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(Rock Paper Shotgun)   Ubisoft's PC games suffer a 95% piracy rate says Ubisoft's CEO. The remaining 5% probably got sucked up his ass to fill the void where those statistics came from   (rockpapershotgun.com) divider line 210
    More: Unlikely, CEO, PC games, Ubisoft, video game industry, interest rates, smoking guns  
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2489 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 Aug 2012 at 4:19 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Skr
2012-08-22 04:22:25 PM  
After the butchering they did to Heroes of Might and Magic 6, can't say I particularly feel sorry for them (even though those figures are completely B.S.)
 
2012-08-22 04:25:16 PM  
I'd really like to see the source of their numbers. 95% piracy rate seems really high.
 
2012-08-22 04:25:21 PM  

Skr: After the butchering they did to Heroes of Might and Magic 6, can't say I particularly feel sorry for them (even though those figures are completely B.S.)


Considering how utterly godawful their DRM is, I wouldn't be surprised to learn that the majority of legitimate owners are using cracks to get around it.
 
2012-08-22 04:26:45 PM  
That 95% is probably legitimate users that ran the game on a flaky internet connection, and thus looked illegitimate to their servers.

Hell, when they stripped the DRM out of the OSX version of AC:B, they rendered the game unplayable. Seriously, their approach to removing the DRM was to simply make it so the game crashed on startup. You have to jump through a bunch of hoops to get it running.

And honestly? I was really disappointed by the game. After sitting through 6 hours of cut scene, the actual gameplay wasn't bad, but by that point I was so frustrated by the whole thing. I wouldn't have bought it if not for the Steam Summer Sale. It did completely ruin the vague interest I had in AC3, so GOOD JOB.
 
2012-08-22 04:28:54 PM  
As a lifelong, true PC gamer.. I know exactly how Ubi and other devs have ruined purchased games for me.. while pirated versions of the same game work better. Always online? F off. Limited installs, F off. Program checks. F off.
Let's not talk about games released that still require oodles of patches. Or the titles that don't have demos/betas. Devs that hose users with instant DLC..and that DLC being ready PRIOR to the game being launched.. and the game still has bugs ..but hey "buy this DRM"..
Meanwhile.. these added in DRM bits are maps.. or skins.. mods.. things that the user community used to provide -FOR FREE to the community.. ya know, back when top tier games cost $39 or so bucks.. and not $69.

Go screw yourself Ubi and anyone that looks like em. Just let themselves wipe each other off the map? Yep.. fark em and any other dev just like em.
 
2012-08-22 04:30:05 PM  
Not only that, but they claim their DRM is working.
 
2012-08-22 04:33:03 PM  
A friend and I used to play Anno 2070 all the time until he tried installing it on his laptop, apparently Ubisoft decided that he wasn't allowed to do that and voided his serial number.
 
2012-08-22 04:33:22 PM  
Screw Ubisoft, and I'm gonna say screw EA if they make SimCity 5 online only. Sometimes, I do not have internet when on the road, and Simcity is/was a great time killer.
 
2012-08-22 04:35:18 PM  
Assuming he is correct and that his company isn't going out of business, hence that it is covering costs, it means Ubisoft games are 95% overpriced. Assuming that people are basically honest (and would buy the game rather than steal it if the price were acceptable to them), if he cut the price by 50%, sales should skyrocket and piracy plummet.
 
2012-08-22 04:36:33 PM  
Gee, Ubisoft, how is that "always on" DRM working out for you?

Nothing like painting a big, fat target on your ass and announce you plan to shove your dick up all of your legitimate users' asses.

Likewise, not surprising when people abandon your games en masse and download cracked versions that are more enjoyable and flexible to play.
 
2012-08-22 04:37:42 PM  

heypete: I'd really like to see the source of their numbers.



img801.imageshack.us

This source is this man's anal cavity.
 
2012-08-22 04:42:31 PM  

Snapper Carr: This source is this man's anal cavity.


