wear a dress in several years when he's old enough to understand social backlash, then go with it.
2012-08-30 07:34:24 PM
1 votes:
I'll agree to being clueless on this but I think those of you that have been hammering away at the sexuality / transgender issues are forgetting the key part of the story. The kid is 5! He's not waffling about who/what he wants to fu(k. He probably doesn't even know what it is. I'm a straight man, and the father of 3 kids, but if you had asked me about kissing somebody, it wouldn't have registered one way or the other until the first day of 7th grade when Valerie Costello walked in with her boobs.
2012-08-30 07:31:01 PM
1 votes:
This thread is proof that some people have completely lost their minds. As though we needed thread to prove that.

A 5 year old? Making decisions? Doesn't matter how smart your 5 year old is because their world is still firmly rooted in fantasy. And that's OK, because, you know, they're FIVE. But you aduilts thinking it's OK for a five year old to make real decisions? Up the dosage because your doctor isn't prescribing enough.
2012-08-30 07:29:53 PM
1 votes:
This sets off flags for me. I don't care that the kid wears a dress, I don't care that the dad wears a dress. I do care that the dad seems to be using the kid's apparently fragile gender identity as a magnet for his own attention.

Note that despite the subject being presented as the kid, the father's name is all over the article, and the father's actions are the real subject, the kid is just used as the subject so that it won't sound like personal bragging. This wasn't an editorial or news piece, it's the father himself, writing in to a German feminist magazine, complaining of his own persecution (in several communities) and commending his own resolve. From the article, the father mentions several conversations with parents in multiple communities, but certainly the kid's not the one having those conversations. Then there's the phrase "We already had skirt and dress days back then during mild Kreuzbergian weather." which implies that dude was wearing dresses before his kid was, rather than the other way around, which, again, I have no other problem with, other than the suggestion that the dude is forcing gender issues on his kid that may be his own. All of the quotes of the 'little dude' pertaining to his liking of dresses, seem to have little to do with the actual wearing of dresses, and more to do with his father, whether it's wondering when daddy was going to wear his skirts again, the attention they garner from walking down the street together in dresses, how both their nails look good painted, or saying that other boys don't wear dresses only because their father's don't. It doesn't sound so much like the kid likes wearing dresses, as he likes wearing dresses with daddy, because daddy likes wearing dresses.....which is a good reason for the both of you to hang out in dresses, but a shiatty reason to force your 5 year-old kid to be the center of the town's public debate on gender.

Encouraging and supporting a kid with gender/sexuality curiosity is one thing, and a sign of a healthy and wise parent. Encouraging or assigning gender issues (for attention apparently) to your child is another thing entirely, and some willfully shiatty parenting. I'll give this dude enough slack not to convict him without knowing him or his situation personally, but at the very least, he's the kind of fellow who would write into a feminist magazine in order to publicly laud his own courage for encouraging his son to wear dresses in reaction to the supposed vocal protest of the father's peers in several communities. It comes off as both a plea for sympathy, and a pandering report of a magnificent triumph. If this were a third-person report I might feel a little differently.
2012-08-30 07:27:29 PM
1 votes:

Gunny Highway: Theaetetus: ZoeNekros: Theaetetus: ZoeNekros: Tell them that people have strange attitudes about gender norms; that other children will tease, that many will look at them funny, and some will be outright confrontational. Tell them that for now I am going to make the decisions about what they can wear to shield them from that... They may wear a dress when they're capable of responding maturely to people's teases and objections on their own.

And removing choice from someone to shield them from others sure is a mature way of responding...

Note, we are talking about removing choice from a child. We do this all the time, and should. Autonomy is not a binary thing. Responsible parents respond to their children growing up by granting them more and more decision making.

Sure. We don't let them eat candy for dinner or play in the street, because those things can physically harm them. But "shielding" them from getting teased, without any further justification? Over something that is this meaningless? No, removing choice in this situations is irresponsible, and puts the parent's emotional desires ahead of the child's, which is pretty immature.

