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(The Daily Beast)   "There is no small amount of irony in conservative populists invoking Martin Luther King...it's easy to forget that Dr. King was once reviled as a Communist and a threat to America"   (thedailybeast.com) divider line 47
    More: Interesting, Dr. King, John Avlon, civil rights era, civil rights movement, George Albert Hammes  
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624 clicks; posted to Politics » on 23 Aug 2012 at 11:09 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-23 10:14:19 AM  
Just because he was wrong on something things doesn't mean he was wrong on everything.
 
2012-08-23 11:14:17 AM  
Anti-Gay marriage = Anti-Interracial Marriage.

Anyone who invokes Dr. King and supports the GOP needs to learn history. Well most conservatives need to learn history.
 
2012-08-23 11:15:36 AM  
Haters be Hatin'
 
2012-08-23 11:16:28 AM  
I think you'll find most right-wingers have opinions that have been handed to them by an authority figure, without any research or questioning.
 
2012-08-23 11:17:18 AM  

clevershark: I think you'll find most right-wingers have opinions that have been handed to them by an authority figure, without any research or questioning.


Party Above Country
 
2012-08-23 11:18:29 AM  
Dr King has the distinction of being one of the few people harassed by both the FBI and the KGB.

The former thought he was a communist agent and troublemaker, the latter thought he was too pacifist to cause problems.
 
2012-08-23 11:20:15 AM  
static.politifact.com.s3.amazonaws.com

So vote Republican!
 
2012-08-23 11:20:29 AM  
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a RINO
 
2012-08-23 11:21:08 AM  
Nothing scares the parasitic 1% more than the idea of a poor peoples campaign like MLK was gonna pull off just before he got assassinated ( just a coincidence I'm sure ).

Btw the king family won their 1999 trial to prove that the US military and organized crime conspired to kill King. Oh you mean you missed all the headlines informing you about that. That must be because not a single Msm organization covered that story.
 
2012-08-23 11:21:20 AM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Just because he was wrong on something things doesn't mean he was wrong on everything.


Was he wrong?

See, that has to be established first. I'm not making a claim either way. Not familiar enough with the subject.

Remember, these people belong to the same political party that fought King the first go-around. They fought directly against his movement, but are now praising that same movement that they tried to stop.

They're shiat-heels, is what I'm saying.
 
2012-08-23 11:22:10 AM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Just because he was wrong on something things doesn't mean he was wrong on everything.


I wasn't aware the modern GOP looked upon anything Dr King did with anything other than disdain.

Civil disobedience and non-violence? That doesn't jive with the 2nd Amendment crowd.
Civil Rights mandated by the Federal Government? Well hello state's rights bigots, how are you!
Being Black? Oh right, he was, indeed, a black man.
 
2012-08-23 11:23:04 AM  

Mantour: So vote Republican!


Don't forget MLK's participation in Operation Breadbasket, which was an affirmative action program.
 
2012-08-23 11:24:33 AM  
After Civil Rights laws were passed, King in his later life changed his focus from race to class issues. He saw that the poor and middle class were being kept down by the rich. When he changed his positions to focus on this, he was mostly ignored in the press.

Link
 
2012-08-23 11:24:38 AM  

Cinaed: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Just because he was wrong on something things doesn't mean he was wrong on everything.

I wasn't aware the modern GOP looked upon anything Dr King did with anything other than disdain.

Civil disobedience and non-violence? That doesn't jive with the 2nd Amendment crowd.
Civil Rights mandated by the Federal Government? Well hello state's rights bigots, how are you!
Being Black? Oh right, he was, indeed, a black man.


moops: Mantour: So vote Republican!

Don't forget MLK's participation in Operation Breadbasket, which was an affirmative action program.


And his opposition to the War in Vietnam.
 
2012-08-23 11:24:48 AM  
"When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why they are poor, they call me a communist." - Helder Camara

Advocate any action to help the poor that goes beyond suggesting that they get jobs or providing nominal support for food and shelter through a church and you're considered a threat to the United States.

MLK made the mistake of suggesting that we had a Christian duty to fight poverty. Racism may become passe but pissing in the eyes of the poor will never go out of fashion.
 
