Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Columbia Daily Tribune)   Champion bur oak tree around since the 1600's showing stress from the drought, so farmer hauls 1,600 gallons of water a week from the river to water it   (columbiatribune.com) divider line 59
    More: Hero, Champion bur oak, Missouri River, average surface temperature, farmers, chronic stress  
•       •       •

12892 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Aug 2012 at 5:29 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



59 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-08-23 11:49:17 PM  
there's a 200 year old monster out in the hills behind my parent's house. i guess 200 at least. farkin' HUGE bur oak either way.
 
2012-08-24 12:29:27 AM  
Don't let the city know about it, they'll ban it.
 
2012-08-24 04:02:13 AM  
Burr.
 
2012-08-24 04:29:23 AM  
The drought is drying up pastures and cropland, driving prices higher and making it difficult to find feed for livestock, said Melissa Haley of Bourn Feed & Supply in Columbia.

- So the price of grains and feed will go up? That's bad.

The cost of maintaining herds through the winter could force many to sell animals they would have otherwise kept for breeding, Haley said.

- But the price of meat will drop? That's good.

Usually at this time of year, grazing livestock would be in pastures, and farmers would be mowing hay to use over the winter. Instead, Haley said, many farmers are feeding hay because pasturelands are no longer viable.

- So the meat will be all thin and gamey? That's bad.

Hay that usually sells for $35 to $40 a bale can cost $100 if it can be found, Haley said. Part of the problem is the drought is so widespread that there are no surplus supplies. Bourn does not sell hay, but it does sell the supplements and substitutes that are added to the normal feed.

- But the meat will be full of supplements and essential proteins and vitamins? That's good.

"It makes me cringe every time I tell somebody their feed bill," she said. "It is not good for us; it is not good for them; it is not good for anybody."


- So the supplements contain potassium benzoate? Is that bad?
 
2012-08-24 05:32:50 AM  
It's a farking tree. It's not like it's in the amazon with natives swinging from it.
 
2012-08-24 05:36:20 AM  
....And the way the universe usually works, the day the drought finally ends, the tree will get hit by lightning.
 
2012-08-24 05:38:54 AM  
The tree is 400 years old, i think its weathered a drought or two...
 
2012-08-24 05:41:05 AM  
Loser Hamilton oak tree chopped down for firewood.
 
2012-08-24 05:43:05 AM  

miss diminutive: The drought is drying up pastures and cropland, driving prices higher and making it difficult to find feed for livestock, said Melissa Haley of Bourn Feed & Supply in Columbia.

- So the price of grains and feed will go up? That's bad.

The cost of maintaining herds through the winter could force many to sell animals they would have otherwise kept for breeding, Haley said.

- But the price of meat will drop? That's good.

Usually at this time of year, grazing livestock would be in pastures, and farmers would be mowing hay to use over the winter. Instead, Haley said, many farmers are feeding hay because pasturelands are no longer viable.

- So the meat will be all thin and gamey? That's bad.

Hay that usually sells for $35 to $40 a bale can cost $100 if it can be found, Haley said. Part of the problem is the drought is so widespread that there are no surplus supplies. Bourn does not sell hay, but it does sell the supplements and substitutes that are added to the normal feed.

- But the meat will be full of supplements and essential proteins and vitamins? That's good.

"It makes me cringe every time I tell somebody their feed bill," she said. "It is not good for us; it is not good for them; it is not good for anybody."

- So the supplements contain potassium benzoate? Is that bad?


Can I go now?

/very well done!
 
2012-08-24 06:05:00 AM  
The sappy tag could've worked as well
 
2012-08-24 06:05:15 AM  

miss diminutive: - But the price of meat will drop? That's good.


Don't count on it, especially next year when there isn't as much livestock to go around and the price of corn will still be high which will affect a lot of other things other than just corn and meat.
 
2012-08-24 06:06:11 AM  
Wait, I recall that you're REALLY not supposed to drive heavy vehicles over a tree's roots, as it can damage the roots.

