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(NJ.com)   Campbell's CEO goes on pilgrimages to food trucks of Portland, Austin, and SF to learn how to make its uncool line of soups more ethnic and hip. Basically, put a chickpea on it, roast all the veggies, and add cilantro   (nj.com) divider line 109
    More: Ironic, San Francisco, food trucks, soups, Bernstein Research, pouches, bell peppers, Long Branch, hips  
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3477 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Aug 2012 at 4:02 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-22 04:48:55 PM
Where can I get Campbell's Green Pea soup in Montreal? Help me, fark!
 
2012-08-22 04:50:06 PM

vudukungfu: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Is soup more of a colder-climate thing? Living in FL, I never get hungry and think I'd like a hot bowl of chunky liquid.

One word.
Gaspacho.
wait, I'll give you another one
vichyssoise.


if it's real hot, take a bunch of tomatillos, some lime, a jalapeno, cilantro, and maybe some white grape juice... something sweet... or fark it, some champagne, why not... actually, champagne might not work, i just got bored... and there was something else that I forgot... something important...

well, find out that secret ingredient that I forgot about and blend it up. and you have my wife's fancy as hell, but obscenely easy to make, tomatillo gazpacho.

/ serve cold, do not heat, cook, or do anything like that.  and, it doesn't really matter about the ingredients, she changes it every time she makes it based on whatever she felt like buying that day. but, every single time she makes, tomatillos and a jalapeno are involved.  then just get some other acid, something sweet, and something flavorful (like the cilantro).
 
2012-08-22 04:52:29 PM
TEAM NO CILANTRO
 
2012-08-22 04:54:04 PM
I just ate lunch from a food cart so this is relevant to my interests.

/Portland food carts rock and there's a pod across the street from my apartment
 
2012-08-22 04:55:29 PM
images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-08-22 04:56:51 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Is soup more of a colder-climate thing? Living in FL, I never get hungry and think I'd like a hot bowl of chunky liquid.


No it's not. I live in Hawaii and eat a lot of soup. One of the popular local dishes here is saimin.

From wikipedia:

Saimin is a noodle soup dish unique to Hawaii. Inspired by Japanese udon, Chinese mein, and Filipino pancit, saimin was developed during Hawaii's plantation era. It is a soup dish of soft wheat egg noodles served in hot dashi garnished with green onions. Kamaboko, char siu, sliced Spam, linguiça, and nori may be added, among other additions.

Japanese pot stickers, called gyoza, as well as Chinese wonton, may be substituted for or added to the dish's noodles for special occasions. A pan-fried version, primarily inspired by Filipino pancit,[citation needed] is also popular, especially at carnivals, fairgrounds, and catered parties
 
2012-08-22 04:59:04 PM

muldoon: Austin, Portland, SF?

Who gives a shiat what they think?


Teenagers from from red states who dream of one day serving overpriced coffee drinks to people blogging on iPads.
 
2012-08-22 05:00:06 PM

kevinfra: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Is soup more of a colder-climate thing? Living in FL, I never get hungry and think I'd like a hot bowl of chunky liquid.

No it's not. I live in Hawaii and eat a lot of soup. One of the popular local dishes here is saimin.

From wikipedia:

Saimin is a noodle soup dish unique to Hawaii. Inspired by Japanese udon, Chinese mein, and Filipino pancit, saimin was developed during Hawaii's plantation era. It is a soup dish of soft wheat egg noodles served in hot dashi garnished with green onions. Kamaboko, char siu, sliced Spam, linguiça, and nori may be added, among other additions.

Japanese pot stickers, called gyoza, as well as Chinese wonton, may be substituted for or added to the dish's noodles for special occasions. A pan-fried version, primarily inspired by Filipino pancit,[citation needed] is also popular, especially at carnivals, fairgrounds, and catered parties


I want that...I can come live with you?
 
2012-08-22 05:06:32 PM
Tell you what. When me and my wife and son were struggling after graduation a can
of chunky soup over rice was a nice break from hotdogs and beans.
 