There are lots of different methods of parenting that work. I dont think parents being over protective of their children is so terrible.


No? That's why so many kids go into the world today thinking nothing bad could or should happen to them, regardless of how much of a farktard or douchebag they may be. Kids get teased, it generally makes them stronger and more able to deal with assholes, instead of becoming those types of assholes
2012-08-30 07:25:04 PM
1 votes:
Didn't read the article or all of the posts, how is this helping the kid, if he is going to this same school till high school he will be tormented, right or wrong, these are kids, unless the kid turns into a beefy linbacker in public school he will picked on relentlessly and the parents will make fun of the dad.. In fantasy land maybe not but in the real world,yes. Flame on me but it is the way, would of happened 100 years ago, will happen 100 years in future.
2012-08-30 07:11:08 PM
1 votes:
Is this where dudes in skirts hang out?

img.photobucket.com
2012-08-30 06:54:32 PM
1 votes:

craig328: codergirl42: Your wrong, it should be the resposibility of the other childrens parents to teach thier kids not to be a dick. WTF. Let the kid express himself. It's not his fault a bunch of knuckledraggers don't understand him. Good for the dad for trying to except his kid and walk a mile in his shoes instead of forcing him to live a lie out of fear.


I was right with you there til you used the word SHOULD instead of, you know, actually acknowledging the world as it, in fact, functions.

But hey, don't let reality get in the way of your perfectly logical rebuttal. It's just the kid that'll pay for your parently indolence. Congrats!


Not the whole rest of the world is as crippled as you. You'll get used to it.
2012-08-30 06:53:44 PM
1 votes:

loaba: Stop with the gender-thing already! This is a 5yr old! Crimony, people, the kid is not making a statement for the New Gay/Bi/Lesbian World Order. He's wearing a dress 'cause Mummy and Daddy made one available to him.


He's wearing one simply because it's available to him, and because he likes it. That's the entire farking point. He's not trying to make a statement. He just likes the dress. Society is making the statement here, and it's an ugly one that his father is perfectly right in opposing.
2012-08-30 06:53:37 PM
1 votes:
Teach the boy to fight. There's nothing funnier than a boy in a dress, kicking ass.
2012-08-30 06:51:55 PM
1 votes:

ParagonComplex: Your child really should outgrow the whole "I like dressing like a girl!" nonsense by the time they start school. It's really a failure of parenting. The kid's entire life will be ruined, and it's all the parent's fault. The kid needs to learn about "inside behavior" and "outside behavior". Yeah, they'll eventually get the idea that it isn't socially acceptable and stop doing it all together. That's the best thing for them. Kids can be terribly cruel for the simplest of things. Just imagine it amplified when your boy dresses like a girl. Worse yet, the kid won't really have any idea why the kids are being mean since the parent failued them.


Society has failed them not the parents.
2012-08-30 06:50:53 PM
1 votes:

HeartlessLibertarian: pounddawg:

Our 5 year old picks out his own clothes.
/not an idiot

Yes you are an idiot, if you think we would believe that lie. If your 5 year old picked out his own clothes, he'd be going to school dressed as batman. And if you let your 5 year old pick his own clothes from the store (which you don't because you're lying) you'd be a terrible parent. Since you are a blatent liar you probally are a horrible influence on your child, and your child probably be as dumb as you and a plague on society as well. 5 Year olds are not old enough to pick out a wardrobe, they can't even dress themselves. So don't lie to us you pathetic liberal piece of garbage.


You are the idiot here.

Step 1. Show a kid a shirt with a GI JOE or Barbie.
Step 2. Ask which one they want.
Step 3. Buy shirt they choose.

