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(BBC)   Researchers observe gravity waves as a pair of massive white orbs warp space. So, how's your mom doing?   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 48
    More: Interesting, gravitational wave, relative motion, Astrophysical Journal  
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9850 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Aug 2012 at 8:54 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-08-29 08:56:07 PM
Black hole comes to mind, Subby.
Why do you ask?
 
2012-08-29 08:56:57 PM
Massive white orbs? Warping space? There must be a hole in my boxers, because it sounds as though researchers are observing my testicles.
 
2012-08-29 08:57:32 PM
EIP.
 
2012-08-29 09:00:51 PM
Warp field stabilized
 
2012-08-29 09:01:18 PM
Warping space.

"Never had two words sounded so appealing," he read from the sign.
 
2012-08-29 09:02:29 PM
Thirteen minute orbits? You could actually see the stars moving.
 
2012-08-29 09:03:07 PM
24.media.tumblr.com
No comment...
 
2012-08-29 09:03:17 PM
Wouldn't the spiraling arms of the Milky Way be proof of gravity waves? It's also rather hard to spin off Milfs once you're in their gravity well. Or theirs.
 
2012-08-29 09:04:16 PM
Gravitational waves were a significant part of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, which viewed space itself as a malleable construct, and the gravity of massive objects as a force that could effectively warp it.

Okay, I'm a bit fuzzy on this stuff, but I thought the theory was that mass warped space, and gravity was the effect.
Am I wrong?
 
2012-08-29 09:05:54 PM

theorellior: Thirteen minute orbits? You could actually see the stars moving.


you'd probably spend the whole year switching the clocks back and forth from daylight savings time.
 
2012-08-29 09:15:18 PM
Now I'm hungry for Massive white orbs and gravity.

I mean mashed potatoes and gravy.
 
2012-08-29 09:16:07 PM

GhostFish: Gravitational waves were a significant part of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, which viewed space itself as a malleable construct, and the gravity of massive objects as a force that could effectively warp it.

Okay, I'm a bit fuzzy on this stuff, but I thought the theory was that mass warped space, and gravity was the effect.
Am I wrong?


http://blog.professorastronomy.com/2012/08/even-white-dwarfs-must-obe y -einstein.html

better article, seems to be something like space time friction that is not normally observable
 
2012-08-29 09:16:48 PM
All you really need is one.
fusionanomaly.net
 
2012-08-29 09:18:19 PM
Observe gravity waves? From the article, what the researchers are seeing is the effects of gravity waves, but not "gravitons" causing the waves.
 
2012-08-29 09:22:29 PM
I'd just like to point out have F'ing awesome space and astronomy is. How anyone can pay a bit of attention to Snooki or a Kadashian when all this coolness is out there and the pace of discovery has increased so much recently.

Access Hollywood and similar shows should be stricken from the airwaves and replace with reruns of Nova and Cosmos.
 
2012-08-29 09:24:59 PM
mantiseye.com
 
2012-08-29 09:26:40 PM
Do you think that lead author grad student is gonna get his doctorate?
 
2012-08-29 09:28:21 PM
Um,

yes?
 
2012-08-29 09:30:46 PM
Observing gravity waves? How about boarding-up and hanging ten?
 
2012-08-29 09:32:53 PM
Deep space.
 
2012-08-29 09:40:13 PM
www.timecube.com
 
2012-08-29 09:42:13 PM

theorellior: Thirteen minute orbits? You could actually see the stars moving.


Yeah moving as they were 3000 years ago. So it's not exactly real-time.
 
2012-08-29 09:42:26 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: [www.timecube.com image 528x359]


it's actuallyy true i dare ANYBODY to disprove it

for example:

9-11-01 - Twin Towers collapse
9-11-02 - Grieving
9-11-03 - Grieving
9-11-04 - Grieving
9-11-05 - Grieveing
9-11-06 - Grieving
9-11-07 - Grieveing
9-11-08 - Grieving
9-11-09 - Grieveing
9-11-10 - Grieving
9-11-11 - Grieveing
9-11-12 - Grieving
 
2012-08-29 09:47:51 PM

itsfullofstars: I'd just like to point out have F'ing awesome space and astronomy is. How anyone can pay a bit of attention to Snooki or a Kadashian when all this coolness is out there and the pace of discovery has increased so much recently.