2012-08-23 11:25:16 AM  
Link (copy paste): https://www.commondreams.org/archive/2007/04/04/304
 
2012-08-23 11:25:42 AM  
He also worked to remove literacy tests from polling places, thereby opening the doors to voter fraud.
 
2012-08-23 11:25:54 AM  

Philip Francis Queeg: Cinaed: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Just because he was wrong on something things doesn't mean he was wrong on everything.

I wasn't aware the modern GOP looked upon anything Dr King did with anything other than disdain.

Civil disobedience and non-violence? That doesn't jive with the 2nd Amendment crowd.
Civil Rights mandated by the Federal Government? Well hello state's rights bigots, how are you!
Being Black? Oh right, he was, indeed, a black man.

moops: Mantour: So vote Republican!

Don't forget MLK's participation in Operation Breadbasket, which was an affirmative action program.

And his opposition to the War in Vietnam.


And his support for unions.

But yeah he would fit right in with today's GOP. (Rolls eyes)
 
2012-08-23 11:26:25 AM  
One of most bizarre, mind-blowing pieces of propaganda I have ever seen was the time that Glenn Beck had MLK's granddaughter on his show to explain that whenever King referred to "social justice," he really meant getting rid of government handouts and forcing people to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. Oh, and tax cuts.

/ I watched it at an airport bar while waiting for a connecting flight. Don't judge me.
 
2012-08-23 11:27:58 AM  

Cinaed: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Just because he was wrong on something things doesn't mean he was wrong on everything.

I wasn't aware the modern GOP looked upon anything Dr King did with anything other than disdain.

Civil disobedience and non-violence? That doesn't jive with the 2nd Amendment crowd.
Civil Rights mandated by the Federal Government? Well hello state's rights bigots, how are you!
Being Black? Oh right, he was, indeed, a black man.


Plus he was always playing the race card.
 
2012-08-23 11:28:42 AM  
The real question I have is; Do conservatives really believe that Dr. King was a GOP type?
 
2012-08-23 11:28:54 AM  
DOCTOR MLK Jr was an elitist, postgraduate, indoctrinated product of the intelectual class. And he never held office! He was a community organizer!
 
2012-08-23 11:30:50 AM  

razrez75: The real question I have is; Do conservatives really believe that Dr. King was a GOP type?


They don't care. All they have to do is say "Abraham Lincoln was a Republican, Frederick Douglass was a Republican, Martin Luther King was a Republican, The Klan were all Democrats!" and the rank and file will need no more thought to smugly parrot that bullshiat and pat themselves on the back.
 
2012-08-23 11:31:28 AM  

bdMurray: He also worked to remove literacy tests from polling places, thereby opening the doors to voter fraud.


He also worked to desegregate lunch counters, leading to counters' overuse and a shift to tables.
 
2012-08-23 11:31:48 AM  

Mantour: [static.politifact.com.s3.amazonaws.com image 450x300]

So vote Republican!


That's got to be the most depressing billboard I've seen. Not just because it's King, but for the head-in-ass logic used.

"Peter North has a penis. So do I. Therefore, you should totally go out with me."
 
2012-08-23 11:33:46 AM  

Martian_Astronomer: One of most bizarre, mind-blowing pieces of propaganda I have ever seen was the time that Glenn Beck had MLK's granddaughter on his show to explain that whenever King referred to "social justice," he really meant getting rid of government handouts and forcing people to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. Oh, and tax cuts.

/ I watched it at an airport bar while waiting for a connecting flight. Don't judge me.


"I am now convinced that the simplest approach will prove to be the most effective -- the solution to poverty is to abolish it directly by a now widely discussed measure: the guaranteed income."

Glenn Beck is Mayor of Oppositeland
 
2012-08-23 11:35:55 AM  
Just 50 years ago, the fault lines of American politics were still influenced by the battles of the Civil War. The South voted straight Democrat from 1860 to 1960 because the Republican Party was the Party of Lincoln.

This is important to know, the next time your Republican buddy tries to tell you 'Republicans aren't racist, even MLK senior was a Republican.'. Of course, they ignore the fact that this shiat has flip flopped in the last 45 years or so.
 