Coincidentally, their logo was modelled off of the view from a colonoscopy camera.
 
2012-08-22 04:43:36 PM  
Well the marketing guys stated that when we published the new AC game we would sell 20m copies on day one. We have only sold 1m copies so ergo we have a 95% piracy rate.
 
2012-08-22 04:44:08 PM  
5% of the time. Our DRM works every time.
 
2012-08-22 04:45:21 PM  

t3knomanser: Snapper Carr: This source is this man's anal cavity.

Coincidentally, their logo was modelled off of the view from a colonoscopy camera.


And the name is what the patient muttered just before the tip went in.
 
2012-08-22 04:45:37 PM  
So, if we all agree to not steal games, you would be willing to charge just $3.99 for a game then, right? Didn't think so.
 
2012-08-22 04:47:14 PM  
I work in game development. The last title we worked on we did a PC version. We have telemetry that tracks, among other things, how many unique users play the game. The PC version reported over 5 times as many unique users (in the first 2 weeks) as were copies sold.

You may say something "smart" like, well all of those unique users are not necessarily buyers so you didn't lose out on anything. Maybe that is true and maybe it isn't. But the numbers do not lie. We spent millions of dollars developing a AAA quality title and almost over a million people played it for free on PC.

People don't pirate games because they think the cost/reward ratio is off. They pirate games because they don't want to pay for them at all if they CAN play them for free. I know tons of people who operate like this. Get anything for free that you can and buy the games you have to. Let's not pretend this is the "market at work". It is thievery.
 
2012-08-22 04:48:16 PM  
Surprise! Publishers and developers have been using piracy to justify their desperate struggle to stay profitable. How do you do that these days? 4 words: "Games as a service". F2P and micro transactions are just the latest methods being used to push less content at higher prices.
 
2012-08-22 04:50:50 PM  
Maybe he meant 95% of EA title are being pirated? That seems reasonable
 
2012-08-22 04:52:10 PM  

Barry McCackiner: I work in game development. The last title we worked on we did a PC version. We have telemetry that tracks, among other things, how many unique users play the game. The PC version reported over 5 times as many unique users (in the first 2 weeks) as were copies sold.

You may say something "smart" like, well all of those unique users are not necessarily buyers so you didn't lose out on anything. Maybe that is true and maybe it isn't. But the numbers do not lie. We spent millions of dollars developing a AAA quality title and almost over a million people played it for free on PC.

People don't pirate games because they think the cost/reward ratio is off. They pirate games because they don't want to pay for them at all if they CAN play them for free. I know tons of people who operate like this. Get anything for free that you can and buy the games you have to. Let's not pretend this is the "market at work". It is thievery.


I'm sure you will provide statistics to prove this anecdote.
 
2012-08-22 04:53:25 PM  

fluffy2097: I'm sure you will provide statistics to prove this anecdote.


B..b...but telemetry n' shiat!
 
2012-08-22 04:55:17 PM  

Edward Rooney Dean of Students: B..b...but telemetry n' shiat!


I'm hoping it's something a bit more sophisticated than tracking IP addresses...
 
2012-08-22 04:58:47 PM  

incendi: I'm hoping it's something a bit more sophisticated than tracking IP addresses...


it's probably a checksum of your hardware. Something that would be effected by driver updates and other stupid shiat. I've had Steam complain over me overclocking my computer and rebooting to save the changes. It always thinks I'm on a new computer for some reason whenever my default FSB frequency or multiplier changes.
 
2012-08-22 04:59:23 PM  

Barry McCackiner: I work in game development. The last title we worked on we did a PC version. We have telemetry that tracks, among other things, how many unique users play the game. The PC version reported over 5 times as many unique users (in the first 2 weeks) as were copies sold.

You may say something "smart" like, well all of those unique users are not necessarily buyers so you didn't lose out on anything. Maybe that is true and maybe it isn't. But the numbers do not lie. We spent millions of dollars developing a AAA quality title and almost over a million people played it for free on PC.