The kid just picked thier own clothes.
2012-08-30 06:50:37 PM
1 votes:
I didn't pick out my own clothes when I was a kid. I went to Catholic school from K-12, so my clothes everyday were my uniform and saddle shoes, but even on the weekends or over summer break.....my mom picked out my clothes. She did that until I was old enough to do my own laundry. She taught me to use the washing machine and dryer when I was 10 years old, so that's when I started picking out my own clothes to wear, especially at the store. I already knew what she wouldn't want me wearing (nothing short, nothing tight, nothing full of holes), so I didn't bother handing her anything I knew she wouldn't approve of. When I was 16 and got my first summer job, and thus my own money, I could wear whatever the hell I wanted.
2012-08-30 06:50:20 PM
1 votes:

ParagonComplex: Your child really should outgrow the whole "I like dressing like a girl!" nonsense by the time they start school.


That my only complaint about this story. The child did say to his dad that he no longer wanted to wear dresses. The father then went on to actively encourage him to continue wearing dresses. Horrible parenting from a repressed father.
2012-08-30 06:50:04 PM
1 votes:

loaba: Stop with the gender-thing already! This is a 5yr old! Crimony, people, the kid is not making a statement for the New Gay/Bi/Lesbian World Order. He's wearing a dress 'cause Mummy and Daddy made one available to him.


On the contrary, friend, we are saying that he's a five year old and gender is irrelevant and he can wear whatever he wants. You're the one saying that his gender is paramount and he shouldn't be allowed to wear clothes other children wear because of said gender.
In short, methinks you doth protest too much.
2012-08-30 06:49:22 PM
1 votes:

Theaetetus: Kiwimann:
I've had to deal with more than my fair share of jerk ass kids. They're never some sweet boy who likes dresses or nail polish. They're YOUR kids. Kudos to the dad and fark the rest of you.

Examples:
Pumpernickel bread: When he is 5, perhaps the parent should choose attire that will minimize the frequency of ass kickings.
loaba: You wanna Glam it up in high school, son? Go right ahead and when you get your ass kicked will figure it out from there.

Between the kid in a dress and those suggesting violence towards him, it's not the kid that has a problem.


Very much this. Fark amazes me sometimes.
2012-08-30 06:47:26 PM
1 votes:
When it is over 100 degrees for 21 days straight, doesn't drop below 80 overnight, I look at women wearing lightweight cotton skirt and think that looks a lot more comfortable than my pants.

I've worn a lava-lava before, in places where a lot of other men were wearing one. Wish I had the guts to make it part of my everyday attire during the summer.

Keeping my pants in the wintertime thought.
2012-08-30 06:46:42 PM
1 votes:

Gunny Highway: There is no simple answer to this question but everyone is acting like that have it.

....farking internet.


Sadly, this sums up every comment, reaction and rebuttal ever written in the history of Fark, and possibly the internet.
2012-08-30 06:45:40 PM
1 votes:
Stop with the gender-thing already! This is a 5yr old! Crimony, people, the kid is not making a statement for the New Gay/Bi/Lesbian World Order. He's wearing a dress 'cause Mummy and Daddy made one available to him.
2012-08-30 06:43:52 PM
1 votes:

ProfessorOhki: 5monkeys: I have five kids. 14, 12, 7 all girls and 4 and 2 boys. The girls dress themselves, but i buy the clothes so i use my veto power then. I let them pick at the store, bit they know i will not allow trashy. the boys get a choice. I pick out 2 or 3 things and let them pick. On holidays i dress them all. This way our stuff is all nice enough for family pictures.

Purely out of curiosity, is the difference in methodology due to the age or something else?


Age. I was the same way with the girls when they were younger. My 12 and 7 year old take the cake for best outfits worn to the store. They both at age 3 wore tutus with rain boots and sunglasses everywhere we went for a month or so. The they got over it. My 4 yr old just went through a rainboots phase too, and a beard. He looked awesome. I let them express themselves, but try to keep them from getting picked on.
2012-08-30 06:42:25 PM
1 votes:
When I was five I wore a cape and cowboy boots to school just for the record.
2012-08-30 06:40:12 PM
1 votes:

Myria: I don't understand some of the hate in this thread, nor those who think the dad is crazy for allowing his son to do this. It's very possible that the boy truly feels that he is really a girl inside.

