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(Marketwatch)   Being of sound mind and body, I bequeath my iTunes library to my son Reed. --Steve Jobs.... Wait, I can't do that?   (marketwatch.com) divider line 23
    More: Interesting, digital books, iTunes  
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3902 clicks; posted to Business » on 24 Aug 2012 at 12:52 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-08-24 12:57:18 PM
My will is gonna state that I want my hard drives thermited anyway, so I'm not worried.
 
2012-08-24 12:58:15 PM
Yo ho yo ho.......
 
2012-08-24 12:59:51 PM
You can bequeath that which you paid the iron price to aquire
 
2012-08-24 01:06:15 PM
Avoid this problem by simply pirating all of your media.
 
2012-08-24 01:10:18 PM
That's actually an interesting question. The underlying problems are the main reasons I haven't jumped on the e-book bandwagon.

With digital media, you don't own anything, you just rent it.
 
2012-08-24 01:35:26 PM
I don't own an I-anything. I'm certainly not interested in storing files online for a fee -- when the courts broke the assured privacy laws promoted by early ISPs in order to view their customer records.

The Wikileaks came along, blabbing government secrets to the world and there's ALWAYS some hacker who manages to get into secure databases to steal and sell customer information.

Congress is probably already halfway through legislation cutting new laws to get into secure online file vaults -- under the excuse the pedophiles will hide their millions of porn images of kids on them.

Pardon my ignorance, but wasn't there a time that if you bough music for your iphone-player-pad whatthehellever, that the license would expire and the music erase itself after a set time? Plus, it can't be copied. (At least not from an I-whatever.)

I have a stack of vinyl records from the 60s and 70s. I OWN them. I can do whatever I want with them. I have over 2500 printed books and I OWN them and can do as I please with each one. Some of the books are nearly 100 years old. A few older.

When hurricanes hit and knock out the power for several days, I can read my books by candle light and not worry about conserving batteries. I can drop a book off a cliff, go down, pick it up and still read it. My heirs can inherit my books. I've managed to buy out of print, hard cover books I loved as a kid in second grade which you'll never find online in code.

A couple of my books aren't very valuable now, but in about 100 years they will be. I suspect a 100 year old Kindle will not even work and none of the technology of the time will be able to read the codes the books it contains are written in. (Programs I bought when PC's first hit the market can't be run on current machines.)

It's still too early with digital technology to feel safe with online security and ownership is questionable when you use another companies software to store stuff. Far too many hackers out there exploiting the system and far too many lawyers figuring out ways to make it so you actually do not own that $300 software you bought and installed.

BTW. Music CDs are going the way of the vinyl record already.
 
2012-08-24 01:36:05 PM
Any music I buy is stored on my PC hard drive. Once a month, I back up everything on my hard drive to an external hard drive. If I die, my heirs take the hard drive and divvy everything up. As for books, it would seem that the person that has my kindle gets everything on it.
 
2012-08-24 02:03:47 PM
My movies and music ripped from my CD's or bought legally are usually cracked or ripped by me for backup but Today, these are wanted by the RIAA, if they survive. and If you want entertainment..if found no where else..and if you can find them...maybe you can listen to ...My Hard drive.
 
2012-08-24 02:04:30 PM
eBooks don't get bought unless they can be neutered. And we neuter and archive them with the music and family photos. *WE'RE STILL BUYING EBOOKS*, publishers. Haven't torrented anything we couldn't buy. We just refuse to be locked in.

I do log in under my late dad's name once a year to update his 'lifetime free map updates' on his still-good-enough Garmin. Not really that necessary now that I have GPS-enabled smartphones... mostly just kinda nostalgic.
 
2012-08-24 02:19:21 PM
I never buy anything with DRM. Ever.

You can legally buy music from Amazon in mp3's and that's what I do.
 
2012-08-24 02:49:13 PM

Rik01: I don't own an I-anything. I'm certainly not interested in storing files online for a fee -- when the courts broke the assured privacy laws promoted by early ISPs in order to view their customer records.