People don't pirate games because they think the cost/reward ratio is off. They pirate games because they don't want to pay for them at all if they CAN play them for free. I know tons of people who operate like this. Get anything for free that you can and buy the games you have to. Let's not pretend this is the "market at work". It is thievery.


If you're not full of shiat - which I doubt - How are you tracking a "unique user"? IP address? hardware hashes? retinal scans taken from webcams? How was your PC version distributed? And how exactly did you enforce the unique identity being sent to your server? This sounds like a made-up stat from somebody who has a pre-existing opinion and wants to invent validity to back it.

If you are a legitimate developer, I apologize, but if you state an unbelievable statistic, be ready for questions about your validity.
 
2012-08-22 04:59:30 PM  
To be fair, Assassin's Creed plays like it was 95% pirated from other games.
 
2012-08-22 05:00:09 PM  
Never had a problem with Ubi DRM - Anno 2070, Settlers 7, Heroes. If this is the only way I can avoid free to play rubbish, I'm all for it. I'm looking forward to the Anno 2070 expansion.

I'm not *thrilled* about the 3 activation limit on the games - but always on doesn't bother me. If you want to play without DRM, wait a couple of years as Ubi releases games to GOG.

The future is either always on DRM or F2P. Publishers aren't going that way because they think "heck yes, this is exactly what we want to put in our games" - instead it's because piracy has reached the point where it's too risky not to go one f these routes. The MechWarrior Tactics guys (who look like they have a great game) and the new BattleTech devs specifically said that they went F2P because the traditional model wouldn't support those games (which look great).

Want a stark demo of the impact of piracy? Look at the quality of games on Android (biggest by market share) and iOS. Hell there are better games on Windows Phone than on Android - because one of these platforms is used by people who don't buy software.

So complain about Ubi's DRM all you want - people who actually spend many hundreds of dollars a year actually purchasing games on the PC platform rarely have a problem with it.
 
2012-08-22 05:04:25 PM  

Barry McCackiner: People don't pirate games because they think the cost/reward ratio is off. They pirate games because they don't want to pay for them at all if they CAN play them for free. I know tons of people who operate like this. Get anything for free that you can and buy the games you have to. Let's not pretend this is the "market at work". It is thievery.


Steam has completely, 100%, obliterated your opinion from being fact on the PC platform. You know "tons" of people. If you know more people that pirate $5-$20 games than purchase them, you need to stop hanging out with douchebags.

I'd be fascinated to see your telemetry weighted by hours played, not just connections. Did your game have a free, fully functional, and readily available demo? Did you make any effort to advertise this demo as existing? I've pirated a bunch of games. The majority of those pirated games have been played for under 6 hours. The ones that weren't, were purchased later.

I'm not asking you to name your title, but AAA has been synonymous with "We think we deserve $60 from every PC gamer by virtue of how fabulous we are" for a while. $60 is a lot of money for what is becoming more and more "We blew the budget on cinematics and voice talent wrapped around a B+ game." This is just as true for consoles - what would have been a pretty good $30, $40 game needs a massive budget to cover graphics that drives the price to $60 and it's not a $60 game.
 
2012-08-22 05:04:51 PM  

Barry McCackiner: I work in game development. The last title we worked on we did a PC version. We have telemetry that tracks, among other things, how many unique users play the game. The PC version reported over 5 times as many unique users (in the first 2 weeks) as were copies sold.

You may say something "smart" like, well all of those unique users are not necessarily buyers so you didn't lose out on anything. Maybe that is true and maybe it isn't. But the numbers do not lie. We spent millions of dollars developing a AAA quality title and almost over a million people played it for free on PC.

People don't pirate games because they think the cost/reward ratio is off. They pirate games because they don't want to pay for them at all if they CAN play them for free. I know tons of people who operate like this. Get anything for free that you can and buy the games you have to. Let's not pretend this is the "market at work". It is thievery.