The pain of feeling like you're the wrong gender is strong enough that it makes you think about suicide. I would know... =(


Same here, sorry for any pain you've had to go through. Stay strong. :)
2012-08-30 06:37:23 PM
1 votes:

Coco LaFemme: craig328: CrispFlows: craig328: "the would isn't a fair place son" lesson

Don't listen to "A Boy Named Sue".

You wouldn't get it.

If by that you mean "don't take parenting advice from a do-wop 45 record"...thanks but I already covered that tricky decision.

Most dads get it. The good ones anyway.

o_O

I'm sorry, did you just call Johnny Cash a "doo-wop" record? Have you even HEARD of Johnny Cash?


This. You are my Farking hero
2012-08-30 06:35:38 PM
1 votes:

Kiwimann: One time at the local park, there was a bald child playing by himself and a group of other kids playing tag with one another. My son went straight over and played with the bald kid. His mom struck up a conversation w/ my wife and said her son's been battling leukemia and that our son is the first kid to play with him in a long time. He got picked on a lot at school and the other kids would chant "Baldy" at him. She broke down crying talking about it.

Every parent here who's belittling the dad for a lack of discipline in his house... it's your kids who are the assholes out on the playground, making fun of kids not only for choices within their control, but for things completely out of their control. Not to parade around on my high horse, but they learn that stuff at home. You think it's just natural and kids being kids, but it's not. They pick up cues from you and the same way you're going after this dad like a shark smelling blood in the water, they go after his kids.

As a parent, you decide what things warrant discipline and what things don't. Just because a parent feels that their son's choice to wear a dress is fine with them does not mean there's a lack of discipline in general or that the child is running the house.

I've had to deal with more than my fair share of jerk ass kids. They're never some sweet boy who likes dresses or nail polish. They're YOUR kids. Kudos to the dad and fark the rest of you.


media.tumblr.com
2012-08-30 06:33:07 PM
1 votes:

5monkeys: I have five kids. 14, 12, 7 all girls and 4 and 2 boys. The girls dress themselves, but i buy the clothes so i use my veto power then. I let them pick at the store, bit they know i will not allow trashy. the boys get a choice. I pick out 2 or 3 things and let them pick. On holidays i dress them all. This way our stuff is all nice enough for family pictures.


Purely out of curiosity, is the difference in methodology due to the age or something else?
2012-08-30 06:31:37 PM
1 votes:

Theaetetus: ZoeNekros: Tell them that people have strange attitudes about gender norms; that other children will tease, that many will look at them funny, and some will be outright confrontational. Tell them that for now I am going to make the decisions about what they can wear to shield them from that... They may wear a dress when they're capable of responding maturely to people's teases and objections on their own.

And removing choice from someone to shield them from others sure is a mature way of responding...


Note, we are talking about removing choice from a child. We do this all the time, and should. Autonomy is not a binary thing. Responsible parents respond to their children growing up by granting them more and more decision making.
2012-08-30 06:28:06 PM
1 votes:
Ah, the little boy is going to grow up to be a lumberjack!
2012-08-30 06:27:32 PM
1 votes:

ZoeNekros: Tell them that people have strange attitudes about gender norms; that other children will tease, that many will look at them funny, and some will be outright confrontational. Tell them that for now I am going to make the decisions about what they can wear to shield them from that... They may wear a dress when they're capable of responding maturely to people's teases and objections on their own.


And removing choice from someone to shield them from others sure is a mature way of responding...
2012-08-30 06:23:51 PM
1 votes:

Myria: I don't understand some of the hate in this thread, nor those who think the dad is crazy for allowing his son to do this.


Fark.com: You will never find a more wretched hive of misogyny and despair. We must be cautious.
2012-08-30 06:20:51 PM
1 votes:
My take:
1) Gender norms are a contingent fact about people, albeit a silly one.
2) Young children choose their dress for especially idiotic reasons, such as to get attention.