2012-08-23 11:38:06 AM  

indylaw: razrez75: The real question I have is; Do conservatives really believe that Dr. King was a GOP type?

They don't care. All they have to do is say "Abraham Lincoln was a Republican, Frederick Douglass was a Republican, Martin Luther King was a Republican, The Klan were all Democrats!" and the rank and file will need no more thought to smugly parrot that bullshiat and pat themselves on the back.


I guess that answers my question. It's a shame that our educational system is in such a sad state that half of the electorate won't question an equivocation between Glen Beck and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

It's staggering.
 
2012-08-23 11:40:38 AM  
Satire presents the best view of how MLK would be treated today and it come from a cartoon called the Boondocks return of the king. You have to admire the speech at the end.
 
2012-08-23 11:41:16 AM  

Mikey1969: Just 50 years ago, the fault lines of American politics were still influenced by the battles of the Civil War. The South voted straight Democrat from 1860 to 1960 because the Republican Party was the Party of Lincoln.

This is important to know, the next time your Republican buddy tries to tell you 'Republicans aren't racist, even MLK senior was a Republican.'. Of course, they ignore the fact that this shiat has flip flopped in the last 45 years or so.


Hell, just bring up Strom Thurmond, who was a Democrat right up to the time when the Democratic Party dropped the racist elements of their platform and the Republicans took up the slack. His famous ad against Jimmy Carter made the point that Carter might be *from* the South but he's not *of* the South (i.e. He wasn't complicit in keeping the darkies in their place).
 
2012-08-23 12:01:10 PM  
They already forget what they had him asssassinated for?
 
2012-08-23 12:02:29 PM  
img94.imageshack.us
 
2012-08-23 12:21:10 PM  

indylaw: MLK made the mistake of suggesting that we had a Christian duty to fight poverty. Racism may become passe but pissing in the eyes of the poor will never go out of fashion.


He also suggested that perhaps it was immoral to send young men off to die in foreign wars with huge numbers of civilian casualties that dragged on for years with no clear objective.

That apparently never goes out of fashion either.
 
2012-08-23 01:26:04 PM  
The first black man elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first woman elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first President (T.R.) to have a black man to the white House for dinner as a guest was a Republican.
More Republicans (as a percentage holding seats in Congress) voted for the 1964 Civil rights Act than Democrats.

This should be the legacy of the Republicans

People in the modern Republican Party have forgotten this.

But, then again, so have the Democrats.
 
2012-08-23 01:26:56 PM  
Martin Luther King Jr. was NOT a conservative or a Republican.


"Now what are some of the domestic consequences of the war in Vietnam? It has made the Great Society a myth and replaced it with a troubled and confused society.

The war has strengthened domestic reaction. It has given the extreme right, the anti-labor, anti-Negro, and anti-humanistic forces a weapon of spurious patriotism to galvanize its supporters into reaching for power, right up to the White House. It hopes to use national frustration to take control and restore the America of social insecurity and power for the privileged. When a Hollywood performer [Ronald Reagan], lacking distinction even as an actor can become a leading war hawk candidate for the Presidency, only the irrationalities induced by a war psychosis can explain such a melancholy turn of events." - Martin Luther King Jr.

"The Republican Party geared its appeal and program to racism, reaction, and extremism. All people of goodwill viewed with alarm and concern the frenzied wedding at the Cow Palace of the KKK with the radical right. The best man at this ceremony was a senator [Barry Goldwater] whose voting record, philosophy, and program were anathema to all the hard-won achievements of the past decade." - Martin Luther King Jr.


"Although King never publicly supported a political party or candidate for president, in a letter to a civil rights supporter in October 1956 he said that he was undecided as to whether he would vote for the Adlai Stevenson or Dwight Eisenhower, but that 'In the past I always voted the Democratic ticket.'
In his autobiography, King says that in 1960 he privately voted for Democratic candidate John F. Kennedy: 'I felt that Kennedy would make the best president. I never came out with an endorsement. My father did, but I never made one.' King adds that he likely would have made an exception to his non-endorsement policy in 1964, saying 'Had President Kennedy lived, I would probably have endorsed him in 1964.'"
 