850 gal=6,800 lbs on a dual axle(!)  and he's parked right over it.
 
2012-08-24 06:11:02 AM  
Bur oaks grow readily here in Central Texas without supplemental watering. This man's watering is more than excessive.
 
2012-08-24 06:19:22 AM  
Hay that usually sells for $35 to $40 a bale can cost $100 if it can be found, Haley said. Part of the problem is the drought is so widespread that there are no surplus supplies. Bourn does not sell hay, but it does sell the supplements and substitutes that are added to the normal feed.

Human greed. It's a wonderful thing, isn't it?
 
2012-08-24 06:20:20 AM  

Oznog: Wait, I recall that you're REALLY not supposed to drive heavy vehicles over a tree's roots, as it can damage the roots.

850 gal=6,800 lbs on a dual axle(!)  and he's parked right over it.


That would mean nothing could drive anywhere... Tree roots have been known to extend for as much as 1/2 mile outward just below the surface, if in fact not ON the surface. People drive over them all the time.without even knowing, or causing any damage. That doesn't count the taps that can go down several thousand feet on trees that old.
 
2012-08-24 06:58:40 AM  

Oznog: Wait, I recall that you're REALLY not supposed to drive heavy vehicles over a tree's roots, as it can damage the roots.

850 gal=6,800 lbs on a dual axle(!)  and he's parked right over it.


Lone Star Tarheel: Bur oaks grow readily here in Central Texas without supplemental watering. This man's watering is more than excessive.


Yeah, it might be smarter to hook up a pump and just run it for a couple of hours a week instead of waiting until it starts looking stressed out and then driving over the roots while simultaneously dumping 1700 gallons of water on it.
 
2012-08-24 07:12:43 AM  

Omahawg: there's a 200 year old monster out in the hills behind my parent's house. i guess 200 at least. farkin' HUGE bur oak either way.




MONSTER? DOES IT EAT COOKIES??
 
2012-08-24 07:26:35 AM  
Umm yeah.... next time try watering out where the drip line. You know, where the roots are.

coatestree.com
 
2012-08-24 07:38:50 AM  
AARONCHAMPION BURR



theinspirationroom.com
 
2012-08-24 07:53:17 AM  

thismomentinblackhistory


Burr.


You sound cold.
 
2012-08-24 07:53:32 AM  
Appropriate use of HERO tag.

R.I.P. Raymond Burr.
 
2012-08-24 07:56:20 AM  
Didn't see a yellow ribbon on the old oak tree.
 
2012-08-24 08:10:53 AM  
And on this day, the Ents were happy.
 
2012-08-24 08:33:32 AM  
I'm pretty sure putting a paved road a few feet away from it isn't doing it any good either.
 
2012-08-24 08:35:18 AM  

robohobo: It's a farking tree. It's not like it's in the amazon with natives swinging from it.


Yeah but there could be Millennials swinging from it.
 
2012-08-24 08:36:46 AM  
Trees can outlive us 10:1 it seems. I wonder if I have an opinion about that.
 
2012-08-24 08:37:40 AM  
Is not impressed
 
2012-08-24 08:38:18 AM  
Let's try that again...

is not impressed: Link
 
2012-08-24 08:45:59 AM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: Hay that usually sells for $35 to $40 a bale can cost $100 if it can be found, Haley said. Part of the problem is the drought is so widespread that there are no surplus supplies. Bourn does not sell hay, but it does sell the supplements and substitutes that are added to the normal feed.

Human greed. It's a wonderful thing, isn't it?


Much of the hay is being shipped in from places where the drought is less severe.  Costs money to do that.  
 
2012-08-24 08:51:04 AM  

Snowflake Tubbybottom: Umm yeah.... next time try watering out where the drip line. You know, where the roots are.

[coatestree.com image 763x561]


Excellent point. Also waiting all summer and then dumping 1600 gal of water on the tree once probably had little effect. When the ground becomes too dry, the soil tends to shrink, pulling away from the roots. Until the soil is rehydrated, the tree cannot absorb the water. So most of that water just wicked away before the tree could use it. The correct method for watering a drought-stressed tree is slow drip irrigation over several days.
 