Since you used the phrase "AAA quality" with a straight face I am compelled to assume that you were working on the tie in game for the Battleship movie.
 
2012-08-22 05:05:30 PM  

narkor: I represent a dead industry full of failed policy, much like the RIAA and MPAA.


TL;DR version.

/Why is it that indy developers always seem to make so much more money and have so many fewer problems with piracy.
//It couldn't possibly have been something the developers have done to offend customers.
 
2012-08-22 05:07:19 PM  

Barry McCackiner: ***snip***


Do you honestly think that making it more difficult for legitimate users to play your game is going to reduce the number of people who pirate it? I am all for people getting paid for their work, but how would a company ever truly stop people who pirate because they prefer it? And if that solution were implemented, would it be overly burdensome on legitimate players? Or has Diablo 3 shown that enough people will buy a AAA title, no matter the requirements placed on legitimate players, that game companies feel they have free reign to use any means they deem necessary to stop pirating?

//Serious questions, no snark. I used Diablo 3 as it is the most restrictive DRM on a game that I am aware of. If there is a better example, please let me know.
 
2012-08-22 05:10:58 PM  

Barry McCackiner: People don't pirate games because they think the cost/reward ratio is off. They pirate games because they don't want to pay for them at all if they CAN play them for free. I know tons of people who operate like this.


The plural of "anecdote" isn't "data".

Game developers do a lot of stupid stuff for no good reason. Take, for example, Mass Effect 3 (I'm using it as an example because I'm familiar with the game): it released on March 6th in North America. Australian users were able to buy it on March 8th, Europeans on March 9th, and the Japanese on March 15th.

Why? What possible reason is there to have different release dates for different regions? I wouldn't be surprised if users eagerly awaiting the release of the game in Europe and Asia decided that it'd just be faster and easier to just download the game and play it. Do I agree with that? No, but having it available globally at the same time would likely reduce that effect.

Oh, and they decide not to release ME3 on Steam (which has something like 70% of the digital distribution market). That's a major turn-off for a lot of people. Lots of gamers I know aren't keen on EA's Origin and prefer to keep all their games in one service. Steam makes impulse-buying games easy, downloads are fast, it keeps everything organized, and provides reasonably-effective non-intrusive DRM (as opposed to SecuROM or other abominations).

Valve recently expanded into Russia and they've been making money hand over fist there. According to their CEO, Gabe Newell,
It seems other games companies who had tried to penetrate Russia hadn't done so due to a the infamous levels of piracy. "The people who are telling you that Russians pirate everything are the people who wait six months to localize their product into Russia," said Newell. "It doesn't take much in terms of providing a better service to make pirates a non-issue."

...

"The easiest way to stop piracy is not by putting antipiracy technology to work," Newell said. "It's by giving those people a service that's better than what they're receiving from the pirates."


Sure, there's some people who will always pirate stuff. You can't do much about them, but widespread piracy is a symptom of some sort of market failure.
 
2012-08-22 05:11:55 PM  

fluffy2097: incendi: I'm hoping it's something a bit more sophisticated than tracking IP addresses...

it's probably a checksum of your hardware. Something that would be effected by driver updates and other stupid shiat. I've had Steam complain over me overclocking my computer and rebooting to save the changes. It always thinks I'm on a new computer for some reason whenever my default FSB frequency or multiplier changes.


It is something like that. I'm not in a position to actually lay out how we do what we do technically. You can be assured that in such a short time period there was probably very little noise in the way of game resales and computer config changes. You could remove 10% of the unique users we came up with and still have staggering figures of piracy.

Responding to some other comments. When I refer to AAA, I refer to an HD game that costs over tens of millions of dollars to develop. I'm not debating the finer points of why games cost as much as they do to develop, but obviously a lot of the assumptions people make are just false.