2012-08-22 05:10:07 PM

KrispyKritter: Some years ago Campbell's announced they would no longer used Jersey grown tomatos in their soups. I have not bought their products since then. You fark with the Garden State, you lose.


Wait, I thought "New Jersey tomato" was a euphemism, like Bronx cheer or horse apple.
 
2012-08-22 05:12:49 PM

kevinfra: No it's not. I live in Hawaii and eat a lot of soup. One of the popular local dishes here is saimin.

From wikipedia:

Saimin is a noodle soup dish unique to Hawaii. Inspired by Japanese udon, Chinese mein, and Filipino pancit, saimin was developed during Hawaii's plantation era. It is a soup dish of soft wheat egg noodles served in hot dashi garnished with green onions. Kamaboko, char siu, sliced Spam, linguiça, and nori may be added, among other additions.

Japanese pot stickers, called gyoza, as well as Chinese wonton, may be substituted for or added to the dish's noodles for special occasions. A pan-fried version, primarily inspired by Filipino pancit,[citation needed] is also popular, especially at carnivals, fairgrounds, and catered parties


Oooooooooh. That sounds yummy. I think there's a Hawaiian place around here, will hafta see if their menu carries that. And your post reminds me that I haven't had pancit in ages and now I'm totally craving it. Gotta find a good recipe, as well as good rice noodles. I also need to politely ask my friend's co-worker for her lumpia recipe as well. OM NOM NOM.
 
2012-08-22 05:13:37 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: muldoon: Austin, Portland, SF?

Who gives a shiat what they think?

Teenagers from from red states who dream of one day serving overpriced coffee drinks to people blogging on iPads.


actually, it's because austin, portland and san francisco all have vibrant truck based food service.

the truck based restaurant is the current source of inspiration in the culinary world. the low overhead costs lead to real innovation, because no one has to be concerned about serving the same tired old cuisine. there is the possibility of lot more unique approaches to cuisine in these openly experimental world of truck kitchens.

campbells is looking for a combination of innovation and cost-efficiency. they will find those two things in a truck kitchen. so, go to the places with the most competitive truck kitchens. austin, portland, and san francisco.
 
2012-08-22 05:16:19 PM

Snarfangel: KrispyKritter: Some years ago Campbell's announced they would no longer used Jersey grown tomatos in their soups. I have not bought their products since then. You fark with the Garden State, you lose.

Wait, I thought "New Jersey tomato" was a euphemism, like Bronx cheer or horse apple.


A New Jersey tomato:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-08-22 05:16:52 PM
Dear Campbell's CEO:

I will instantly see your brand as 100% cooler if you bring back the Fully Loaded Rigatoni and Meatballs and Turkey Pot Pie selections.

Otherwise, you go to hell. You go to hell and you die.

Cordially,
Mr. Bonestripper
 
2012-08-22 05:20:44 PM
I'm not a hipster or a foodie, so canned soup does make it into my baked dinners sometimes... I won't mind seeing their new products and trying them out.

That said, I hope they keep around the old standbys. I got a terrible cold recently and damn if I didn't have a craving for campbell's chicken soup. That stuff was better for my throat than any cold medicine I could buy.
 
2012-08-22 05:21:41 PM
Soup Thread! I never liked soup until I went here:

4.bp.blogspot.com

My favs are tomato cheddar, corn chowder with bacon, so many good potato soups... 

I feel like Campbell soups are too basic. H&H has some creative ones.
 
2012-08-22 05:37:35 PM

Dahnkster: Dear Campbell's Soup.

Lemme help a brother out.

1. Use ACTUAL chicken or beef stock instead of heavily salted water that got near a chicken beak or cow intestine.
2. REAL cream in your 'Cream of' Soups.
3. When your first ingredient says 'water', you're doing it wrong.
4. I know I already touched on the excess salt, but you really don't seem to have a farking clue.
5. Chunks of meat, not tiny sterile pale bits of processed rubber.
6. Look into cumin, cayenne, bay leaves, leeks, cilantro, thyme, curry blends, Worcestershire, Tabasco, cracked black pepper.