2012-08-24 08:51:56 AM  
So this guy's a hero but people who protest abortion clinics are batshiat crazy?
 
2012-08-24 09:01:10 AM  

Cyno01: The tree is 400 years old, i think its weathered a drought or two...


No, no such thing as drought before Algore christened this hockey stick chart era upon us.
 
2012-08-24 09:01:27 AM  
This would be criminal activity in Oregon, Colorado, and a few other places, no?
 
2012-08-24 09:10:37 AM  

Lone Star Tarheel: Bur oaks grow readily here in Central Texas without supplemental watering. This man's watering is more than excessive.


His is the Largest of it's kind. A Champion Tree. The only ones I've seen close to that large in Austin, San Antonio, and Fredricksburg have been near a water source. The one in Austin is on private ranch land next door to the Austin Zoo. It sits next to a spring, getting water when nothing else is.

Austin Oak that sits on a spring.
img23.imageshack.us
 
2012-08-24 09:14:00 AM  

JackieRabbit: Snowflake Tubbybottom: Umm yeah.... next time try watering out where the drip line. You know, where the roots are.

[coatestree.com image 763x561]

Excellent point. Also waiting all summer and then dumping 1600 gal of water on the tree once probably had little effect. When the ground becomes too dry, the soil tends to shrink, pulling away from the roots. Until the soil is rehydrated, the tree cannot absorb the water. So most of that water just wicked away before the tree could use it. The correct method for watering a drought-stressed tree is slow drip irrigation over several days.


When you dump that much, you are saturating the area and your soil is puffed up again. If he were standing there with a garden hose each evening, I would agree, but he is saturating that ground. He's doing just fine.
 
2012-08-24 09:23:42 AM  
.....thereby overwatering the tree, leading to anaerobic soil conditions in addition to creating an environment that favors root diseases like Phytophthora while simultaneously compacting the soil to a 'fair thee well' with greater than 6 1/2 tons of water (in addition to the weight of the truck, trailer and tank). Memorial services for the tree to be held next spring.
 
2012-08-24 09:31:58 AM  
I too am in Austin, this area, and Texas in general has lost hundreds of millions of trees in the last few years. A lot of them are undesirable invasive trees, but a good chunk of them are these mature trees that have survived a lot over the years. No one wants to lose these big trees if they can prevent it.

A lot of the water restrictions would punish this type of thing, we even have people inside of Austin drilling their own wells just so they can tell the city to eat it.
 
2012-08-24 09:39:29 AM  
He was just appeasing the god that lives in the scarecrow nearby. It was that or murder a passing couple
 
2012-08-24 09:43:03 AM  

santadog: JackieRabbit: Snowflake Tubbybottom: Umm yeah.... next time try watering out where the drip line. You know, where the roots are.

[coatestree.com image 763x561]

Excellent point. Also waiting all summer and then dumping 1600 gal of water on the tree once probably had little effect. When the ground becomes too dry, the soil tends to shrink, pulling away from the roots. Until the soil is rehydrated, the tree cannot absorb the water. So most of that water just wicked away before the tree could use it. The correct method for watering a drought-stressed tree is slow drip irrigation over several days.

When you dump that much, you are saturating the area and your soil is puffed up again. If he were standing there with a garden hose each evening, I would agree, but he is saturating that ground. He's doing just fine.


When you dump that much on very dry ground very quickly, it does not saturate the soil. The water will wick away very quickly, before the tree can absorb very much of it or before the soil can sufficiently "puff up". It would take probably 100 times that amount of water to saturate the area under the canopy to the depth of the roots. Look at a tree. The root system is at least the size of the canopy.

He doesn't have to stand there with a water hose each evening. He's a farmer and he should know how to improvise a drip irrigation system. He probably has everything he needs in his equipment shed.

