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(Washington Post)   You know what's scary? Having a "superbug" that's killing patients in your hospital and you have to tear out equipment and building walls around the ICU to stop it   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 99
    More: Scary, National Institutes of Health, hospital-acquired infections, equipment, patients, hospitals  
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13549 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Aug 2012 at 11:10 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-22 11:15:25 PM  
Well that sucks balls.
 
2012-08-22 11:16:22 PM  
This Superbug will kill us all.

i.imgur.com
 
2012-08-22 11:16:25 PM  

the_chief: Well that sucks balls.


'Bout sums it up
 
2012-08-22 11:18:35 PM  
Honestly what do expect nature to do when the heard reaches 7,000,000,000.
 
2012-08-22 11:18:54 PM  
The reason for this shiat is the fact that they don't circulate much fresh air into those places. Its recirculated, filtered but not necessarily sterilized air. Maybe they oughta start thinking about why these allegedly super sterile facilities have the highest rates of collateral infection of practically anywhere including slaughterhouses. Friend of mine works in a kosher slaughterhouse that isn't really that clean of a place, and he hasn't been sick in 20 years as far as I know.
 
2012-08-22 11:20:40 PM  
Yeah. We had a kid in the PICU with it. Scary as shiat. Theoretically, they have brand new, top-line stuff to treat it with, but they refused to for that patient- if it becomes resistant to that, then what? So the kid died, of course, but what're you gonna do, I guess.
 
2012-08-22 11:21:29 PM  
This is the future.

Thanks, people who wanted antibiotics for everything and didn't use them right.
 
2012-08-22 11:21:42 PM  
As my grandfather used to say, "a hospital is no place for a sick person". The man died of a second heart attack at 84, so I'm inclined to agree.
 
2012-08-22 11:21:45 PM  

Deathfrogg: allegedly super sterile facilities


Regular hospital rooms make no such claims.
 
2012-08-22 11:22:19 PM  
They eventually used rectal swabs to test every patient in the 234-bed hospital.

My ex had a bug up her ass the last couple of years we were together.
 
2012-08-22 11:25:55 PM  
Have you ever noticed that the people who are obsessive about using anti-bacterial soap get sick way more often than those who don't? I have.
Not sure that'd make much of a difference with a superbug though.
 
2012-08-22 11:26:53 PM  

ragekage: Yeah. We had a kid in the PICU with it. Scary as shiat. Theoretically, they have brand new, top-line stuff to treat it with, but they refused to for that patient- if it becomes resistant to that, then what? So the kid died, of course, but what're you gonna do, I guess.


I know it happens all the time, but I still get so bummed any time I hear about kids dying. Not sure I could work in a hospital. Good work.
 
2012-08-22 11:27:34 PM  
I once got a 2 year staph infection from Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta. But after that cleared up I was pleased with their work.

Pennicillin allergy
 
2012-08-22 11:29:31 PM  
it'll
 
2012-08-22 11:30:31 PM  
Forced rectal swabs? Is this what Akin was referring to?
 
2012-08-22 11:30:31 PM  

Deathfrogg: The reason for this shiat is the fact that they don't circulate much fresh air into those places. Its recirculated, filtered but not necessarily sterilized air. Maybe they oughta start thinking about why these allegedly super sterile facilities have the highest rates of collateral infection of practically anywhere including slaughterhouses. Friend of mine works in a kosher slaughterhouse that isn't really that clean of a place, and he hasn't been sick in 20 years as far as I know.


The article is about antibiotic resistant bacteria. Your friend in the slaughterhouse would certainly encounter a lot of bacteria, but so do most people. As none of the cattle your friend is dealing with are likely to be sick with some sort of super-immune bacterial disease, he is unlikely to run into the bug in TFA. Hospitals, on the other hand, are where most people wind up when their usual course of antibiotics is not working. They are much, much more likely to have resistant bugs than a slaughterhouse. That said, I'm still concerned by the high use of antibiotics in agriculture.
 
2012-08-22 11:32:36 PM  
I've been wondering with the superbugs, if anyone has thought to revisit drugs like Salvarsan, which was developed to treat syphilis. Salvarsan is arsenic based but administered properly quite safe. Also unlike what's used to treat most bacterial infections today it's not an antibiotic drug. It was the development of drugs like penicillin that stopped the use of Salvarsan but perhaps it would be time to check into them again. Owing to their differing method of action, Salvarsan was not just the first treatment for syphilis but also the first chemotherapy drug (despite the public association with chemotherapy and cancer plenty of drugs used to treat things besides cancer can be call chemotherapy drugs), it may not be subject to resistance like anti-biotic drugs are.
 
2012-08-22 11:32:39 PM  

Franco: Honestly what do expect nature to do when the heard reaches 7,000,000,000.