2012-08-23 01:27:55 PM  
 
2012-08-23 01:41:02 PM  
I've always felt that the reason the Right is so freaked out over Obama is that he is symbolic of King's dream - that all men would be judged by the content of their character and not the color of their skin. That a blah man has what it takes to reach the pinnacle of power scares the shiat out of them.

It means It is no longer enough to simply be white. The playing field is becoming more level, and now they actually might have to compete. It is driving them batshiat crazy.

"I know you've taken it in the teeth out there, but the first guy through the wall. It always gets bloody, always. It's the threat of not just the way of doing business, but in their minds it's threatening the game. But really what it's threatening is their livelihoods, it's threatening their jobs, it's threatening the way that they do things. And every time that happens, whether it's the government or a way of doing business or whatever it is, the people are holding the reins, have their hands on the switch. They go bat shiat crazy." - John Henry in "Moneyball"
 
2012-08-23 01:46:35 PM  
Strom Thurmond was a Democrat, until the civil rights movement. Then he became a Republican.
 
2012-08-23 02:17:31 PM  

Bob16: Nothing scares the parasitic 1% more than the idea of a poor peoples campaign like MLK was gonna pull off just before he got assassinated ( just a coincidence I'm sure ).


That's the interesting thing about King that most people forget and the reason he was in Memphis in the first place: he'd come to realize that the Civil Rights struggle was really a class struggle rather than a race struggle, and supporting the (mostly black) sanitation worker's union was the first step in moving toward fighting for the poor in America instead of just fighting for (mostly poor) blacks,

/Even his own associates didn't understand what MLK was up to.
 
2012-08-23 02:55:00 PM  

sugar_fetus: The first black man elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first woman elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first President (T.R.) to have a black man to the white House for dinner as a guest was a Republican.
More Republicans (as a percentage holding seats in Congress) voted for the 1964 Civil rights Act than Democrats.

This should be the legacy of the Republicans

People in the modern Republican Party have forgotten this.

But, then again, so have the Democrats.


Learn some history.

Link
 
2012-08-23 02:58:10 PM  

Mikey1969: Just 50 years ago, the fault lines of American politics were still influenced by the battles of the Civil War. The South voted straight Democrat from 1860 to 1960 because the Republican Party was the Party of Lincoln.

This is important to know, the next time your Republican buddy tries to tell you 'Republicans aren't racist, even MLK senior was a Republican.'. Of course, they ignore the fact that this shiat has flip flopped in the last 45 years or so.


They even ignore how Jesse Helms fought against the King holiday in the 80s:

Indeed, it was conventional wisdom in Washington at the time that Jesse Helms had committed political suicide by his opposition to the King holiday and that he was certain to lose re-election the following year against a challenge by Democratic Governor James B. Hunt. In fact, Sen. Helms was trailing in the pools prior to the controversy over the holiday. The Washington Post carried a story shortly after the vote on the holiday bill with the headline, "Battle to Block King Holiday May Have Hurt Helms at Home," and a former political reporter from North Carolina confidently gloated in the Post on October 23 that Helms was "Destined to Lose in '84."

In the event, of course, Sen. Helms was re-elected by a healthy margin, and the Post itself acknowledged the role of his opposition to the King holiday as a major factor in his political revival. As Post reporter Bill Peterson wrote in news stories after Helms' re-election on November 6, 1984, his "standing among whites . . . shot up in polls after he led a filibuster against a bill establishing a national holiday on the birthday of the late Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.," and on November 18, "A poll before the filibuster showed Helms trailing Hunt by 20 percentage points. By October, Hunt's lead was sliced in half. White voters who had been feeling doubts about Helms began returning to the fold." If Sen. Helms' speech against the King holiday had any enduring effect, then, it was to help re-elect him to the Senate.


Link
 
2012-08-23 03:31:06 PM  

HighOnCraic: sugar_fetus: The first black man elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first woman elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first President (T.R.) to have a black man to the white House for dinner as a guest was a Republican.
More Republicans (as a percentage holding seats in Congress) voted for the 1964 Civil rights Act than Democrats.

This should be the legacy of the Republicans

People in the modern Republican Party have forgotten this.

But, then again, so have the Democrats.

Learn some history.

Link


I do know history. More than you, probably.

Whats your point?
 