But what he did was probably not necessary in the first place. As someone else wrote, the tree has been through many droughts in its life. Most trees - and oaks in particular - are well adapted to tolerate drought. They may become stressed during a drought, but it takes a very long drought to kill them. They can partially shut down and minimize photosynthesis. Oaks will also do something rather remarkable when stressed by drought. This man can expect a bumper-crop of acorns. Stressed oaks increase acorn production as a species survival tactic. The parent tree may die, but not before producing a lot of offspring.
 
2012-08-24 09:45:29 AM  
i290.photobucket.com

Hey Republicans, one of your own is watering a tree.
www.spscriptorium.com

GET HIM!!!!


/Sounds pretty stupid right?
//That's because it is true.
///Good for him for doing something about it.
////Slashies
 
2012-08-24 09:46:04 AM  
i live outside of austin, and have my own well, and coincidentally, tell the city of austin to eat it at every imaginable turn.
 
2012-08-24 10:07:12 AM  

soakitincider: i live outside of austin, and have my own well, and coincidentally, tell the city of austin to eat it at every imaginable turn.


Why do you want Austin to eat your well?
 
2012-08-24 10:25:47 AM  
i290.photobucket.com

looks like somebody really had to take a leak.
 
2012-08-24 10:26:32 AM  

robohobo: It's a farking tree. It's not like it's in the amazon with natives swinging from it.


It texas. I'm sure at some point, they did have people swinging from it. Very likely, some natives.
 
2012-08-24 10:31:31 AM  
Don't know why i wrote Texas. In any case, It still applies in Missouri.
 
2012-08-24 10:32:37 AM  

jeffmw: So this guy's a hero but people who protest abortion clinics are batshiat crazy?


yes.
 
2012-08-24 10:42:16 AM  
 
2012-08-24 11:54:48 AM  

JackieRabbit: santadog: JackieRabbit: Snowflake Tubbybottom: Umm yeah.... next time try watering out where the drip line. You know, where the roots are.

[coatestree.com image 763x561]

Excellent point. Also waiting all summer and then dumping 1600 gal of water on the tree once probably had little effect. When the ground becomes too dry, the soil tends to shrink, pulling away from the roots. Until the soil is rehydrated, the tree cannot absorb the water. So most of that water just wicked away before the tree could use it. The correct method for watering a drought-stressed tree is slow drip irrigation over several days.

When you dump that much, you are saturating the area and your soil is puffed up again. If he were standing there with a garden hose each evening, I would agree, but he is saturating that ground. He's doing just fine.

When you dump that much on very dry ground very quickly, it does not saturate the soil. The water will wick away very quickly, before the tree can absorb very much of it or before the soil can sufficiently "puff up". It would take probably 100 times that amount of water to saturate the area under the canopy to the depth of the roots. Look at a tree. The root system is at least the size of the canopy.

He doesn't have to stand there with a water hose each evening. He's a farmer and he should know how to improvise a drip irrigation system. He probably has everything he needs in his equipment shed.

But what he did was probably not necessary in the first place. As someone else wrote, the tree has been through many droughts in its life. Most trees - and oaks in particular - are well adapted to tolerate drought. They may become stressed during a drought, but it takes a very long drought to kill them. They can partially shut down and minimize photosynthesis. Oaks will also do something rather remarkable when stressed by drought. This man can expect a bumper-crop of acorns. Stressed oaks increase acorn production as a species survival ...


The article said it aborted the acorns this season because of the stress.
 
2012-08-24 12:18:38 PM  
It is a beautiful tree

ts4.mm.bing.net
 
2012-08-24 12:37:55 PM  
I know John Sam Williamson and he is a good guy. He is a successfull farmer and is active in many, many community efforts. He is not even slightly crazy, except for the Republican part (he is what used to be known as a moderate). The tree is a beautiful sight and can be visited from the Katy Trail State Park--a rails-to-trail State Park which is close to 240 miles long from St.Charles, MO to Clinton, MO. We've had a very severe drought here. Trees both large and small are dying all around Missouri. John Sam will keep this one alive despite the purist protestations of the Fark Urbanarborist Club Keelhaulers.
 
Displayed 50 of 59 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report