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(Sun Sentinel)   Tech columnist urges his fellow Floridians to include smartphones running weather apps in their hurricane kits, since it's not like cellular networks or their connections to the Internet ever fail during hurricanes   (sun-sentinel.com) divider line 63
    More: Misc, tech, online, application software, mobile web, Weather Channel%, smartphones, storms  
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1126 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Aug 2012 at 8:36 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-25 11:31:12 AM
Good god, is subby really that farking stupid?

Forecast a55 hat, forecast.
 
2012-08-25 11:31:53 AM
If you are in the Keys or in the swamps south of Naples, you just might want to get in the car and head upstate. You don't want to be stuck on the bridge.
 
2012-08-25 11:43:26 AM
Post-Katrina story from southeast Louisiana:

Most of the cell towers had backup generators...the problem was, some of the carriers had their area-code nodes (504 and 985) in New Orleans, and were promptly flooded.

Verizon's nodes were in Baton Rouge, and working, so anyone with a Vz phone had a better chance of getting a signal.

All the carriers have since moved their nodes to 'hardened' locations north of I-12, well north of Katrina-style flooding.

csb:

Post-Katrina, I was living in Austin, and traveled back to my family's home in rural SE La. a couple of days after the storm. There is a Vz stick very nearby my parents' house in Washington Parish, and I was surprised to find that my Vz cell phone, and the Vz tower, were working fine. (Though, the tower was on reduced power, maybe a 6-mile range at best.) Vz had not yet marketed very much in that area, so I had one of the only functioning phones in the parish (county.) I ran up a $900 bill letting everyone I ran into use the phone to call out to let family know they were OK. When I later called Verizon set up an arrangement to pay the huge bill, they wiped it clean when I explained how I had incurred the charges.
 
2012-08-25 11:54:05 AM
I'm glad the people who live in hurricane zones, live in hurricane zones. Means the Big Stupids don't live out here.
 
2012-08-25 02:27:43 PM
I live in Florida. I keep a landline paid for at all times.
 
2012-08-25 02:54:03 PM
There are only a 3 companies that own and operate cell phone networks(AT&T, Sprint & I forget the other). All other carriers (e.g. Boost Mobile, T-Mobile, Cricket) lease these networks from them at cut-rate prices due to FTC regulations so as to be competitive in the market.

SMS works as long as a network is up and running. In fact, SMS doesn't cost the wireless companies
anything as messages are carried on the network as part of their normal operation. Cell towers are constantly connecting to your phone to give you a signal to use as you move about your area. These little "pinging" data packets are more then large enough to carry a text message.

This is why message size is limited to 140 characters. Any larger and they would start eating into
a network's bandwidth capability.

/the more you know
//it still pisses me off though
 
2012-08-25 04:52:08 PM
www.arrl.org

/hot
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-08-25 06:06:27 PM

Clemkadidlefark: I'm glad the people who live in hurricane zones, live in hurricane zones. Means the Big Stupids don't live out here.


I'm glad all you geniuses in flyover country live in your trailer parks. It isolates you from civilization
 
2012-08-25 08:46:24 PM

harrycary: There are only a 3 companies that own and operate cell phone networks(AT&T, Sprint & I forget the other). All other carriers (e.g. Boost Mobile, T-Mobile, Cricket) lease these networks from them at cut-rate prices due to FTC regulations so as to be competitive in the market.

SMS works as long as a network is up and running. In fact, SMS doesn't cost the wireless companies
anything as messages are carried on the network as part of their normal operation. Cell towers are constantly connecting to your phone to give you a signal to use as you move about your area. These little "pinging" data packets are more then large enough to carry a text message.

This is why message size is limited to 140 characters. Any larger and they would start eating into
a network's bandwidth capability.

/the more you know
//it still pisses me off though


T-Mobile has it's own network, but does have roaming agreements in some areas where it doesn't own the radio frequency, as do the other majors.

The more you know, indeed.



/SIL is an engineer for T-Mobile
 
2012-08-25 11:15:15 PM

Pribar: I would be happy if the idiots would do ANY planning at all


What, you don't support their god-given American right to autodarwinate?
 
2012-08-26 12:40:18 AM

Generation_D: ekdikeo4: Of course, you probably also want an old fashioned regular radio as well, probably one with a weather band, shortwave receiver, and crankpowered. There are several models out there that have all of those features.

And, frankly, you want your cell phone to be on Verizon. If you don't have Verizon, you're probably SOL when the shiat hits, or shortly thereafter, because no one else has the backup power that they do. All of Verizon's towers have at least 6 hour backups, with a large quantity of them having 12 hour or longer backup ability, and the major network infrastructure towers have their own generators. However, in the case of major road blockages, those generators do need to be manually started (at least, as of 2005, when I was in the business), so if no one can get to the towers to start them, you're going to be running on their backup batteries.

None of the other networks (at least as of 2005) could even come close to comparing in the battery and generator fallbacks, and I seriously doubt that they've even given it any upgrades.

During the east coast power failure in 2003, my Verizon phone was still working 2 days in, everyone else's phones were completely dead within 4-6 hours at most.

Thank you Verizon employee. You're right, nobody ever upgrades networks in 7 years, VZB is totally the best network in all areas of the country bar none.


Not a verizon employee, and have been out of the business for 7 years. No other carrier even remotely had a concern for their backup systems, and it's been proven a few times since then - 9/11, Katrina.

I'm just calling it where I see it -- from a user standpoint, if you're in a location where you're likely to face severe and extended power failures, you want a phone that works.
 
2012-08-26 10:56:41 AM
Actually during our two most recent disasters - the hurricane last year and the Blizzard the year before - our cell networks not only kept us up and sane, but worked the entire time. Charging the devices was not a problem with a small inductive charger and a few batteries.
 
2012-08-26 12:59:57 PM

vicejay: Post-Katrina story from southeast Louisiana:

Most of the cell towers had backup generators...the problem was, some of the carriers had their area-code nodes (504 and 985) in New Orleans, and were promptly flooded.

Verizon's nodes were in Baton Rouge, and working, so anyone with a Vz phone had a better chance of getting a signal.

All the carriers have since moved their nodes to 'hardened' locations north of I-12, well north of Katrina-style flooding.

csb:

Post-Katrina, I was living in Austin, and traveled back to my family's home in rural SE La. a couple of days after the storm. There is a Vz stick very nearby my parents' house in Washington Parish, and I was surprised to find that my Vz cell phone, and the Vz tower, were working fine. (Though, the tower was on reduced power, maybe a 6-mile range at best.) Vz had not yet marketed very much in that area, so I had one of the only functioning phones in the parish (county.) I ran up a $900 bill letting everyone I ran into use the phone to call out to let family know they were OK. When I later called Verizon set up an arrangement to pay the huge bill, they wiped it clean when I explained how I had incurred the charges.


That's a very encouraging story. Good on you.

/After 9/11, when the phone networks were down in NY and my roomie's mother's cell was the only one working, that phone call home was the most important thing to me.
 
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