My response:
Not allow the child to wear clothing on the far side of the spectrum, but while communicating to them why. Tell them that people have strange attitudes about gender norms; that other children will tease, that many will look at them funny, and some will be outright confrontational. Tell them that for now I am going to make the decisions about what they can wear to shield them from that, and to not feed their desire for attention which takes advantage of people's silly gender expectations. Tell them it doesn't bother me that they want to wear a dress, and if when they're older they still want to wear dresses I'll be fine with that. They may wear a dress when they're capable of responding maturely to people's teases and objections on their own.
2012-08-30 06:15:11 PM
1 votes:

Agent Smiths Laugh: You folks do realize that outside of certain anatomically specific items (such as bras), gender differences regarding clothing are purely social constructs with no actual meaning or purpose right?

Right?


They do mean something.
2012-08-30 06:13:48 PM
1 votes:

Agent Smiths Laugh: You folks do realize that outside of certain anatomically specific items (such as bras), gender differences regarding clothing are purely social constructs with no actual meaning or purpose right?

Right?


Listen, if we're forced to admit that gender is a social construct that we've all blindly followed without thinking about it, then this whole house of cards will collapse. All of the pressures that we caved into as children (and continue to follow as adults) in order to fit in are meaningless. If boys can wear pink skirts, such frilly, soft skirts... with little flowers on them... Oh God why mommy, why did force me to wear pants if we're just making this shiat up as we go along?!
2012-08-30 06:08:03 PM
1 votes:

spman: The thing is, unless he at some point moves, the kids he's in school with now, are mostly going to be the exact same ones he'll be going to school with until his senior year of high school. Kids are assholes, and particularly judgmental, and once you get stigmatized as a weirdo, or a nerd, or a bully, or whatever, it's damn near impossible to change other peoples opinion of you. So guess what, if you act like a weirdo in first grade, and your peers shun you and cast you out for being a weirdo, that shiats going to follow you until you leave, or you graduate High School. The impression you make on people in Kindergarten will absolutely follow you for a long, long time.


He'd get stigmatized as "that guy who wears dresses," which he could stop doing at any time he wanted. It's not personality, intelligence, body type, or anything else solidly affixed to his persona. If he's doesn't have an interesting reaction to the initial volley of mockery, they'll probably get used to it. The novelty of something so superficial doesn't have much staying power.

Maybe you just went to school with asshats or something?
2012-08-30 06:07:05 PM
1 votes:
There is no simple answer to this question but everyone is acting like that have it.

....farking internet.
2012-08-30 06:06:54 PM
1 votes:

douchebag/hater: Where is the 'Enabling Azzhole' tag when you really need it?

Or the 'Parenting Mistakes NOT To Make' one?


Or 'Ensure Your Gay Son Grows Up to Not Commit Suicide'.

Would really depend on how the kid ends up.
2012-08-30 06:04:33 PM
1 votes:

Strobeguy: How did this get a Hero tag and why does my head hurt reading the freaking article?


You played football and now suffer from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, causing you to drool on your shirt as you try to sound out words like "dress"?
2012-08-30 06:04:28 PM
1 votes:

peterquince: Or sometimes Dad needs to be the one that says "yeah, son, I know you like wearing these things, and it's okay that you do, but see, chances are the other kids won't understand and they'll treat you kind of poorly for that. That reflects on them, not you. But it's going to hurt your feelings. Why don't we pack a pair of jeans and a t-shirt in your backpack in case you change your mind at lunch."


This is both wise and sensible.
2012-08-30 06:03:50 PM
1 votes:
Eh, I'd be lying if I said I hadn't thought about wearing a dress. They look so comfortable and breezy.

I guess I could go for a kilt, but those look like they're made of thick wool, which would defeat the purpose.
2012-08-30 06:02:30 PM
1 votes:

Brick-House: And no one thought to give counciling a try?


"He's different, so something must be wrong with him!"