The Wikileaks came along, blabbing government secrets to the world and there's ALWAYS some hacker who manages to get into secure databases to steal and sell customer information.

Congress is probably already halfway through legislation cutting new laws to get into secure online file vaults -- under the excuse the pedophiles will hide their millions of porn images of kids on them.

Pardon my ignorance, but wasn't there a time that if you bough music for your iphone-player-pad whatthehellever, that the license would expire and the music erase itself after a set time? Plus, it can't be copied. (At least not from an I-whatever.)

I have a stack of vinyl records from the 60s and 70s. I OWN them. I can do whatever I want with them. I have over 2500 printed books and I OWN them and can do as I please with each one. Some of the books are nearly 100 years old. A few older.

When hurricanes hit and knock out the power for several days, I can read my books by candle light and not worry about conserving batteries. I can drop a book off a cliff, go down, pick it up and still read it. My heirs can inherit my books. I've managed to buy out of print, hard cover books I loved as a kid in second grade which you'll never find online in code.

A couple of my books aren't very valuable now, but in about 100 years they will be. I suspect a 100 year old Kindle will not even work and none of the technology of the time will be able to read the codes the books it contains are written in. (Programs I bought when PC's first hit the market can't be run on current machines.)

It's still too early with digital technology to feel safe with online security and ownership is questionable when you use another companies software to store stuff. Far too many hackers out there exploiting the system and ...

 


So you're a Luddite who doesn't understand how data works, or the rest of technology for that matter.

Got it.

/either don't buy data bound by DRM, or remove that DRM after purchase
//backups, backups, backups
///and batteries? please... that issue was tired years ago.
 
2012-08-24 02:54:29 PM
rememberthemulekites.files.wordpress.com

Rip. Mix. BURRRNNNNNNNN!!!!
 
2012-08-24 03:03:52 PM

Rik01: have a stack of vinyl records from the 60s and 70s. I OWN them. I can do whatever I want with them. I have over 2500 printed books and I OWN them and can do as I please with each one. Some of the books are nearly 100 years old. A few older.


Aren't you cute :-). You own a hunk of vinyl and some stacks of paper. You own your media in the same sense that I do. Only I don't have to bother with trivialities like physical media. I can read my books anywhere. I can listen to my music any time.

When will you dinosaurs figure out that physical media BINDS you. Digital sets you free. And yet, you stand there lording your shackles over me. Congratulations. You're King Luddite.
 
2012-08-24 03:37:45 PM
I remember recording vinyl to cassette and my uncle telling me it was illegal.
 
2012-08-24 03:38:35 PM
Considering itunes music hasn't had DRM for nearly the last four years, this isn't exactly the most interesting issue. 

And if you're planning to download enough ebooks and movies that you're concerned that your heirs will give a crap about your media collection, maybe (1) it's time to admit you have a problem and (2) put your passwords in your will.
 
2012-08-24 04:03:29 PM
Ownership laws written in most countries has not kept up with the times. As such, an Individuals Digital Rights Act should negate these "digital licenses" and instead confer actual digital ownership of the file, such that if you lose it you get another copy. Because it's all just inexpensive copies.
 
2012-08-24 05:11:40 PM

bojon: I remember recording vinyl to cassette and my uncle telling me it was illegal.



Me and my dad used to go to the library, rent a ton of vinyl records, and tape them.  We were old school pirates!
 
2012-08-24 07:47:12 PM
I think when 64gb microSDs get cheap, I'm going to leave copies of my entire library in random locations.

Nothing I own has any DRM on it.
 
2012-08-24 09:55:06 PM
What these so-called lawyers are missing is that the industry crafts the licensing terms specifically to prevent this. Sure you strip away the DRM but if the license says it is non-transferable then unless that specifically breaks the law, it means that it can't be transferred.

It will be interesting to see how the RIAA decides to take these guys down. Buying exclusive rights to the software and refusing to license it to anyone? Sue them for unlawful interference in a business contract? Injecting a few hundred thousand "pirated" songs onto their computers and going after them for copyright infringement?
 
