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(Des Moines Register)   Dear Madam, Gems, tuning forks and vitamins are not viable health treatments. Stop claiming it is. Sincerely, The Iowa Board of Medicine   (desmoinesregister.com) divider line 145
    More: Unlikely, Iowa Board, sewage treatment, essential oils, vitamins, Dubuque  
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4480 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Aug 2012 at 11:31 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-22 12:27:16 PM  
www.tvequals.com

Agree
 
2012-08-22 12:32:40 PM  

doubled99: Dumbasses. It's magnets


How the fark do they work?!?
 
2012-08-22 12:46:04 PM  

Treygreen13: Mr Guy: Treygreen13: Tuning forks can be used to detect fractures in bones.

Vibrating a fracture at a resonance frequency sounds more painful than an X-Ray to me.

I've never had a fracture, let alone had one vibrated at a certain frequency. I would assume it would be painful.
/handy if you can't get to an X-Ray machine or don't want to bombard yourself with radiation


Stay out of airplanes and off the top of mountains then. Moden X-rays aren't that much of a radiation exposure when compared to the annual background dose everyone gets. Just don't go get them daily and you'll be fine.
 
2012-08-22 12:48:13 PM  

heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine. Anyways, color therapy sounds kinda bogus but herbs and acupuncture and acupressure do work.


Only the good parts like sticking pins in people and arranging furniture. The part with tiger bones and bear bile is hare-brained, supersticious quackery. Right?
 
2012-08-22 12:49:37 PM  
Vitamin E topically and Vitamin A internally cleared up my adult acne. Just sayin.

Vitamin B complex did it for me.
It's almost like individual people have differing vitamin needs - as if they eat different foods and their bodies process things with different efficiencies!
 
2012-08-22 12:50:40 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine. Anyways, color therapy sounds kinda bogus but herbs and acupuncture and acupressure do work.

The Chinese also believe rhino horns and tiger balls will prevent impotence. That doesn't mean it works.


Then how come there are so many Chinese people?
 
2012-08-22 12:54:00 PM  

EdNortonsTwin: Vitamin E topically and Vitamin A internally cleared up my adult acne. Just sayin.


The super high dosage of vitamin A that my friend took to treat his awful acne gave him Crohn's. Nice stuff.
 
2012-08-22 12:55:57 PM  

NuttierThanEver: Treygreen13: Tuning forks can be used to detect fractures in bones.

You got some literature to back that up there Sparky?


You poke a person who has been in an accident with a tuning fork. When they say "ow" you found the fracture.
 
2012-08-22 12:58:41 PM  

bhcompy: EdNortonsTwin: Vitamin E topically and Vitamin A internally cleared up my adult acne. Just sayin.

The super high dosage of vitamin A that my friend took to treat his awful acne gave him Crohn's. Nice stuff.


I call BS on that one. Unless Vitamin A can suddenly make your entire immune system misbehave to the point where it treats your colon as a foreign body that needs to be destroyed.
 
2012-08-22 12:58:56 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: Tyrone Slothrop: heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine. Anyways, color therapy sounds kinda bogus but herbs and acupuncture and acupressure do work.

The Chinese also believe rhino horns and tiger balls will prevent impotence. That doesn't mean it works.

Then how come there are so many Chinese people?


Exactly. I don't have health insurance so we go to Ching Chong's mini-market down the street. Nice old chinese lady who works there. They don't carry rhino horns, though. I've asked.
 
jvl
2012-08-22 01:00:43 PM  

EdNortonsTwin: Vitamin E topically and Vitamin A internally cleared up my adult acne. Just sayin.


Yeah. Sometimes Acne goes away by itself, which is probably what happened in your case.

(My first hint that you were mistaken is this: vitamins aren't absorbed topically)
 
2012-08-22 01:01:44 PM  

Charlie Chingas: BarkingUnicorn: Tyrone Slothrop: heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine. Anyways, color therapy sounds kinda bogus but herbs and acupuncture and acupressure do work.

The Chinese also believe rhino horns and tiger balls will prevent impotence. That doesn't mean it works.

Then how come there are so many Chinese people?

Exactly. I don't have health insurance so we go to Ching Chong's mini-market down the street. Nice old chinese lady who works there. They don't carry rhino horns, though. I've asked.


Charlie Chingas checks Ching Chong's Chinese checker.
 
