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(Infographics Only)   Coolest graphic of every hurricane since 1851 you will see today   (infographicsonly.com) divider line 36
    More: Cool, infographics  
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7558 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Aug 2012 at 12:18 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-24 07:45:46 PM  
That is a nice map, but seemingly a very odd projection of the earth. Can someone explain how the continents have been displayed?
 
2012-08-24 08:03:09 PM  

RoyBatty: That is a nice map, but seemingly a very odd projection of the earth. Can someone explain how the continents have been displayed?


It's a stereographic projection using the south pole as the origin. Basically it's one of the ways to try and overcome the problem associated with projecting a 3-dimensional sphere onto a 2-dimensional surface.
 
2012-08-24 08:48:44 PM  
I had long been curious as to why never heard about hurricanes south of the equator. According to this, there have been a fair number in the Pacific, but almost nothing in the Atlantic. Why is this? Is the water of the south Atlantic colder than the north?
 
2012-08-24 09:07:26 PM  

miss diminutive: RoyBatty: That is a nice map, but seemingly a very odd projection of the earth. Can someone explain how the continents have been displayed?

It's a stereographic projection using the south pole as the origin. Basically it's one of the ways to try and overcome the problem associated with projecting a 3-dimensional sphere onto a 2-dimensional surface.


Thank you. I can see the stereographic projection and that explains Antarctica's size compared to what I see on Google Earth, it is still somewhat intriguing how it portrays North America wrt. South America.
 
2012-08-24 09:39:57 PM  
It's an eye of shape... why are hurricanes looking at me?
 
2012-08-24 09:41:40 PM  
I can feel you tracking me. Stop it. that's weird.
 
2012-08-24 09:45:06 PM  

sno man: It's an eye of shape... why are hurricanes looking at me?


of may be optional in your English...
 
2012-08-24 10:02:48 PM  
God really hates the Gulf of Mexico.
 
2012-08-24 11:43:20 PM  
INCEPTION
 
2012-08-25 12:32:27 AM  

minoridiot: God really hates the Gulf of Mexico.


Well yeah, Florida and Texas... and poor Louisiana is caught in the middle.
 
2012-08-25 12:52:46 AM  

Slives: I had long been curious as to why never heard about hurricanes south of the equator. According to this, there have been a fair number in the Pacific, but almost nothing in the Atlantic. Why is this? Is the water of the south Atlantic colder than the north?


The majority of Atlantic hurricanes are formed from tropical waves that are spawned over the Sahara desert and pushed west by prevailing winds. There is no such trigger in the southern hemisphere, so less hurricanes in the south Atlantic.

Not to say there are never hurricanes south of the equator, Australia gets hit on a regular basis.
 
2012-08-25 01:09:59 AM  

DarthBart: Not to say there are never hurricanes south of the equator, Australia gets hit on a regular basis.


They're venomous, too.
 
2012-08-25 01:40:44 AM  
That map took me awhile to to place everything but pretty cool.
 
2012-08-25 01:55:05 AM  
Note the track of the one and only known major tropical cyclone ("hurricane" strength) to form in the South Atlantic. This is a recent event and it has been suggested that climate change may have contributed to its occurence. 500 years of exploration and shipping suggest that this storm was nearly unique, so storms like this one ought to remain very rare, with most tropical cyclones in the South Atlantic being rarer and weaker than those elsewhere.

According to Wikipedia, strong wind sheer and the lack of significant weather disturbances makes strong tropical cyclones quite rare in the South Atlantic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Atlantic_tropical_cyclone

Wind sheer may also be the reason that global warming is not increasing the number of hurricanes significantly--despite warmer waters, the increase in wind sheer disrupts storm formation and acts to suppress storm formation. Climatologists expect bigger hurricanes exploiting the energy of warmer waters, but not a great increase in the number of hurricanes and cyclones. All that extra heat has to go somewhere, and it naturally flows down the temperature gradient. But as it increases, it flattens the gradient, which may mitigate some effects and worsen others.

The thing to remember is that the speed matters as much as the magnitude and direction of change: sudden changes are harder to adapt to--for example, a recent study shows that the West Antarctic peninsula has experienced spells of warmth as warm and warmer than today, but the result seems to have been quite different because the time scale was much longer.

I suspect it is like washing a tumbler with a very thick base in very hot water--the glass may crack or shatter because the difference in temperature in the thick part of the glass can't be diffused away fast enough. The thin lip of the glass can cope better with a sudden change of temperature because it is thin and thus can radiate the heat away quickly and evenly.