I bet you think you can pray away the gay, too.
2012-08-30 06:00:23 PM
1 votes:

Canned Tamales: I'm no hero, no society-changing rebel, and I admit it...but tell me, what's it like to be just a straight-up coward?


It's kind of like being called a coward by some feckless tard who thinks calling someone a name over the intawebz somehow, through the magic of conversation insult, scores them an imaginary point in some debate that means enough to them to out themselves as a clearly indolent tool.

Or, if that was too much to follow, it's kind of like the feeling you get when you exercise some parental prerogative and save your son from being a social pariah or worse because, you know, he's only 5 f*cking years old. I guess I'm being cowardly for insisting my kids eat a well balanced meal and get to bed at a decent time too?

Tell you what sport, one day, when you see a vagina again that doesn't belong to a family member and you successfully remember the sex ed classes and manage to still squirt a little in the right place and that eventually turns into a kid whom you're not barred by court order from seeing and whose upbringing you actually manage to constructively participate in...when all that comes to pass, come back here and feel free to lecture me on "cowardly".
2012-08-30 05:55:58 PM
1 votes:
The thing is, unless he at some point moves, the kids he's in school with now, are mostly going to be the exact same ones he'll be going to school with until his senior year of high school. Kids are assholes, and particularly judgmental, and once you get stigmatized as a weirdo, or a nerd, or a bully, or whatever, it's damn near impossible to change other peoples opinion of you. So guess what, if you act like a weirdo in first grade, and your peers shun you and cast you out for being a weirdo, that shiats going to follow you until you leave, or you graduate High School. The impression you make on people in Kindergarten will absolutely follow you for a long, long time.
2012-08-30 05:55:38 PM
1 votes:

Canned Tamales: I'm no hero, no society-changing rebel, and I admit it...but tell me, what's it like to be just a straight-up coward?


You are being kind of a dick in this thread. Ease up and have some tact.
2012-08-30 05:45:28 PM
1 votes:

Gunny Highway: I think a good father would explain that if you do something that is out of the ordinary it will attract attention. Some of the attention will be good and some will be bad. Choices have consequences and you need to learn to handle the good with the bad. If wearing dresses makes the kid happy that is great but dont expect everyone to handle the situation the exact same way. It may not be right but it is life.


This.

Also, it sounds like the father has actively encouraged the boy to wear dresses when the boy admitted he didn't want to because he was embarrassed. I suspect this has nothing to do with a 5 year old's choices. I suspect it's about a father living vicariously through a little boy. In which case I vote for horrible parent.
2012-08-30 05:41:31 PM
1 votes:

craig328: "the would isn't a fair place son" lesson


Don't listen to "A Boy Named Sue".

You wouldn't get it.
2012-08-30 05:36:22 PM
1 votes:

The Jami Turman Fan Club: skantea: I hope for everyone's sake the kid is actually gay, otherwise he may not appreciate this much when he's in high school and college trying to get laid.

You really think a girl's going to be turned off because you wore a skirt when you were 5?

Women love that shiat.


Absolutely they do.

/gets hit on more en femme than when in mundanes...
2012-08-30 05:36:17 PM
1 votes:

Hagenhatesyouall: Part of being a parent is to keep kids from doing stupid shiat like, say, wearing a g'damn dress to school when you're a 5 year old boy.


Part of being a mature parent is knowing which battle to fight.
2012-08-30 05:32:35 PM
1 votes:
Hero tag?

HERO?

How about a farking ZERO.

Part of being a parent is to keep kids from doing stupid shiat like, say, wearing a g'damn dress to school when you're a 5 year old boy.
2012-08-30 05:20:18 PM
1 votes:

Chunky_Charlie: The Stealth Hippopotamus: scottydoesntknow: Good for him, but that won't stop the teasing. Unfortunately, it'll probably make it worse.

that was my first thought too. My second thought was anyone who lets their 5 year old tell them how they are going to dress is an idiot.

This is a no-brainer.

It really shouldn't be that big of a deal. Let him wear whatever the fark he wants to wear. Life is about doing what makes you happy.