Do you have ANY clue how modern industrialized food production works? Sure, Campbell could do all those things, and you'd be paying about $15 a can and have a factory to shelf margin of about a day.

Also, what exactly would you like to see as the first ingredient in soup besides water? That kinda threw me for a loop...
 
2012-08-22 05:38:57 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Is soup more of a colder-climate thing? Living in FL, I never get hungry and think I'd like a hot bowl of chunky liquid.


I thought the same, but then, few places are worse than Vietnam and they have Pho...
 
2012-08-22 05:39:04 PM

tlchwi02: just make chicken and stars


And this:

homepage.ntlworld.com

/The Missus will luv it!
//All-natural ingredients
 
2012-08-22 05:41:26 PM
I want Campbell's to bring their ground beef and noodle soup back. I love it.
All you hipster food truck douches step to the end of the line.
 
2012-08-22 05:41:47 PM
Word is Austin currently has 2000 to 2500 food trucks. The regulations here embrace it. They are amazing amazing amazing. Anyone reading this could justify a plane ticket just to eat at the trucks. East Side King being the best (Paul qui of James beard and top chef fame.)
 
2012-08-22 05:47:57 PM

pute kisses like a man: the truck based restaurant is the current source of inspiration in the culinary world. the low overhead costs lead to real innovation, because no one has to be concerned about serving the same tired old cuisine. there is the possibility of lot more unique approaches to cuisine in these openly experimental world of truck kitchens.



Yep.  And licensing is much, much easier.  Yes, you have to get licensed and inspected... but there's just so much less going on.  I love our up and coming food truck culture in New Orleans.
 
2012-08-22 05:55:51 PM
How about some seasonings other than 3x the daily recommended limit for salt? Campbells soup taste like Campbells soup, even their chili... tastes like the vegetable soup with some extra beans in it, just distinct Campbells flavor, no cumin or chili powder to be found.
 
2012-08-22 06:02:23 PM

downstairs: pute kisses like a man: the truck based restaurant is the current source of inspiration in the culinary world. the low overhead costs lead to real innovation, because no one has to be concerned about serving the same tired old cuisine. there is the possibility of lot more unique approaches to cuisine in these openly experimental world of truck kitchens.


Yep.  And licensing is much, much easier.  Yes, you have to get licensed and inspected... but there's just so much less going on.  I love our up and coming food truck culture in New Orleans.


Hey if Licky Dogs can get permits they aren't too strict.
 
2012-08-22 06:03:32 PM

AbbeySomeone: downstairs: pute kisses like a man: the truck based restaurant is the current source of inspiration in the culinary world. the low overhead costs lead to real innovation, because no one has to be concerned about serving the same tired old cuisine. there is the possibility of lot more unique approaches to cuisine in these openly experimental world of truck kitchens.


Yep.  And licensing is much, much easier.  Yes, you have to get licensed and inspected... but there's just so much less going on.  I love our up and coming food truck culture in New Orleans.

Hey if Licky Dogs can get permits they aren't too strict.


Dammit - Lucky Dogs

/blames Freud
 
2012-08-22 06:10:58 PM
Cilantro has been proven to reduce intelligence, damage reproductive organs, and taste like shiat.
 
2012-08-22 06:13:53 PM
I tried Campbell's tomato soup recently after not having had it in over a decade. Is MSG the main ingredient now?

/felt like a crack addict overdosing on soup for a few days before it started to taste like blah and I quit.
 
2012-08-22 06:16:08 PM
You had a Campbell's lately? It's a sad trash in a tiny canister. If you want any flavor, you'd best pour some hot sauce in it. Be forewarned, however, that liquid mess will tear through your nether regions in hours flat. I swear I put out two full gallons of liquid waste. In two full days. I was past the point of moaning, you know? It was just gushes of liquid. And more gushes. And more gushes.

I had the Blazin' sauce at the Buffalo Wild Wings. That mess was so gentle on my sphincter in comparison. It was like triple fluff-buff wipes.
 