I can't provide proof of what I claim. I don't care if you people believe me. My life is game development and I have seen this pattern over and over.
 
2012-08-22 05:12:50 PM  

Barry McCackiner: I work in game development. The last title we worked on we did a PC version. We have telemetry that tracks, among other things, how many unique users play the game. The PC version reported over 5 times as many unique users (in the first 2 weeks) as were copies sold.

You may say something "smart" like, well all of those unique users are not necessarily buyers so you didn't lose out on anything. Maybe that is true and maybe it isn't. But the numbers do not lie. We spent millions of dollars developing a AAA quality title and almost over a million people played it for free on PC.

People don't pirate games because they think the cost/reward ratio is off. They pirate games because they don't want to pay for them at all if they CAN play them for free. I know tons of people who operate like this. Get anything for free that you can and buy the games you have to. Let's not pretend this is the "market at work". It is thievery.

But would pirates really buy games?

Anecdotally and from studies by companies like the BSA, it's clear that pirates for the most part have very little income. They are unemployed students, or live in countries with very low per-capita GDP, where the price of a $60 game is more like $1000 (in terms of purchasing power parity and income percentage). When Reflexive games performed a series of experiments with anti-piracy measures, they found that they only made one extra sale for every 1000 pirated copies they blocked [7]. This implies that their 90% piracy statistic caused them to lose less than 1% of their sales.

[7] = http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=17350

With the Humble Indie Bundle promotion we've seen that when we treat gamers as real people instead of criminals, they seem to respond in kind. Anyone can get all five DRM-free games for a single penny, and pirate them as much as they want -- we have no way to find out or stop it. However, in just the first two days, we have over 40,000 contributions with an average of $8 each! Would we have seen this much support if the games were console ports that only worked when connected to a secure online DRM server? We'll never know for sure, but somehow I doubt it.


The Humble Bundles, Steam, Minecraft, and Kickstarter all show that it's about service rather than cost.
 
2012-08-22 05:13:03 PM  

Ned Stark: Since you used the phrase "AAA quality" with a straight face I am compelled to assume that you were working on the tie in game for the Battleship movie.


www.gamesmuseum.uwaterloo.ca 
?
 
2012-08-22 05:14:06 PM  

heypete: Sure, there's some people who will always pirate stuff. You can't do much about them, but widespread piracy is a symptom of some sort of market failure.


Get out of here with your common sense and logic. We want none of it.

/It's been a long time since I played an EA or Ubisoft game.
//Mostly because I don't even want to give the fools the excuse of calling me a pirate.
 
2012-08-22 05:17:14 PM  

roc6783: Barry McCackiner: ***snip***

Do you honestly think that making it more difficult for legitimate users to play your game is going to reduce the number of people who pirate it? I am all for people getting paid for their work, but how would a company ever truly stop people who pirate because they prefer it? And if that solution were implemented, would it be overly burdensome on legitimate players? Or has Diablo 3 shown that enough people will buy a AAA title, no matter the requirements placed on legitimate players, that game companies feel they have free reign to use any means they deem necessary to stop pirating?

//Serious questions, no snark. I used Diablo 3 as it is the most restrictive DRM on a game that I am aware of. If there is a better example, please let me know.


The vocal minority that hates DRM and boycotts games that have it are not enough to justify not having it. People nerd rage in forums and complain about DRM, but the fact of the matter is, a game with no DRM at all is doomed. There is plenty of internal statistics that show that you only need slightly more "stickiness" to the title to get the sales numbers you expect. If you just throw a single player action game out there with no DRM you are asking for pain.

This is some of the same reasoning with DLC being released. Obviously part of the reason for DLC is getting more money from the consumers. But its other primary purpose is to make people hold on to their discs for a few weeks longer (instead of reselling it at the local Game Stop). If you can do that you can ride out the wave of initial buyers and lower the inventory of used games. A small thing like a promised PDLC episode is enough to move literally thousands of units in your direction. It pisses off some hardcore people, but the average gaming consumer doesn't care about that crap.
 