The ice sheets are collapsing in West Antartica at temperatures that are lower than some past warming episodes. We know this because the data is from cores taken in the ice sheets themselves. If they had collapsed in past warmings, the ice wouldn't be there to record the past warmings. The material in which a hole forms is always older than the hole. The doughnut is always older than the doughnut hole.
 
2012-08-25 02:09:43 AM  

minoridiot: God really hates the Gulf of Mexico.


And Satan hates the Pacific side. Basically, Mexico's hosed.
 
2012-08-25 02:12:24 AM  
Have to say I wasn't expecting quite that level of coolness.
 
2012-08-25 02:16:37 AM  

miss diminutive: RoyBatty: That is a nice map, but seemingly a very odd projection of the earth. Can someone explain how the continents have been displayed?

It's a stereographic projection using the south pole as the origin. Basically it's one of the ways to try and overcome the problem associated with projecting a 3-dimensional sphere onto a 2-dimensional surface.


Here is an article including a quote from the mapmaker, who thought this showed the storms' paths better than a rectangular projection did. I'm not so sure about that, but this is the first map I've seen that shows the latitude bands of tropical cyclones without interruption.
 
2012-08-25 02:25:16 AM  

HighZoolander: minoridiot: God really hates the Gulf of Mexico.

And Satan hates the Pacific side. Basically, Mexico's hosed.


Some of that is due to the projection used. The scale increases rapidly with distance from the South Pole, which minimizes the extent of storms in the Southern Hemisphere. For example, the large area of scattered points on the right side of the map (recurving hurricanes in the North Atlantic) is actually comparable to the area of scattered points above and to the left of Antarctica.

Some more of that is because the North Atlantic has historically had more sea traffic than most other hurricane-prone seas, so a greater percentage of storms was spotted (and plotted).
 
2012-08-25 02:54:53 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: Here is an article including a quote from the mapmaker, who thought this showed the storms' paths better than a rectangular projection did. I'm not so sure about that, but this is the first map I've seen that shows the latitude bands of tropical cyclones without interruption.


Thanks, his other maps of US Fires and World Earthquakes are also enlightening.

Right now, my desktop, across several screens, is a projection of the earth, with MODIS clouds somehow mapped across them (but I think it's fake).

I'd love to have the desktop monitoring twitter and add to the desktop display hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes as they are happening.

Somewhat pissed, somewhat glad that Google hasn't launched satellites yet.
 
2012-08-25 03:00:52 AM  
Once I figured out the orientation, this image was cooler than I expected. Nice find, subby!
 
2012-08-25 03:14:48 AM  
My one point of confusion is there isn't a way to accurately keep track of what dot belongs to what hurricane, in that vein what is their method for using multiple dots? Placement of the eye at 12 noon?
 
2012-08-25 03:43:08 AM  

Lunchlady: My one point of confusion is there isn't a way to accurately keep track of what dot belongs to what hurricane, in that vein what is their method for using multiple dots? Placement of the eye at 12 noon?


Based on the tracks near Hawaii, it looks like every 6 hours (at least for recent storms), which matches the standard reporting cycle.

The NOAA database from which this map is drawn is here. Individual storm tracks are sorted by year, but the record is incomplete. The only full hurricane known to strike California (in 1858) is missing, for example, and storms from most of the world outside of the North Atlantic were underreported before the satellite era.
 
2012-08-25 03:51:11 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: Lunchlady: My one point of confusion is there isn't a way to accurately keep track of what dot belongs to what hurricane, in that vein what is their method for using multiple dots? Placement of the eye at 12 noon?

Based on the tracks near Hawaii, it looks like every 6 hours (at least for recent storms), which matches the standard reporting cycle.

The NOAA database from which this map is drawn is here. Individual storm tracks are sorted by year, but the record is incomplete. The only full hurricane known to strike California (in 1858) is missing, for example, and storms from most of the world outside of the North Atlantic were underreported before the satellite era.


Ah. Ok, that makes sense. Thanks.
 
2012-08-25 08:07:40 AM  
I see they included the one southern Atlantic case off the coast of South America. People still argue about whether that one actually counts or not.
 
2012-08-25 10:24:22 AM  
This is quite possibly the worst way I have ever seen the Earth represented.
 
2012-08-25 10:31:02 AM  
I saw a sail boat.
 
2012-08-25 10:38:16 AM  

wildstarr: This is quite possibly the worst way I have ever seen the Earth represented.


If you want to see the land, you plot from the north pole. If you want to see the ocean, you plot from the south pole.

The water and land hemispheres aren't quite centered on the poles (the center of the land hemisphere is in Nantes, France), but it's close enough.
 