It seems idiotic to me that people are so petty that they would voice an opinion on what a child is or isn't wearing, or any person for that matter.


The kid should also learn that in life choices have consequences. You need to learn to deal with adversity. Should this kid wearing a dress to school be a big deal? No. Was it inevitably going to be a big deal? Yes. I'm sure the father recognized this and this is how he chose the handle it. It isnt how a majority of people would handle it though. Do what makes you happy but dont live in a fantasy world.
2012-08-30 05:15:19 PM
1 votes:
Is the kid named Zowie?

blog.ourstage.com
2012-08-30 05:14:19 PM
1 votes:

Chunky_Charlie: The Stealth Hippopotamus: scottydoesntknow: Good for him, but that won't stop the teasing. Unfortunately, it'll probably make it worse.

that was my first thought too. My second thought was anyone who lets their 5 year old tell them how they are going to dress is an idiot.

This is a no-brainer.

It really shouldn't be that big of a deal. Let him wear whatever the fark he wants to wear. Life is about doing what makes you happy.

It seems idiotic to me that people are so petty that they would voice an opinion on what a child is or isn't wearing, or any person for that matter.


I'm favoriting you just for this.
2012-08-30 05:13:21 PM
1 votes:

timujin:
And, scottydoesntknow, it seems like the kid has come up with a good response to the teasing, at least, with his, "Hey, if you and your dad aren't man enough to wear a skirt..." bit


That won't stop it at all and you know that. Like I said, the dad is trying to make the situation better, but it won't improve.

Everyone needs to know that trying to express yourself outside of societal norms will bring a lot of attention, and a good portion of that will be negative. If you can handle it then more power to you, but don't expect to be accepted just because you're "man enough to wear a skirt" as the kid puts it.
2012-08-30 05:12:40 PM
1 votes:

blender61: This gets a hero tag?
really?

I think that there would more productive ways of supporting his son than wearing a tacky skirt.


In this age of slacktivism, a wardrobe change is a pretty impressive action.
2012-08-30 05:11:25 PM
1 votes:

Gunny Highway: Most of the geek girls I know work part time and stay up until 4 a.m reading web comics.


God love them!
2012-08-30 05:11:21 PM
1 votes:

Coco LaFemme: Kids are cruel, they're stupid, and they're often times, egged on by their own parents. It would serve the parents of this child well to make him aware of that. Tell him he can wear skirts and dresses at home, around his family, but when he's at school, he has to wear pants/shorts like the other boys.


Yeah, that's my thinking too. I'm sure the kid likes wearing dresses. They're probably comfortable as hell (having never worn a dress I can't attest). My preference for clothing is basketball shorts with no shirt, but my employer frowns upon people coming to work topless, so when I go out I wear khakis and a button-down shirt. Around the house, I wear whatever the hell I want. If he wants to wear dresses at home, by all means, go for it. But he's going to be ridiculed if he wears them in public.
2012-08-30 05:10:45 PM
1 votes:
I'd say wear the dress all you want at home, son. Go crazy with it. However, when you're out in public, put on some pants unless it's kilt day or something.

I'd also teach him how to fight. He's got a long school road ahead of him, but it won't be nearly as bad as the kids who have to go through school knowing they got their arse kicked by a boy in a dress. :)
2012-08-30 05:09:37 PM
1 votes:
Hope Daddy is saving for the kids' therapy sessions.....
2012-08-30 05:09:34 PM
1 votes:

buntz: Then I think "fark them! Geek girls rule the world and this is who she is and what she loves!"


Most of the geek girls I know work part time and stay up until 4 a.m reading web comics.
2012-08-30 05:06:57 PM
1 votes:

DmGdDawg: Hero tag? Try Dumbass tag.

A good father wouldn't let his five year old son dress like a girl at school or anywhere else.