Access Hollywood and similar shows should be stricken from the airwaves and replace with reruns of Nova and Cosmos.


This is 'way past cool! (I just wish Einstein could have witnessed this. But I'm sure he did in one of his many "thought experiments".)
 
2012-08-29 09:47:52 PM

GhostFish: Gravitational waves were a significant part of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, which viewed space itself as a malleable construct, and the gravity of massive objects as a force that could effectively warp it.

Okay, I'm a bit fuzzy on this stuff, but I thought the theory was that mass warped space, and gravity was the effect.
Am I wrong?


Mass does in fact warp space. But when two large enough masses orbit each other close enough space gets warped into a vortex like shape which ripples outward in the form of g-waves. Their essentially observing gravity's affect on space-time and not gravity directly.
 
2012-08-29 09:50:09 PM

Sgygus: Observe gravity waves? From the article, what the researchers are seeing is the effects of gravity waves, but not "gravitons" causing the waves.


They are observing gravity's effect on space-time not the force carying particles directly.
 
2012-08-29 09:50:13 PM

itsfullofstars: I'd just like to point out have F'ing awesome space and astronomy is. How anyone can pay a bit of attention to Snooki or a Kadashian when all this coolness is out there and the pace of discovery has increased so much recently.

Access Hollywood and similar shows should be stricken from the airwaves and replace with reruns of Nova and Cosmos.


Amen brother/sister! 

Sorry, I didn't check you profile.
 
2012-08-29 09:57:46 PM

Salem Witch: itsfullofstars: I'd just like to point out have F'ing awesome space and astronomy is. How anyone can pay a bit of attention to Snooki or a Kadashian when all this coolness is out there and the pace of discovery has increased so much recently.

Access Hollywood and similar shows should be stricken from the airwaves and replace with reruns of Nova and Cosmos.

Amen brother/sister! 

Sorry, I didn't check you profile.


But what if there were BIP?!
 
2012-08-29 09:58:27 PM

vudukungfu: Black hole comes to mind, Subby.
Why do you ask?


Yeah, that would be a different set of massive white orbs
 
2012-08-29 10:13:00 PM
Orbital period of 12.75 minutes? And it's dropped by a millisecond a year? In (considerably) less than 100,000 years, these two bodies will collide. That's an instant in astronomical terms.

What I'm wondering is by what mechanism two white dwarfs could form that close to begin with. At some point each star must have been within the other's envelope; how does (the core of) a star, flying through the atmosphere of a red giant, manage to keep enough mass gravitationally bound to itself to survive?

I suppose the first star to go red giant gets its atmosphere gets stripped off onto its companion, leaving a stellar core, the companion gains mass, burns through the extra fuel relatively quickly, and when it goes red giant, and the non-fusing hunk of carbon that was once the core of the first star somehow doesn't vaporize itself as it plows through the second star's envelope as it spirals inward (and throws the second star's loosely-bound atmosphere outward)... it still sounds like an unholy mess to even think about modeling.
 
2012-08-29 10:24:10 PM
Did someone say Orbit?
1.media.collegehumor.cvcdn.com
 
2012-08-29 10:31:54 PM
 
2012-08-29 10:33:36 PM
Gravitational waves caused by large white orbiting objects?

GOP Convention with Christie and Limbaugh?
 
2012-08-29 10:39:48 PM
no "+1 subby"?!?

/Come on that's a good headline
//No wonder subs aren't as great as they used to be
///+1 subby
 
2012-08-29 10:40:18 PM
Massive white orbs?
www.swankycelebs.com
 
2012-08-29 11:03:35 PM
news.bbcimg.co.uk
upload.wikimedia.org

Lorien?
 
2012-08-29 11:25:39 PM
Yet researchers have already proven that "gravity waves" don't exist.

There's a gigantic pipe with mirrors in the Southern US.
 