2012-08-22 06:18:20 PM

AbbeySomeone: AbbeySomeone: downstairs: pute kisses like a man: the truck based restaurant is the current source of inspiration in the culinary world. the low overhead costs lead to real innovation, because no one has to be concerned about serving the same tired old cuisine. there is the possibility of lot more unique approaches to cuisine in these openly experimental world of truck kitchens.


Yep.  And licensing is much, much easier.  Yes, you have to get licensed and inspected... but there's just so much less going on.  I love our up and coming food truck culture in New Orleans.

Hey if Licky Dogs can get permits they aren't too strict.

Dammit - Lucky Dogs

/blames Freud


lucky dogs is a blight.... and I don't think they got licensed so much as they got grandfathered in and then bribed the local legislation to ensure they'd have a monopoly in the quarter.

which is very sad, because they have been the only street food vendor allowed in the quarter for a long time... there was a famous case, I think it made it to the Louisiana supreme court, regarding the ordinance that granted lucky dog a complete monopoly in the quarter. i think the law was something like, no one may be a street vendor unless they were a street vendor as of (some less then random date). so, basically, lucky dog was the only one. all the other street vendors came after the date, so they were barred from business. they sued and they lost, like normal, because someone else was better at paying the right people.

truck restaurants are completely different, and new orleans recently loosened, is in the process of loosen, or might loosen restrictions against truck restaurants near the quarter. it can do nothing but increase the culinary quality of a city.

/ the truck kitchens I know of and would go out of the way to eat at is the one by dos hefes, the purple truck, that truck that's somewhere in someone's backyard in midcity/bayou st john (i always get brought here, so i don't know anything else about it, other than it's goodness), and some others, that are around... but I never really know where, I'm usually brought there by someone who is more attentive to the ways of the world than i am.
// the purple truck guy started boucherie. awesome restaurant, awesome truck. kind of funny to go from truck to fine dining. that's the bonus of truck kitchens, they're like test kitchens to see who's good enough to open up shop. and, better food at lower costs, which means cheaper.
 
2012-08-22 06:19:59 PM
How can it be uncool, Andy Warhol painted it?
 
2012-08-22 06:35:07 PM

Porous Horace: Where can I get Campbell's Green Pea soup in Montreal? Help me, fark!


Your kidding, right?

Split pea soup requires a bag of dried split peas (stocked with the beans and rice in the grocery store), a ham shank (meat section, regular ham or even bacon will do, but look for something with the bone for better flavor), and water (That clear stuff from the metal pipe sticking out of your sink).

Pour split peas into pot, separating out any odd cruft; wash them; add water and ham shank; let simmer a couple hours.

/my comfort food soup
//grossed out my elementary school classmates with it
///never had the Campbells version
 
2012-08-22 06:36:37 PM
On thing I love about the food truck culture is that, with the economy so rough, this is a much less expensive way to break into (or try out) running a restaurant. The overhead is low, the startup cost is low, and you don't have to have a really large menu. Just get good at what you make, get used to running a small business, etc.

And, bless their hearts, those Mexican guys still have the taco trucks, which rock for folks who don't want to wait 45 minutes for a six dollar artisanal burger.
 
2012-08-22 06:40:03 PM

Doubletwist-: Here's a tip for the CEO. How about NOT loading your soups up with enough salt to kill a herd of elephants!


But then they might have to use other, more expensive seasonings!
 
2012-08-22 06:48:26 PM

Dahnkster: Dear Campbell's Soup.

Lemme help a brother out.

1. Use ACTUAL chicken or beef stock instead of heavily salted water that got near a chicken beak or cow intestine.


Yes please. pretty sad when I pretty much max out on my salt intake for the day with one can.

/stupid heart failure
 
2012-08-22 06:52:04 PM

pute kisses like a man: AbbeySomeone: AbbeySomeone: downstairs: pute kisses like a man: the truck based restaurant is the current source of inspiration in the culinary world. the low overhead costs lead to real innovation, because no one has to be concerned about serving the same tired old cuisine. there is the possibility of lot more unique approaches to cuisine in these openly experimental world of truck kitchens.