2012-08-25 12:25:27 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: HighZoolander: minoridiot: God really hates the Gulf of Mexico.

And Satan hates the Pacific side. Basically, Mexico's hosed.

Some of that is due to the projection used. The scale increases rapidly with distance from the South Pole, which minimizes the extent of storms in the Southern Hemisphere. For example, the large area of scattered points on the right side of the map (recurving hurricanes in the North Atlantic) is actually comparable to the area of scattered points above and to the left of Antarctica.

Some more of that is because the North Atlantic has historically had more sea traffic than most other hurricane-prone seas, so a greater percentage of storms was spotted (and plotted).


???
 
2012-08-25 12:39:14 PM  
That map rocks! You could even say it rocks me like a... ummm... well, like something I can't think of right now...
 
2012-08-25 01:28:45 PM  
One Antarticane!
 
2012-08-25 02:23:52 PM  
Lived through several of those storms too. Born and raised on the gulf coast and don't miss them, especially after 3 weeks without power after Ivan in 2005
/now live in vegas where the weather report may as well be a recording.
 
2012-08-25 03:46:38 PM  

HighZoolander: common sense is an oxymoron: HighZoolander: minoridiot: God really hates the Gulf of Mexico.

And Satan hates the Pacific side. Basically, Mexico's hosed.

Some of that is due to the projection used. The scale increases rapidly with distance from the South Pole, which minimizes the extent of storms in the Southern Hemisphere. For example, the large area of scattered points on the right side of the map (recurving hurricanes in the North Atlantic) is actually comparable to the area of scattered points above and to the left of Antarctica.

Some more of that is because the North Atlantic has historically had more sea traffic than most other hurricane-prone seas, so a greater percentage of storms was spotted (and plotted).

???


On the map, the biggest hurricane hot spot appears to be the Gulf of Mexico/North Atlantic area, except that this is an artifact caused by both sampling bias and a map projection where scale increases rapidly with distance from the South Pole.
 
2012-08-25 09:42:56 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: HighZoolander: common sense is an oxymoron: HighZoolander: minoridiot: God really hates the Gulf of Mexico.

And Satan hates the Pacific side. Basically, Mexico's hosed.

Some of that is due to the projection used. The scale increases rapidly with distance from the South Pole, which minimizes the extent of storms in the Southern Hemisphere. For example, the large area of scattered points on the right side of the map (recurving hurricanes in the North Atlantic) is actually comparable to the area of scattered points above and to the left of Antarctica.

Some more of that is because the North Atlantic has historically had more sea traffic than most other hurricane-prone seas, so a greater percentage of storms was spotted (and plotted).

???

On the map, the biggest hurricane hot spot appears to be the Gulf of Mexico/North Atlantic area, except that this is an artifact caused by both sampling bias and a map projection where scale increases rapidly with distance from the South Pole.


I understood that part, just didn't immediately see how it followed from my comment that Mexico was hosed - and come on, I should get some credit for that awful pun :)

And even though your response makes sense to me in hindsight - that is, even if other places are hosed more or just as much - Mexico is still all wet (except for the really dry parts, I guess)
 
2012-08-25 11:55:01 PM  

Slives: I had long been curious as to why never heard about hurricanes south of the equator. According to this, there have been a fair number in the Pacific, but almost nothing in the Atlantic. Why is this? Is the water of the south Atlantic colder than the north?


It was my understanding that the Earth's rotation is what produces Hurricanes to begin with. That's why Northern Hemisphere Hurricanes rotate one way and Southeren Hemisphere Hurricains rotate the other. Being too close to the equator messes up the rotation of Hurricanes so they rarely get near it. That's the way it's been described to me anyway and it may be wrong. I've lived in Florida all my life and it's rare to see Hurricanes form near the equator or maintain intensity when they get too close.
 
2012-08-26 01:11:04 AM  

Slives: I had long been curious as to why never heard about hurricanes south of the equator. According to this, there have been a fair number in the Pacific, but almost nothing in the Atlantic. Why is this? Is the water of the south Atlantic colder than the north?


It's not the water temperature. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ICTZ), is generally displaced to the north of the geographic equator in the Atlantic, so tropical waves in the North Atlantic are closer to a source of atmospheric support for development into hurricanes than their southern counterparts are. Additionally (and possibly related), the amount of wind shear is greater in the South Atlantic, which prevents storms from growing deep enough to develop into hurricanes.
 
2012-08-28 08:58:24 AM  
Hey, look at all he places you can live and never have a hurricane!
 
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