2012-08-22 01:03:34 PM  

Teknowaffle: NuttierThanEver: Treygreen13: Tuning forks can be used to detect fractures in bones.

You got some literature to back that up there Sparky?

You poke a person who has been in an accident with a tuning fork. When they say "ow" you found the fracture.


Well the idea is (roughly) that it vibrates the bone and causes discomfort at the location of the fracture. I've personally witnessed a doctor do it to detect a fracture in a friend. Of course, he went to get x-rays after that and went through the whole diagnosis procedure to be sure. But it was effective for not needing any equipment and told the doctor to investigate further rather than to advise my friend to lay off exercise for a while.

NuttierThanEver took my comment that it can be used to detect fractures to mean that it is the only way to detect fractures and no other method can do it, not even doctors or X-rays, and that I'm a moron for ever suggesting that it can be used, and that my proof from the U.S. National Library of Medicine only shows an 81% detection rate, which is wholly unacceptable. But he's also a pedantic douche-sandwich.
 
2012-08-22 01:06:11 PM  

Treygreen13: Teknowaffle: NuttierThanEver: Treygreen13: Tuning forks can be used to detect fractures in bones.

You got some literature to back that up there Sparky?

You poke a person who has been in an accident with a tuning fork. When they say "ow" you found the fracture.

Well the idea is (roughly) that it vibrates the bone and causes discomfort at the location of the fracture. I've personally witnessed a doctor do it to detect a fracture in a friend. Of course, he went to get x-rays after that and went through the whole diagnosis procedure to be sure. But it was effective for not needing any equipment and told the doctor to investigate further rather than to advise my friend to lay off exercise for a while.

NuttierThanEver took my comment that it can be used to detect fractures to mean that it is the only way to detect fractures and no other method can do it, not even doctors or X-rays, and that I'm a moron for ever suggesting that it can be used, and that my proof from the U.S. National Library of Medicine only shows an 81% detection rate, which is wholly unacceptable. But he's also a pedantic douche-sandwich.


Does it taste like salt and vinegar?
 
2012-08-22 01:07:23 PM  

Charlie Chingas: Does it taste like salt and vinegar?


With fish.
 
2012-08-22 01:08:40 PM  

Elfich: bhcompy: EdNortonsTwin: Vitamin E topically and Vitamin A internally cleared up my adult acne. Just sayin.

The super high dosage of vitamin A that my friend took to treat his awful acne gave him Crohn's. Nice stuff.

I call BS on that one. Unless Vitamin A can suddenly make your entire immune system misbehave to the point where it treats your colon as a foreign body that needs to be destroyed.


Shrug. Accutane is known to cause Crohn's and is a vitamin A metabolite
 
2012-08-22 01:09:11 PM  

heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine. Anyways, color therapy sounds kinda bogus but herbs and acupuncture and acupressure do work.


Acupressure/puncture relieves stress and sometimes pain, it does NOT fix any underlying conditions that cause chronic pain. In other words, it's basically a much more expensive alternative to tylenol, aspirin, or vicoden. Chiropracty can fix the single underlying problem of bone alignment causing muscle spasms, and massage can fix a number of muscular and sometimes a few skeletal problems. That doesn't make them alternatives to anything if you're actually, you know, sick.

That said, I'd definitely get acupuncture by someone who trained for a few years under an acknowledged master. Problem is, all of the acupuncture studios, salons, and hospitals around here give it to you by someone who trained for 2-3 weeks in a classroom, and the injury rate is as high as you'd expect.
 
2012-08-22 01:11:19 PM  
What about the Goggles?
 
2012-08-22 01:14:37 PM  

heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine. Anyways, color therapy sounds kinda bogus but herbs and acupuncture and acupressure do work.


My Neurologist is from China. He's treating my carpal tunnel with medicine, not accupuncture.
 
2012-08-22 01:16:46 PM  

foxyshadis: heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine. Anyways, color therapy sounds kinda bogus but herbs and acupuncture and acupressure do work.

Acupressure/puncture relieves stress and sometimes pain, it does NOT fix any underlying conditions that cause chronic pain. In other words, it's basically a much more expensive alternative to tylenol, aspirin, or vicoden. Chiropracty can fix the single underlying problem of bone alignment causing muscle spasms, and massage can fix a number of muscular and sometimes a few skeletal problems. That doesn't make them alternatives to anything if you're actually, you know, sick.