2012-08-25 03:35:59 AM
Honest Bender

Aren't you cute :-). You own a hunk of vinyl and some stacks of paper. You own your media in the same sense that I do. Only I don't have to bother with trivialities like physical media. I can read my books anywhere. I can listen to my music any time.

When will you dinosaurs figure out that physical media BINDS you. Digital sets you free. And yet, you stand there lording your shackles over me. Congratulations. You're King Luddite.


Remind me of that in another 25 years when nothing on your ipod will work on the newer version. Save data on CD? In about the same time, your laptop will not be able to read it. Memory stick? Same thing.

I went through Hurricanes Janeen (SP) and Katrina and did without power for about a month. (I did have a generator, but that's NOT the point.) Within a week all heavily used battery operated devices failed unless they could find some place to recharge. Your PC and laptop is kept 'alive' by a small battery in the motherboard. If that dies, you'll loose tons of stuff kept in active memory and can't replace it by popping in a new battery. The battery is recharged so long as your PC is powered up, even if turned off.

I have tons of stuff on backup Cds. I used to have tons of stuff on those mini-disks -- which computers still have drives for. However, my upgraded OS can't read the stuff from the 80's and the drive, so I've heard, is being phased out.

I have flash drives. They have a limited life time. Some can only be overwritten 500 times before they fail. I just picked up an 86 gigabyte palm sized, portable drive that can be re-written over as many times as a normal drive.

However, in about 20 years, it's operating system might not be recognized by the new machines.

One of my books is over 100 years old and I can still read it and look at the images it contains. The technology changed for it also. It is printed on linen paper, which can last hundreds of years. Current books are printed on acid washed pulp paper to reduce the cost and maybe will last 50 years before crumbling.

Now, I have a couple of computers and a cell. I think the technology is great. However, I'm aware of the many flaws and the entirely new way it enabled businesses, governments and anyone else to track you, find out your personal information and get deep into your private business. Some cells and computers with cameras can be remotely activated without you knowing it.

You probably don't recall that tech show, several years back, where these guys showed how, with a laptop and a cheaply bought converter, they could drive through any development, locate wireless security cams which were on and peer into people's houses. Baby monitors were the easiest.

My security cams are hard wired and NOT connected to the internet. My cell has no camera.

I have a record made back in the early 50's, which plays at 78 rpm and still have a turn table that can play it. Even though my home has modern conveniences, I still stock gas lamps, candles, camp stoves and flares. I have several crank powered flash lights.

One thing I've learned is that modern technology can fail at any time, so it's best to keep some old, reliable technology around.

However, I do enjoy my laptop and will probably be upgrading it soon for more memory and speed. I also enjoy my PC, which has greater speed and a bigger monitor.

Every damn year one or the other has to go into the shop one or more times to get viruses removed or glitches fixed and I run a couple of over priced security programs on both.

It also chaps my arse that I wear the blasted letters off the keys when, my first computer ages ago, had them ETCHED into the tops and you could buy universal keys for a couple of bucks a bag. NOW, you can pay $5 a key to replace it, depending on what system you own and many use priority instead of universally designed keys.
Only THEIR keys will fit your keyboard. So, like printer ink, they can charge you a bundle to replace them.

BTW. The keys on my old electric typewriter NEVER wore the letters off.
 
2012-08-25 06:46:26 AM

Rik01: Remind me of that in another 25 years when nothing on your ipod will work on the newer version. Save data on CD? In about the same time, your laptop will not be able to read it. Memory stick? Same thing.


Actually, all my data is digital and stored on hard drives. I don't "store" my music on my MP3 player. It's copied over. I haven't used a CD in my personal life in nearly a decade. I'll see you in 25 years to play some music for you.

Your PC and laptop is kept 'alive' by a small battery in the motherboard. If that dies, you'll loose tons of stuff kept in active memory and can't replace it by popping in a new battery. The battery is recharged so long as your PC is powered up, even if turned off.