2012-08-29 11:35:32 PM

cig-mkr: Massive white orbs?
[www.swankycelebs.com image 431x500]


NASTY!
 
2012-08-30 12:12:14 AM
Two giant objects rotating around each other in close proximity causing waves,,,, hmm... I'll just let the Rosie O Donell getting married joke fill in itself.
 
2012-08-30 12:30:19 AM
I never trusted other gravity wave detection methods that I've heard about. If this works visually as a gravity wave detector, then I guess that would be pretty cool.
 
2012-08-30 01:12:31 AM
An astronomer using antiquated equipment positioned on a separate mass traveling through space has managed to measure such an acute variable that no body else has with more advanced equipment. Is this plausible?
 
2012-08-30 01:29:18 AM
fta It is the extreme nature of the pair of white dwarf stars known as J0651 - each a substantial fraction of our Sun's mass orbiting each other at a distance just a third that between the Earth and Moon - that increases the magnitude of the gravity waves.

It's exciting just trying to imagine it. I tried to read it in Carl Sagan's voice.
 
2012-08-30 01:50:34 AM

grinnel: An astronomer using antiquated equipment positioned on a separate mass traveling through space has managed to measure such an acute variable that no body else has with more advanced equipment. Is this plausible?


Don't forget about the vastness of space. It's quite possible that it was one of the few, if not only, programs looking at that particular speck of space. This speck is only 3k light years away. The older equipment should work just fine for that.
 
2012-08-30 01:59:57 AM
Wow. Astrophysicists make an amazing discovery, and Fark reacts just as I would expect. Thank you Fark.

///now, on to some science sites to see whether this is a big deal or just a hyperventilating science reporter
 
2012-08-30 02:50:26 AM
Philbb: grinnel: An astronomer using antiquated equipment positioned on a separate mass traveling through space has managed to measure such an acute variable that no body else has with more advanced equipment. Is this plausible?

Don't forget about the vastness of space. It's quite possible that it was one of the few, if not only, programs looking at that particular speck of space. This speck is only 3k light years away. The older equipment should work just fine for that.


Not sure if sarcastic? Question was legitimate. Going back to Xeno's theories of perception, if earth had shifted, or even the teutonic plates, could that skew the data through observation?
 
2012-08-30 03:25:16 AM

grinnel: Philbb: grinnel: An astronomer using antiquated equipment positioned on a separate mass traveling through space has managed to measure such an acute variable that no body else has with more advanced equipment. Is this plausible?

Don't forget about the vastness of space. It's quite possible that it was one of the few, if not only, programs looking at that particular speck of space. This speck is only 3k light years away. The older equipment should work just fine for that.

Not sure if sarcastic? Question was legitimate. Going back to Xeno's theories of perception, if earth had shifted, or even the teutonic plates, could that skew the data through observation?


Ja.
 
2012-08-30 03:35:03 AM

grinnel: if earth had shifted, or even the teutonic plates, could that skew the data through observation?


It's possible that you're imagining the apparently shared reality of the universe around you, and the telescope, and this post. But assuming that things actually exist and can be objectively measured it's fairly straightforward to correct for any local variation simply by calibrating against other well-documented objects visible in the sky.
 
2012-08-30 04:18:43 AM
It's possible that you're imagining the apparently shared reality of the universe around you, and the telescope, and this post. But assuming that things actually exist and can be objectively measured it's fairly straightforward to correct for any local variation simply by calibrating against other well-documented objects visible in the sky.

I'm imagining that at 500 yards through a 50 mm front objective 3x12 leupold scope, that while observing to have a full view, you can walk a bullet eight inches. We are talking about light years with an optical unit focused at gaseous objects which are all moving through space with fluctuations too minimal to measure in a short period of time. However, over a greater time, those minuscule measurements could add up to an at least noticeable difference. The accuracy, not precision mind you, of an 83 year old telescope over such great distances in infallible?

I am not an astronomer, the excitement in this thread seems to prove the observation of some significance, and I am just curious about how exact this could be when the article mentions, "Catching sight of an actual gravitational wave, however, is a tricky business; their effects tend to be tiny and the have so far eluded discovery in Earth-bound experiments.
 
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