Yep.  And licensing is much, much easier.  Yes, you have to get licensed and inspected... but there's just so much less going on.  I love our up and coming food truck culture in New Orleans.

Hey if Licky Dogs can get permits they aren't too strict.

Dammit - Lucky Dogs

/blames Freud

lucky dogs is a blight.... and I don't think they got licensed so much as they got grandfathered in and then bribed the local legislation to ensure they'd have a monopoly in the quarter.

which is very sad, because they have been the only street food vendor allowed in the quarter for a long time... there was a famous case, I think it made it to the Louisiana supreme court, regarding the ordinance that granted lucky dog a complete monopoly in the quarter. i think the law was something like, no one may be a street vendor unless they were a street vendor as of (some less then random date). so, basically, lucky dog was the only one. all the other street vendors came after the date, so they were barred from business. they sued and they lost, like normal, because someone else was better at paying the right people.

truck restaurants are completely different, and new orleans recently loosened, is in the process of loosen, or might loosen restrictions against truck restaurants near the quarter. it can do nothing but increase the culinary quality of a city.

/ the truck kitchens I know of and would go out of the way to eat at is the one by dos hefes, the purple truck, that truck that's somewhere in someone's backyard in midcity/bayou st john (i always get brought here, so i don't know anything el ...


I read this before I ever spent time in the Quarter and did not venture near those carts.
daily.greencine.com

Dull Cow Eyes: I tried Campbell's tomato soup recently after not having had it in over a decade. Is MSG the main ingredient now?

/felt like a crack addict overdosing on soup for a few days before it started to taste like blah and I quit.


MSG has several different names and forms
/allergies

/image hot like Mrs. Reilly's wine bottle
 
2012-08-22 06:55:32 PM
Cilantro. More cilantro!

And fresh-tasting (cilantro), not all cooked and smushy.
 
2012-08-22 06:58:46 PM

Contents Under Pressure: (Insert imallrightwiththis.gif)

Good on her. The whole food truck thing is a younger market, very cutting edge in a lot of cases. She goes out of her way to investigate this and, if she succeeds, she suddenly has a huge new demographic with, potentially, years of brand loyalty ahead of them.

/logging into etrade.com
//seriously.


Do some research on their corporate culture first. Stodgy places with mature product lines tend to beat the shiat out of anybody with ideas. My guess is she gets canned within a year.

/that was not a pun
 
2012-08-22 07:06:50 PM

Fursecution: Porous Horace: Where can I get Campbell's Green Pea soup in Montreal? Help me, fark!

Your kidding, right?

Split pea soup requires a bag of dried split peas (stocked with the beans and rice in the grocery store), a ham shank (meat section, regular ham or even bacon will do, but look for something with the bone for better flavor), and water (That clear stuff from the metal pipe sticking out of your sink).

Pour split peas into pot, separating out any odd cruft; wash them; add water and ham shank; let simmer a couple hours.

/my comfort food soup
//grossed out my elementary school classmates with it
///never had the Campbells version


Your stupid, right?

Hint: "green" and "split" are not the same word or thing.
Here are pictures:
delicious-cooks.com
Split Pea

www.quickfreerecipes.com
Green Pea

Cans:
ecx.images-amazon.com
Split Pea

www.campbellsoup.com
Green Pea


Now, can anyone tell me where I can buy Campbell's Green Pea soup (check pics if you don't know what that is) in Montreal?
 
2012-08-22 07:12:43 PM
Oh, and I live in Quebec. Split pea soup isn't exactly hard to come by here, in fact it's so popular it's a slur.

Campbell's Green Pea soup is usually more expensive than their regular soups, possibly due to all that green pea-ness.
 
2012-08-22 07:16:01 PM
My favorites were Scotch broth and noodles and ground beef. Can't find either anymore.


I'm so sad now.
 
2012-08-22 07:16:38 PM

Strobeguy: Tell you what. When me and my wife and son were struggling after graduation a can
of chunky soup over rice was a nice break from hotdogs and beans.