2012-08-23 03:56:08 PM  

sugar_fetus: HighOnCraic: sugar_fetus: The first black man elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first woman elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first President (T.R.) to have a black man to the white House for dinner as a guest was a Republican.
More Republicans (as a percentage holding seats in Congress) voted for the 1964 Civil rights Act than Democrats.

This should be the legacy of the Republicans

People in the modern Republican Party have forgotten this.

But, then again, so have the Democrats.

Learn some history.

Link

I do know history. More than you, probably.

Whats your point?


There was a time when the Republican contained a significant portion of liberal, Northeasterners (the "Rockefeller Republicans"). They were the Republicans who supported civil rights. Black voting patterns began to change in the 1930s. One of the initial steps in the shift was when Herbert Hoover tried to appoint a judge to the Supreme Court named John Parker, who stated, while campaigning in North Carolina, that the Republican Party had no interest in pursuing the black vote in the South, and his appointment was blocked partially do to protests from the NAACP. The Roosevelts made important strides in bringing black voters into the Democratic Party.

From wiki:
In June 1941 Roosevelt issued Executive Order 8802, which created the Fair Employment Practices Committee (FEPC). It was the most important federal move in support of the rights of African-Americans between Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The President's order stated that the federal government would not hire any person based on their race, color, creed, or national origin. The FEPC enforced the order to ban discriminatory hiring within the federal government and in corporations that received federal contracts. Millions of blacks and women achieved better jobs and better pay as a result. The war brought the race issue to the forefront. The Army and Navy had been segregated since the Civil War. But by 1940 the African-American vote had largely shifted from Republican to Democrat, and African-American leaders like Walter White of the NAACP and T. Arnold Hill of the Urban League had become recognized as part of the Roosevelt coalition. In June 1941, at the urging of A. Philip Randolph, the leading African-American trade unionist, Roosevelt signed an executive order establishing the Fair Employment Practice Commission and prohibiting discrimination by any government agency, including the armed forces. In practice the services, particularly the Navy and the Marines, found ways to evade this order - the Marine Corps remained all-white until 1943. In September 1942, at Eleanor's instigation, Roosevelt met with a delegation of African-American leaders, who demanded full integration into the forces, including the right to serve in combat roles and in the Navy, the Marine Corps and the United States Army Air Forces. Roosevelt agreed, but then did nothing to implement his promise. It was left to his successor, Harry S. Truman, to fully desegregate the armed forces.

I think FDR was a bit weak on certain civil rights issues, but mainly he acted out of fear that if he pushed too far, the Southern wing of the Democratic Party would split off. That's pretty much what actually happened eventually. Strom Thurmond made a third-party run in '48 because the Democrats included a strong civil rights plank in their platform at the convention.

Look at the vote for the Civil Rights Act by party and region...

Note: "Southern", as used in this section, refers to members of Congress from the eleven states that made up the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War. "Northern" refers to members from the other 39 states, regardless of the geographic location of those states.

The original House version:

Southern Democrats: 7-87 (7-93%)
Southern Republicans: 0-10 (0-100%)

Northern Democrats: 145-9 (94-6%)
Northern Republicans: 138-24 (85-15%)

The Senate version:

Southern Democrats: 1-20 (5-95%)
Southern Republicans: 0-1 (0-100%)
Northern Democrats: 45-1 (98-2%)
Northern Republicans: 27-5 (84-16%)

Every time someone on the right whines about the horrible acts of those Southern Democrats of the past, they should remember where those awful Southern Democrats ended up.

"From now on, the Republicans are never going to get more than 10 to 20 percent of the Negro vote and they don't need any more than that... but Republicans would be shortsighted if they weakened enforcement of the Voting Rights Act. The more Negroes who register as Democrats in the South, the sooner the Negrophobe whites will quit the Democrats and become Republicans. That's where the votes are. Without that prodding from the blacks, the whites will backslide into their old comfortable arrangement with the local Democrats."

Link
 
2012-08-23 04:11:32 PM  

sugar_fetus: HighOnCraic: sugar_fetus: The first black man elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first woman elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first President (T.R.) to have a black man to the white House for dinner as a guest was a Republican.
More Republicans (as a percentage holding seats in Congress) voted for the 1964 Civil rights Act than Democrats.