I heard you can't spell "herd". Is that true?
 
2012-08-22 11:33:48 PM  

Aussie_As: ... some sort of super-immune bacterial disease...


Of course that should have been 'super-resistant bacterial disease'.
 
2012-08-22 11:34:08 PM  

Aussie_As: Deathfrogg: The reason for this shiat is the fact that they don't circulate much fresh air into those places. Its recirculated, filtered but not necessarily sterilized air. Maybe they oughta start thinking about why these allegedly super sterile facilities have the highest rates of collateral infection of practically anywhere including slaughterhouses. Friend of mine works in a kosher slaughterhouse that isn't really that clean of a place, and he hasn't been sick in 20 years as far as I know.

The article is about antibiotic resistant bacteria. Your friend in the slaughterhouse would certainly encounter a lot of bacteria, but so do most people. As none of the cattle your friend is dealing with are likely to be sick with some sort of super-immune bacterial disease, he is unlikely to run into the bug in TFA. Hospitals, on the other hand, are where most people wind up when their usual course of antibiotics is not working. They are much, much more likely to have resistant bugs than a slaughterhouse. That said, I'm still concerned by the high use of antibiotics in agriculture.


The hospital I work at, since it's a teaching hospital and university, infection control got the bright idea to swab all the ED staff's noses to take a check of MRSA colonization rates.

They'll never do that again, I promise you that.
 
2012-08-22 11:34:40 PM  
DEATH PANELS!!1
 
2012-08-22 11:36:16 PM  
The article seems a bit deficient in describing how/why the hospital thinks the bug could spread even with all their measures against it.

Still, I am thinking Dustin Hoffman, Milla Jovovich? Or Matt Damon?

Maybe screenplay by Stephen King, and a discovery of Tak in Act II.
 
2012-08-22 11:37:58 PM  
doesnt copper or some other element kill bacteria on contact? make hospital doorknobs, bed rails, table tops etc have a layer of copper.....

already being done?

"In addition, the EPA has approved a long list of antimicrobial copper products made from these alloys, such as bedrails, handrails, over-bed tables, sinks, faucets, door knobs, toilet hardware, computer keyboards, health club equipment, shopping cart handles, etc.... Copper doorknobs are used by hospitals to reduce the transfer of disease"
 
2012-08-22 11:38:12 PM  

WhyteRaven74: I've been wondering with the superbugs, if anyone has thought to revisit drugs like Salvarsan, which was developed to treat syphilis. Salvarsan is arsenic based but administered properly quite safe. Also unlike what's used to treat most bacterial infections today it's not an antibiotic drug. It was the development of drugs like penicillin that stopped the use of Salvarsan but perhaps it would be time to check into them again. Owing to their differing method of action, Salvarsan was not just the first treatment for syphilis but also the first chemotherapy drug (despite the public association with chemotherapy and cancer plenty of drugs used to treat things besides cancer can be call chemotherapy drugs), it may not be subject to resistance like anti-biotic drugs are.


There's been some good research about using viruses to target multi-resistant bacteria recently. Here's an example: Link
 
2012-08-22 11:38:51 PM  
Nosocomial infections will increase every year. Indiscriminate antibiotics in food supply and farm animals adds to the resistance. Most of these are gram negative infections. Take a culture from a hospital bed or a trauma stretcher. Beds in particular are poorly sanitized. Hand washing between patients is also a known cause. You'd be wise to insist on aseptic technique during dressing changes and wound care measures... now scrub my tater.
 
2012-08-22 11:40:49 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Franco: Honestly what do expect nature to do when the heard reaches 7,000,000,000.

I heard you can't spell "herd". Is that true?


memecrunch.com
 
2012-08-22 11:40:50 PM  

Deathfrogg: The reason for this shiat is the fact that they don't circulate much fresh air into those places. Its recirculated, filtered but not necessarily sterilized air. Maybe they oughta start thinking about why these allegedly super sterile facilities have the highest rates of collateral infection of practically anywhere including slaughterhouses. Friend of mine works in a kosher slaughterhouse that isn't really that clean of a place, and he hasn't been sick in 20 years as far as I know.


Yeah, it's "bad air." Brilliant.
 
2012-08-22 11:41:49 PM  

BMFPitt: This is the future.

Thanks, people who wanted antibiotics for everything and didn't use them right.


FTFY
 
2012-08-22 11:42:28 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Franco: Honestly what do expect nature to do when the heard reaches 7,000,000,000.

I heard you can't spell "herd". Is that true?


Nether of you can. It should be "hurd".
 
2012-08-22 11:43:56 PM  
Avaiting the fark moral relativists to chide us for being xenophobic about different cultures.
 