2012-08-22 05:18:38 PM  

Barry McCackiner: You can be assured that in such a short time period there was probably very little noise in the way of game resales and computer config changes.


I can be assured in no such manner that this is true at all.

"Time to install a game!"
*unique activation*
"shiat, the game wont run, maybe I'll update my video card drivers."
*unique activation*
"hmm. Gotta reboot my modem because my ISP sucks"
*unique activation*
"Crap. It's patch tuesday, windows update."
*unique activation*
"I bought a webcam!"
*Unique activation.*
 
2012-08-22 05:19:59 PM  

Barry McCackiner: I work in game development. The last title we worked on we did a PC version. We have telemetry that tracks, among other things, how many unique users play the game. The PC version reported over 5 times as many unique users (in the first 2 weeks) as were copies sold.

You may say something "smart" like, well all of those unique users are not necessarily buyers so you didn't lose out on anything. Maybe that is true and maybe it isn't. But the numbers do not lie. We spent millions of dollars developing a AAA quality title and almost over a million people played it for free on PC.

People don't pirate games because they think the cost/reward ratio is off. They pirate games because they don't want to pay for them at all if they CAN play them for free. I know tons of people who operate like this. Get anything for free that you can and buy the games you have to. Let's not pretend this is the "market at work". It is thievery.


What did the numbers say after a 6 month period? First two week statistics will contain people "trying" the game before buying.
 
2012-08-22 05:20:44 PM  
Dates are hugely important. Maybe the most important thing. If someone who would have bought your game steals it because you wouldnt sell it to them then, well, arent you a prat?.

A good demo is also important (tons of people pirate to 'try', then never get around to buying). Bad DRM is a big cause of piracy (and UbiSoft is the worst of all).

That said a lot of people ARE thieving shiatbags.
 
2012-08-22 05:22:43 PM  

Barry McCackiner: The vocal minority that hates DRM and boycotts games that have it are not enough to justify not having it. People nerd rage in forums and complain about DRM, but the fact of the matter is, a game with no DRM at all is doomed. There is plenty of internal statistics that show that you only need slightly more "stickiness" to the title to get the sales numbers you expect. If you just throw a single player action game out there with no DRM you are asking for pain.

This is some of the same reasoning with DLC being released. Obviously part of the reason for DLC is getting more money from the consumers. But its other primary purpose is to make people hold on to their discs for a few weeks longer (instead of reselling it at the local Game Stop). If you can do that you can ride out the wave of initial buyers and lower the inventory of used games. A small thing like a promised PDLC episode is enough to move literally thousands of units in your direction. It pisses off some hardcore people, but the average gaming consumer doesn't care about that crap.



You say that pissing off your customers isn't a problem, but you're dealing with a massive piracy problem? How does that work?
 
2012-08-22 05:24:43 PM  

Barry McCackiner: But its other primary purpose is to make people hold on to their discs for a few weeks longer (instead of reselling it at the local Game Stop). If you can do that you can ride out the wave of initial buyers and lower the inventory of used games. A small thing like a promised PDLC episode is enough to move literally thousands of units in your direction. It pisses off some hardcore people, but the average gaming consumer doesn't care about that crap.


I'd love to know what company you work for so I never buy one of their games again.

/Alas
 
2012-08-22 05:27:39 PM  

fluffy2097: heypete: Sure, there's some people who will always pirate stuff. You can't do much about them, but widespread piracy is a symptom of some sort of market failure.

Get out of here with your common sense and logic. We want none of it.

/It's been a long time since I played an EA or Ubisoft game.
//Mostly because I don't even want to give the fools the excuse of calling me a pirate.


www.awardweb.info
 
2012-08-22 05:28:07 PM  

Barry McCackiner: fluffy2097: incendi: I'm hoping it's something a bit more sophisticated than tracking IP addresses...

it's probably a checksum of your hardware. Something that would be effected by driver updates and other stupid shiat. I've had Steam complain over me overclocking my computer and rebooting to save the changes. It always thinks I'm on a new computer for some reason whenever my default FSB frequency or multiplier changes.