That said, I'd definitely get acupuncture by someone who trained for a few years under an acknowledged master. Problem is, all of the acupuncture studios, salons, and hospitals around here give it to you by someone who trained for 2-3 weeks in a classroom, and the injury rate is as high as you'd expect.


You can stick needles in yourself in random places and get the same results as from an "acknowledged master". It turns out that there's no such thing as chi, but there are such things as endorphins.
 
2012-08-22 01:17:14 PM  
Madam? I am not a madam, I am a lady.
 
jvl
2012-08-22 01:17:40 PM  

heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine.


That's a myth. China's culture was no more modern that any other dozen places. The myth comes from their earliest records, written around 500BC, which claims a very long history which is obviously made up.
 
2012-08-22 01:17:51 PM  

bhcompy: Elfich: bhcompy: EdNortonsTwin: Vitamin E topically and Vitamin A internally cleared up my adult acne. Just sayin.

The super high dosage of vitamin A that my friend took to treat his awful acne gave him Crohn's. Nice stuff.

I call BS on that one. Unless Vitamin A can suddenly make your entire immune system misbehave to the point where it treats your colon as a foreign body that needs to be destroyed.

Shrug. Accutane is known to cause Crohn's and is a vitamin A metabolite


Ok, I can see that.

I'm pretty sensitive to snake oil claims claiming to cause or cure Crohns. I had a fun week long stay in the hosptital due to crohns, followed by some significant changes to what I can eat and am on some heavy duty drugs to keep the crohns in remission.
 
2012-08-22 01:21:58 PM  

JWideman: foxyshadis: heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine. Anyways, color therapy sounds kinda bogus but herbs and acupuncture and acupressure do work.

Acupressure/puncture relieves stress and sometimes pain, it does NOT fix any underlying conditions that cause chronic pain. In other words, it's basically a much more expensive alternative to tylenol, aspirin, or vicoden. Chiropracty can fix the single underlying problem of bone alignment causing muscle spasms, and massage can fix a number of muscular and sometimes a few skeletal problems. That doesn't make them alternatives to anything if you're actually, you know, sick.

That said, I'd definitely get acupuncture by someone who trained for a few years under an acknowledged master. Problem is, all of the acupuncture studios, salons, and hospitals around here give it to you by someone who trained for 2-3 weeks in a classroom, and the injury rate is as high as you'd expect.

You can stick needles in yourself in random places and get the same results as from an "acknowledged master". It turns out that there's no such thing as chi, but there are such things as endorphins.


An actual scientist would state that we do not have a test for "chi" so we can't determine what someone's chi level's are. Once we can test for that we can determine if it has an actual effect on someone's health.
 
jvl
2012-08-22 01:25:48 PM  

Elfich: An actual scientist would state that we do not have a test for "chi" so we can't determine what someone's chi level's are. Once we can test for that we can determine if it has an actual effect on someone's health.


Incorrect. It is sufficient to observe that a "Master" is no more effective than some guy randomly poking about to conclude that the "Master" has no correct knowledge about how some Woo force works.
 
2012-08-22 01:36:37 PM  

Lone Stranger: So this double-ended 10 inch long quartz crystal I put up my ass every day is doing nothing for my colon cancer and swollen prostrate?


no. But it's doing wonders for my erectile dysfunction.
 
2012-08-22 01:37:14 PM  
Actually, in Europe most (all?) medical doctors are taught at least some "alternative" medicine.

I'm as tin-foil-hat resistant as most of you, but there really is some interesting history of the FDA and how they (and more recently pharmaceutical companies) essentially pushed other therapies and methods to the side. It was very much agenda-driven.

There's some very interesting stuff that goes on in determining which medicines "work". Even moreso with HOW they work. Science can't actually tell you how, chemically, many medicines do their job. We know they work only because of massive trials and experiments. These experiments show medicine X as having effect Y in a certain percentage of patients. That a long way off from actually knowing what's going on chemically. Similarly there are many alternative medicines and therapies and techniques that work, but perhaps we don't know exactly why. The difference is the way they are applied maybe doesn't lend itself to clinical trials, so it's difficult to PROVE they work, but they cannot also be disproven. Combine that with teh money needed to run experiments and the fact that large companies don't run experiments on things that they later can't monetize and market and you see why alternative medicine is lagging.