2012-08-22 11:44:20 PM  
You have an extra "ing" in your headline, subby.
 
2012-08-22 11:45:07 PM  
Might I suggest a portable cobalt-60 irradiation source.
 
2012-08-22 11:46:06 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Quantum Apostrophe: Franco: Honestly what do expect nature to do when the heard reaches 7,000,000,000.

I heard you can't spell "herd". Is that true?

Nether of you can. It should be "hurd".


No, the proper spelling is "hooered". Ex : She hooered 7,000,000,000 - and now she's REALLY sore.
 
2012-08-22 11:50:43 PM  

untaken_name: You have an extra "ing" in your headline, subby.


washtonpress.com ?
 
2012-08-22 11:51:44 PM  
What is scarier still is what will happen when the good folks at The Asylum get hold of this, and we have an endless series of Superbug vs. X on SyFy Channel.
 
2012-08-22 11:52:35 PM  
Why not open up the windows a bit? Let some fresh air in, along with outside bacteria, Protistas, Fungis, and so on so that they will compete for food (dead skin and all) against pathogens. It is my understanding of microbiology that pathogens attack the human body either by being opportunists, (Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, ) or because they are weak to the environment and need to infect a living being in order to reproduce. (Streptococcus Pyogenes)
 
2012-08-22 11:53:38 PM  

Aussie_As: WhyteRaven74: I've been wondering with the superbugs, if anyone has thought to revisit drugs like Salvarsan, which was developed to treat syphilis. Salvarsan is arsenic based but administered properly quite safe. Also unlike what's used to treat most bacterial infections today it's not an antibiotic drug. It was the development of drugs like penicillin that stopped the use of Salvarsan but perhaps it would be time to check into them again. Owing to their differing method of action, Salvarsan was not just the first treatment for syphilis but also the first chemotherapy drug (despite the public association with chemotherapy and cancer plenty of drugs used to treat things besides cancer can be call chemotherapy drugs), it may not be subject to resistance like anti-biotic drugs are.

There's been some good research about using viruses to target multi-resistant bacteria recently. Here's an example: Link


Aussie_As: WhyteRaven74: I've been wondering with the superbugs, if anyone has thought to revisit drugs like Salvarsan, which was developed to treat syphilis. Salvarsan is arsenic based but administered properly quite safe. Also unlike what's used to treat most bacterial infections today it's not an antibiotic drug. It was the development of drugs like penicillin that stopped the use of Salvarsan but perhaps it would be time to check into them again. Owing to their differing method of action, Salvarsan was not just the first treatment for syphilis but also the first chemotherapy drug (despite the public association with chemotherapy and cancer plenty of drugs used to treat things besides cancer can be call chemotherapy drugs), it may not be subject to resistance like anti-biotic drugs are.

There's been some good research about using viruses to target multi-resistant bacteria recently. Here's an example: Link


Old tech. The russkies were doing topical bacteriophage treatment to radiation burns for Chernobyl victims.
 
2012-08-22 11:58:58 PM  

Doom MD: Old tech. The russkies were doing topical bacteriophage treatment to radiation burns for Chernobyl victims.


Heh... old old old tech. Czarist bacteriologists were looking into bacteriophages without knowing about viruses, just that certain goo contained bacteriophagic properties.

The past is the future, right? Perhaps instead of hunting for viruses we'll make pseudo virii with nano-tech.
 
2012-08-23 12:01:24 AM  
images.wikia.com

Too obscure a reference?
 
2012-08-23 12:01:34 AM  

Point02GPA: untaken_name: You have an extra "ing" in your headline, subby.

washtonpress.com ?


"you have to tear out equipment and building walls"
 
2012-08-23 12:10:06 AM  
Its kind of interesting that you are three times as likely to be killed by an infection in a hospital as you are to die from a car wreck. Six times more likely to be killed by malpractice.
 
2012-08-23 12:11:13 AM  
this is seriously frightening. my dad is a RN at our local VA hospital, and he picked up a wicked lung infection from work. It sucks because where he has the 'beetus it is hard for him to fight off serious infections like this... he's been on oxygen therapy and ungodly amounts of expensive antibiotics for a month now... i'm just starting my career as a nurse, and this kinda crap scares the bejesus out of me.
 
2012-08-23 12:12:07 AM  

tzzhc4: [images.wikia.com image 526x473]

Too obscure a reference?


Maybe for the young-uns, but I'm pretty sure that's Doctor Who (Tom Baker?)
 
2012-08-23 12:13:31 AM  

Zarquon's Flat Tire: I once got a 2 year staph infection from Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta. But after that cleared up I was pleased with their work.