This should be the legacy of the Republicans

People in the modern Republican Party have forgotten this.

But, then again, so have the Democrats.

Learn some history.

Link

I do know history. More than you, probably.

Whats your point?


BUCHANAN: Well, I agree, I mean, I'll tell you why many African- Americans vote Democratic is because, you know, the federal government stopped, ended slavery, it ended segregation, it supported civil rights, supports affirmative action. But the Feds did that and they tend to believe in the federal government as a good, powerful positive institution, it's on our side. And Hannity and Buchanan and these guys are constantly knocking it, and that's why we are against them. So, that's an understandable position. But what I'm saying is it is a realistic statement to say that that's going to be the future as well.

Link

Some Republicans gave up on winning the African-American vote, looking the other way or trying to benefit politically from racial polarization," Mehlman said at the annual convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. "I am here today as the Republican chairman to tell you we were wrong."

Link

Writing in 1957 in defense of jury nullification of federal voting laws, Buckley insisted that whites in the South were "entitled to take such measures as are necessary to prevail, politically and culturally, where they do not prevail numerically," because the white race was "for the time being, the advanced race." In 2004, asked whether he'd ever taken a position he now regretted, he said: "Yes. I once believed we could evolve our way up from Jim Crow. I was wrong: federal intervention was necessary."

Link

"Conservatives should feel some embarrassment and shame that we are outraged at instances of racism now that it is easy to be. Conservatives...were often at best MIA on the issue of civil rights in the 1960s. Liberals were on the right side of history on the issue of race. And conservatives should probably admit that more often."

--Jonah Goldberg

Link

"Let me say first that one of the gravest mistakes the Reagan administration made was its failure to lead aggressively in civil rights. It cost the Republican Party.

None of us in the conservative wing of the party appreciated the degree to which we were sending the signal to African-Americans that we inadequately appreciated their fears of resegregation and of being deprived of their rights which they've held for less than a generation.

All Americans owe liberalism a great debt for having fought so passionately to end segregation. The liberal commitment to ending segregation and the colonization of the Third World are liberalism's two great contributions to the 20th century. And they often did that in the face of conservative indifference or hostility."

--Newt Gingrich

Link

/Links are in another thread. I'm to lazy and shiftless to re-copy them.
//But yeah, there's a reason the modern Republican Party has forgotten about the fact they used to get the majority of the black vote, before they took Goldwater's advice and started "hunting where the ducks are."

http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/2748017?uid=8199776&uid=3739832 & uid=2129&uid=2&uid=70&uid=4&uid=62&uid=3739256&sid=21100999016223
 
2012-08-23 05:33:27 PM  

sugar_fetus: The first black man elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first woman elected to Congress was a Republican.
The first President (T.R.) to have a black man to the white House for dinner as a guest was a Republican.
More Republicans (as a percentage holding seats in Congress) voted for the 1964 Civil rights Act than Democrats.

This should be the legacy of the Republicans

People in the modern Republican Party have forgotten this.

But, then again, so have the Democrats.


If you want to get nostalgic for the Reconstruction Era (a time when blacks overwhelmingly favored the GOP), keep in mind that Reconstruction was the kind of heavy-handed Federal program that the "States'rights" loving base of your party abhors, and Rutherford B. Hayes abanoned it in order to gain the White House after a close election.
 
2012-08-23 06:20:21 PM  

Dwight_Yeast: Bob16: Nothing scares the parasitic 1% more than the idea of a poor peoples campaign like MLK was gonna pull off just before he got assassinated ( just a coincidence I'm sure ).

That's the interesting thing about King that most people forget and the reason he was in Memphis in the first place: he'd come to realize that the Civil Rights struggle was really a class struggle rather than a race struggle, and supporting the (mostly black) sanitation worker's union was the first step in moving toward fighting for the poor in America instead of just fighting for (mostly poor) blacks,

/Even his own associates didn't understand what MLK was up to.


And now Glenn Beck sings the praises of MLK and in the next breath spews off about those evul Union Thugs.
 
2012-08-24 09:37:34 AM  
Where is the damn Obvious tag?
 
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