Dude, wtf are you talking about. The CMOS battery just keeps your system clock and BIOS settings stored. It has literally nothing to do with anything you are talking about.

However, in about 20 years, it's operating system might not be recognized by the new machines.

Your flash drive/external hard drive doesn't have an operating system. In 20 years, as long as there are still USB devices, you will be able to read those devices. Though, in those 20 years I don't know why you wouldn't move the data to a newer medium (newer hard drive or memory stick, etc).

One of my books is over 100 years old and I can still read it and look at the images it contains. The technology changed for it also. It is printed on linen paper, which can last hundreds of years. Current books are printed on acid washed pulp paper to reduce the cost and maybe will last 50 years before crumbling.

My books are printed on 1's and 0's. They'll be readable forever.

My security cams are hard wired and NOT connected to the internet. My cell has no camera.

I have a background in IT security. I know what's possible and what's probable. You're starting to sound less like a techno-rube and more like a paranoid conspiracy theorist. It's not very hard to secure your electronics.

Every damn year one or the other has to go into the shop one or more times to get viruses removed or glitches fixed and I run a couple of over priced security programs on both.

Aaaand my suspicions are confirmed. I'll try not to be mean about it, but you don't know enough about computers to contribute to this conversation.

It also chaps my arse that I wear the blasted letters off the keys when, my first computer ages ago, had them ETCHED into the tops and you could buy universal keys for a couple of bucks a bag. NOW, you can pay $5 a key to replace it, depending on what system you own and many use priority instead of universally designed keys.
Only THEIR keys will fit your keyboard. So, like printer ink, they can charge you a bundle to replace them.


Am I being trolled? This has gotten seriously off topic, but whatevs. I'm a big freakin' nerd. I'm pretty much always at my computer. I've never worn off the lettering on my keyboard. Certainly not enough so to warrant looking into replacement keys. They seriously sell replacement keys? Why? A generic keyboard is, like, $10.

And who needs the labels anyway? Do you have to look at the keyboard when you type?

Please get educated about computers. Your paranoid and mistrusting of computers in a way that is entirely the fault of your ignorance. You've got a death grip on physical media because everything else scares you to death. There's nothing to be afraid of. Come into the light.
 
2012-08-26 08:38:42 AM
Just leave them your login info. Problem solved.
 
2012-08-26 08:44:29 PM

Rik01: I don't own an I-anything. I'm certainly not interested in storing files online for a fee -- when the courts broke the assured privacy laws promoted by early ISPs in order to view their customer records.

The Wikileaks came along, blabbing government secrets to the world and there's ALWAYS some hacker who manages to get into secure databases to steal and sell customer information.

Congress is probably already halfway through legislation cutting new laws to get into secure online file vaults -- under the excuse the pedophiles will hide their millions of porn images of kids on them.

Pardon my ignorance, but wasn't there a time that if you bough music for your iphone-player-pad whatthehellever, that the license would expire and the music erase itself after a set time? Plus, it can't be copied. (At least not from an I-whatever.)

I have a stack of vinyl records from the 60s and 70s. I OWN them. I can do whatever I want with them. I have over 2500 printed books and I OWN them and can do as I please with each one. Some of the books are nearly 100 years old. A few older.

When hurricanes hit and knock out the power for several days, I can read my books by candle light and not worry about conserving batteries. I can drop a book off a cliff, go down, pick it up and still read it. My heirs can inherit my books. I've managed to buy out of print, hard cover books I loved as a kid in second grade which you'll never find online in code.

A couple of my books aren't very valuable now, but in about 100 years they will be. I suspect a 100 year old Kindle will not even work and none of the technology of the time will be able to read the codes the books it contains are written in. (Programs I bought when PC's first hit the market can't be run on current machines.)

It's still too early with digital technology to feel safe with online security and ownership is questionable when you use another companies software to store stuff. Far too many hackers out there exploiting the system and ...


Even if you bought your music on CD you still don't own it. You own the right to play that music and you own the physical medium on which it's stored.
 
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