Pennicillin allergy


I, too have an allergy to penicillin, and have been fighting staph infections for a month now. The last one appears to just now be healed. Bactrim, then Z-Pac, and just finished a round of Doxycycline. I had 4 sites under my arm and in my side that had to be lanced and drained with wicks. Miserable. I'm supposing I got it from a lake while camping. It's all I can imagine. I overheard someone at dinner talking about his recent bout with it, too. The nurse told me she has seen many more of these than usual lately. That's very encouraging. I hope you have it beaten.
 
2012-08-23 12:19:40 AM  

Deathfrogg: The reason for this shiat is the fact that they don't circulate much fresh air into those places. Its recirculated, filtered but not necessarily sterilized air. Maybe they oughta start thinking about why these allegedly super sterile facilities have the highest rates of collateral infection of practically anywhere including slaughterhouses. Friend of mine works in a kosher slaughterhouse that isn't really that clean of a place, and he hasn't been sick in 20 years as far as I know.


Selling and setting up equipment that maintained safe barriers in hospitals and laboratories was my job for 11 years; I can't begin to tell you how many hospitals just want to monitor containment as opposed to actually create containment, same goes for many labs as well. It should be priority number one in these types of facilities, but you know what really is the first priority? Money.
I can't begin to count the number of times that I had an isolation unit or BSL lab in alarm that containment was not being maintained; which I found out through some nurse or worker calling me from the number on my monitor wondering why it was beeping. Quite often the calls came from maintenance after maintenance just shut the system down and called me when they got around to it. Roughly one half of these alarms were due to the fact that in order to maintain the proper polarity of air in the room, the fans must run at a relatively high speed all of the time, assuring the proper amount of air exchange in the room. This all requires heating and/or cooling of fresh air, only to be exhausted frequently as a constant process; not surprisingly, this is very expensive and when the penny pinchers see their bills skyrocketing they order maintenance to ramp the fans down to previous levels, resulting in loss of containment.
This always created a big circle at hospitals, the people in charge of safety knew that containment was necessary, and got the right equipment ordered to protect everyone; then when the costs became evident to the beancounters, they demanded electricity demands to be scaled back, sacrificing safety.
In many places, it was just a huge war of attrition, the money holders usually won.
 
2012-08-23 12:20:13 AM  

Doom MD: Aussie_As: WhyteRaven74:
....

Old tech. The russkies were doing topical bacteriophage treatment to radiation burns for Chernobyl victims.


Oh, it's much older than that. It was being pioneered from the 1920's, and the research ended abruptly when commercial antibiotics became available. But it's worth revisiting now that multi-resistant bacteria have evolved.
 
2012-08-23 12:20:36 AM  

a2jk: Zarquon's Flat Tire: I once got a 2 year staph infection from Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta. But after that cleared up I was pleased with their work.

Pennicillin allergy

I, too have an allergy to penicillin, and have been fighting staph infections for a month now. The last one appears to just now be healed. Bactrim, then Z-Pac, and just finished a round of Doxycycline. I had 4 sites under my arm and in my side that had to be lanced and drained with wicks. Miserable. I'm supposing I got it from a lake while camping. It's all I can imagine. I overheard someone at dinner talking about his recent bout with it, too. The nurse told me she has seen many more of these than usual lately. That's very encouraging. I hope you have it beaten.


It was 15 years ago, I think I'm good.
 
2012-08-23 12:22:16 AM  

Aussie_As: There's been some good research about using viruses to target multi-resistant bacteria recently


Yep I've been keeping up on that a bit and really it does make sense, just find something that can infect whatever infection you're going after.
 
2012-08-23 12:23:24 AM  

jeaux65: ragekage: Yeah. We had a kid in the PICU with it. Scary as shiat. Theoretically, they have brand new, top-line stuff to treat it with, but they refused to for that patient- if it becomes resistant to that, then what? So the kid died, of course, but what're you gonna do, I guess.

I know it happens all the time, but I still get so bummed any time I hear about kids dying. Not sure I could work in a hospital. Good work.


Good move. My mother in law worked as an emergency room RN at a children's hospital for almost 30 years. I'm sure she had to be able to emotionally detach from the situation to do her job, but it became such a part of her personality that she lost the ability to empathize with a lot of everyday life. She is so emotionally closed off, she's like one of those cops who should have quit the job before they lost all faith in humanity.
 
2012-08-23 12:28:27 AM  

sneako: this is seriously frightening. my dad is a RN at our local VA hospital, and he picked up a wicked lung infection from work. It sucks because where he has the 'beetus it is hard for him to fight off serious infections like this... he's been on oxygen therapy and ungodly amounts of expensive antibiotics for a month now... i'm just starting my career as a nurse, and this kinda crap scares the bejesus out of me.


Keep with you noble deed. Subby's intent was to make the public aware of it and not to scare off people like you.
 
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