You sound like a Snowflake Hopes and Dreams Crusher. Don't you know they are supposed to be allowed to express themselves anyway they desire and that the rest of the kids must suppress their natural and normal tendency to mock and tease those who behave strangely? Get with the program! This is 2012 and we are running out of time to pussify every man on the planet.
2012-08-30 05:05:28 PM
1 votes:

Expolaris: jaylectricity: freedom

[celticwarriorkilts.com image 300x481]

There is a land where a mans balls may hang free and clear.

Conventions - Dragon*Con, Comic Con , etc. I let my boys swing with the wind while i'm rocking out with my geek out.

But seriously, good on the Dad for showing unwavering love for his kid. Even if this causes more teasing , the kid knows that he's always got his Dad to back him up. That's way more support than some transgendered adults get from their parents.


Amerikilt? I've got one of those and I where it frequently here in Cbus. Men wear kilts.
2012-08-30 05:04:03 PM
1 votes:

jim32rr: The Stealth Hippopotamus: scottydoesntknow: Good for him, but that won't stop the teasing. Unfortunately, it'll probably make it worse.

that was my first thought too. My second thought was anyone who lets their 5 year old tell them how they are going to dress is an idiot.

This.


Our 5 year old picks out his own clothes.
/not an idiot
2012-08-30 05:03:03 PM
1 votes:

The Stealth Hippopotamus: scottydoesntknow: Good for him, but that won't stop the teasing. Unfortunately, it'll probably make it worse.

that was my first thought too. My second thought was anyone who lets their 5 year old tell them how they are going to dress is an idiot.


I didn't mind my daughter picking out her clothes, but I did say no to things I didn't want her to wear. This gave her the ability to demonstrate independence, while at the same time saving me from having to guess what is fashionable for her age and gender. My only rules were they had to be acceptable to her school and no f*cking glitter. It only took one shirt with glitter to realize that all the clothes run in the same machine would also have glitter.
2012-08-30 05:02:51 PM
1 votes:
I've met a few guys who wear kilts - and not just the plaid variety from Scotland, but also nondescript solid color varieties that don't look much different from a skirt. I've been told there's a company somewhere here in California that makes them, and I would assume their client base includes a fair amount of men.

In a number of places in this state, it wouldn't raise that many eyebrows to see a man wearing a skirt that didn't look like it was specifically made for a woman. Certain dresses, on the other hand, can look silly even on women.
2012-08-30 05:02:04 PM
1 votes:

Oznog: jaylectricity: I believe in equality. Men should be able to wear dresses and skirts in all their ball-freedom glory, and women should be allowed to walk around topless.

And it should be OK to stare at either one.

[celticwarriorkilts.com image 300x481]


...kiltmind?

a57.foxnews.com
2012-08-30 05:01:54 PM
1 votes:
f0.bcbits.com
2012-08-30 05:01:52 PM
1 votes:

AlgaeRancher: get the boy a kilt and call it a day


smartest answer EVAR
2012-08-30 05:00:30 PM
1 votes:
I hope for everyone's sake the kid is actually gay, otherwise he may not appreciate this much when he's in high school and college trying to get laid.
2012-08-30 05:00:29 PM
1 votes:
The Hero tag is for the kids making fun of the little homo, right?
2012-08-30 04:57:43 PM
1 votes:
Does it really matter what your KID wears in public as long as the pedophiles don't get turned on?
2012-08-30 04:51:18 PM
1 votes:
While wearing a dress, how many 5 y/o can the dad defeat to protect his son?
2012-08-30 04:49:57 PM
1 votes:

timujin: And, scottydoesntknow, it seems like the kid has come up with a good response to the teasing, at least, with his, "Hey, if you and your dad aren't man enough to wear a skirt..." bit


Sure, sure, and a real man takes it doggy-style with no lube. :P
2012-08-30 04:46:49 PM
1 votes:
he likes skirts cause he wants to be with a woman that wears one. how gay
2012-08-30 03:45:52 PM
1 votes:
There was this guy in the late 1800s who wore dresses as a kid.. I think his name was Franklin or something. He turned out to be a total loser.

Also blue is the new pink.
 
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