It is something like that. I'm not in a position to actually lay out how we do what we do technically. You can be assured that in such a short time period there was probably very little noise in the way of game resales and computer config changes. You could remove 10% of the unique users we came up with and still have staggering figures of piracy.

Responding to some other comments. When I refer to AAA, I refer to an HD game that costs over tens of millions of dollars to develop. I'm not debating the finer points of why games cost as much as they do to develop, but obviously a lot of the assumptions people make are just false.

I can't provide proof of what I claim. I don't care if you people believe me. My life is game development and I have seen this pattern over and over.


Piracy represents an opportunity for a large amount of new sales. Such a dramatic amount of supposed piracy shows that your company/developer/publisher is failing to create a good value for the majority of consumers, and is doing something significantly wrong that they fail to capitalize on such. large, interested potential consumer base.
 
2012-08-22 05:29:05 PM  
Speaking of pirates, this

upload.wikimedia.org

is still a fantastically fun game. Think I'll start again tonight.
 
kab
2012-08-22 05:29:52 PM  
FTA:

"There is no hard evidence to show that piracy affects sales."

I guess common farking sense isn't 'hard evidence'
 
2012-08-22 05:30:34 PM  

DerAppie: What did the numbers say after a 6 month period? First two week statistics will contain people "trying" the game before buying.


After 6 months it is worse. Telemetry as a whole isn't as useful after that long of a time though unless you are talking about a very active multiplayer game. Most single player experiences are dead in the market after a month. You have to capture that first month or else you missed it. You can get some money over the long haul, but not with the type of games we make.

Edward Rooney Dean of Students: I'd love to know what company you work for so I never buy one of their games again.

/Alas


Uh, they all do it bro. Some indie developers might not but it is because they are begging for your business.
 
2012-08-22 05:30:36 PM  

tomcatadam: Piracy represents an opportunity for a large amount of new sales. Such a dramatic amount of supposed piracy shows that your company/developer/publisher is failing to create a good value for the majority of consumers, and is doing something significantly wrong that they fail to capitalize on such. large, interested potential consumer base.


Or that your product primarily appeals to broke teenagers who couldn't buy the game even if they wanted to.

/Pirated a lot of games as a broke teen
//Stopped once I got a real job and Steam
 
2012-08-22 05:31:18 PM  

gaspode: That said a lot of people ARE thieving shiatbags.


The vast majority of piracy is committed by a minority of pirates, and pirates, on average, buy/pay for more media than the average consumer.
 
2012-08-22 05:31:20 PM  

kab: FTA:

"There is no hard evidence to show that piracy affects sales."

I guess common farking sense isn't 'hard evidence'


Really? You think 100% of those pirates would have purchased the game had they not been able to pirate it?

That's the 'hard evidence' they mean, genius.
 
2012-08-22 05:31:33 PM  

Barry McCackiner: I work in game development. The last title we worked on we did a PC version. We have telemetry that tracks, among other things, how many unique users play the game. The PC version reported over 5 times as many unique users (in the first 2 weeks) as were copies sold.

You may say something "smart" like, well all of those unique users are not necessarily buyers so you didn't lose out on anything. Maybe that is true and maybe it isn't. But the numbers do not lie. We spent millions of dollars developing a AAA quality title and almost over a million people played it for free on PC.

People don't pirate games because they think the cost/reward ratio is off. They pirate games because they don't want to pay for them at all if they CAN play them for free. I know tons of people who operate like this. Get anything for free that you can and buy the games you have to. Let's not pretend this is the "market at work". It is thievery.


Yes the concept of here's a product, buy it mentality is out dated and doesn't work well. Doesn't change the fact that DRM is complete crap and worthless to boot.
 
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