Amen! Beefish rice saves the day.

Beef broth + sticky asian rice = cheap tummy filler
 
2012-08-22 07:37:00 PM
Approves

unrealitymag.com
 
2012-08-22 07:40:37 PM

Dahnkster: Dear Campbell's Soup.

Lemme help a brother out.

1. Use ACTUAL chicken or beef stock instead of heavily salted water that got near a chicken beak or cow intestine.
2. REAL cream in your 'Cream of' Soups.
3. When your first ingredient says 'water', you're doing it wrong.
4. I know I already touched on the excess salt, but you really don't seem to have a farking clue.
5. Chunks of meat, not tiny sterile pale bits of processed rubber.
6. Look into cumin, cayenne, bay leaves, leeks, cilantro, thyme, curry blends, Worcestershire, Tabasco, cracked black pepper.

Begin here and then get back to me. I realize that some people like the taste of your tomato. Clueless kids will eat chicken and noodles or chicken with star-shaped processed rice. And tradition says your Cream of mushroom needs to go into green bean casserole (it does not). The 1960's were over 50 years ago. My gumbo, Butternut squash and roasted garlic, Cock-a-leekie soup, minestrone, oyster stew or baked stuffed potato soup will leave your corporate-dick ass wash in the dirt.


DAMN straight!
 
2012-08-22 07:42:42 PM

Porous Horace: Fursecution: Porous Horace: Where can I get Campbell's Green Pea soup in Montreal? Help me, fark!

Your kidding, right?

Split pea soup requires a bag of dried split peas (stocked with the beans and rice in the grocery store), a ham shank (meat section, regular ham or even bacon will do, but look for something with the bone for better flavor), and water (That clear stuff from the metal pipe sticking out of your sink).

Pour split peas into pot, separating out any odd cruft; wash them; add water and ham shank; let simmer a couple hours.

/my comfort food soup
//grossed out my elementary school classmates with it
///never had the Campbells version

Your stupid, right?

Hint: "green" and "split" are not the same word or thing.
Here are pictures:
[delicious-cooks.com image 496x322]
Split Pea

[www.quickfreerecipes.com image 470x313]
Green Pea

Cans:
[ecx.images-amazon.com image 300x300]
Split Pea

[www.campbellsoup.com image 255x275]
Green Pea


Now, can anyone tell me where I can buy Campbell's Green Pea soup (check pics if you don't know what that is) in Montreal?


Both look pretty good...but food porn is easy to fake...
 
2012-08-22 07:45:42 PM

Spiralmonkey: Campbells condensed mushroom soup used as a sauce for pasta, that was haute cuisine when I was a student.


It's also a great base for Beef (or chicken) Stroganoff. Reconstitute with sour cream instead of water for extra yummyness.
 
2012-08-22 07:52:25 PM

ZeroPly: Do you have ANY clue how modern industrialized food production works? Sure, Campbell could do all those things, and you'd be paying about $15 a can and have a factory to shelf margin of about a day.


Progresso does a much better job of using spices other than salt, decent chunks of identifiable meat, etc. It's not home-made, but it's an acceptable heat-and-eat meal.
 
2012-08-22 08:58:04 PM

Porous Horace: ...


Huh. Didn't know there was a difference. Learn something new every day.

/Bag of frozen peas and a blender?
 
2012-08-22 09:11:23 PM
Wait, Campbell's has their headquarters in Jersey and they went out of state to sample the cooking at food trucks? Jersey's home grown grease trucks weren't good enough for her Royal Highness? Fark her. 

media.nj.com
 
2012-08-22 09:44:07 PM
ewww Cilantro takes like dish soap. Please keep it out of anything I eat.
 
2012-08-22 09:51:58 PM

Fissile: Wait, Campbell's has their headquarters in Jersey and they went out of state to sample the cooking at food trucks? Jersey's home grown grease trucks weren't good enough for her Royal Highness? Fark her. 

[media.nj.com image 512x341]


Maybe she figured that since the Grease Trucks' days are numbered there wasn't any point in going there.
 
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