"alternative" medicine is a catch-all phrase for a whole spectrum of stuff. From what I'd call "woo-woo" to fully evidence and scientific trial-based use of certain herbs. Hell, there's all kinds of stuff that started as herbal medicine, and once the chemicals were isolated moved toward more conventional marketing and sale. Digitalis, for example.
 
jvl
2012-08-22 01:49:19 PM  

jimmythefly: Actually, in Europe most (all?) medical doctors are taught at least some "alternative" medicine.


So all those doctors are taught it.... and still they can't cough up a decent peer-reviewed proof of efficacy?

That should be your first hint that it is not effective.

jimmythefly: The difference is the way they are applied maybe doesn't lend itself to clinical trials, so it's difficult to PROVE they work, but they cannot also be disproven.


Nonsense. If there is a claimed repeatable effect, then it can be measured and proven.
 
2012-08-22 01:57:38 PM  

Treygreen13: Mr Guy: Treygreen13: Tuning forks can be used to detect fractures in bones.

Vibrating a fracture at a resonance frequency sounds more painful than an X-Ray to me.

I've never had a fracture, let alone had one vibrated at a certain frequency. I would assume it would be painful.
/handy if you can't get to an X-Ray machine or don't want to bombard yourself with radiation


It is painful, but very effective.

NuttierThanEver: Treygreen13: Tuning forks can be used to detect fractures in bones.

You got some literature to back that up there Sparky?


I have you favorited as a skeptical idiot, but as a favor here you go:
Link
 
2012-08-22 02:03:05 PM  

Barbaro's Broken Ankle: Treygreen13: Mr Guy: Treygreen13: Tuning forks can be used to detect fractures in bones.

Vibrating a fracture at a resonance frequency sounds more painful than an X-Ray to me.

I've never had a fracture, let alone had one vibrated at a certain frequency. I would assume it would be painful.
/handy if you can't get to an X-Ray machine or don't want to bombard yourself with radiation

It is painful, but very effective.NuttierThanEver: Treygreen13: Tuning forks can be used to detect fractures in bones.

You got some literature to back that up there Sparky?

I have you favorited as a skeptical idiot, but as a favor here you go:
Link


I addressed that study in a previous post. Using you link a fracture would be missed 20 % of the time.

Also since I am a pedantic douchebag I will point out that an idiot has an IQ of Good Day to you sir!
 
2012-08-22 02:04:57 PM  
oops I am an idiot
my post got nuked
That's what I get for Farking by mobile phone
I meant to finish by pointing out that a idiot would be unable to type/read this thread. Therefore I must be a moron and would like the courtesy of being referred to as one.
 
2012-08-22 02:08:48 PM  

NuttierThanEver: I addressed that study in a previous post. Using you link a fracture would be missed 20 % of the time.


What percentage of success would you say is acceptable before you can say it is used to detect fractures? 100%?

If so, you'll have to accept the idea that sometimes physicians misdiagnose on occasion, and that X-rays do not detect some fractures (like hairline fractures) 100% of the time either. So then you're looking at a CT scan, or an MRI.
 
2012-08-22 02:10:31 PM  

Elfich: bhcompy: EdNortonsTwin: Vitamin E topically and Vitamin A internally cleared up my adult acne. Just sayin.

The super high dosage of vitamin A that my friend took to treat his awful acne gave him Crohn's. Nice stuff.

I call BS on that one. Unless Vitamin A can suddenly make your entire immune system misbehave to the point where it treats your colon as a foreign body that needs to be destroyed.


Funny story. See, retinoic acid (a metabolite of vitamin A) is an important signaling molecule in the intestines for training your immune system to distinguish between self and non-self, commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Too much vitamin A can definitely screw up that balance, since it's mainly in the intestines where that balance is important.
 
2012-08-22 02:16:45 PM  

jvl: Elfich: An actual scientist would state that we do not have a test for "chi" so we can't determine what someone's chi level's are. Once we can test for that we can determine if it has an actual effect on someone's health.

Incorrect. It is sufficient to observe that a "Master" is no more effective than some guy randomly poking about to conclude that the "Master" has no correct knowledge about how some Woo force works.


Which only disproves that chi is something that person knows how to control. It does not preclude the existence of chi, which sounds an AWFUL lot like the idea that the body actually runs on minute chemically produced electricity, and that by correctly stimulating the right muscles, (ie, fixing your posture and weakness problems through exercise), you can achieve a greater over all health, even if you can't point to anything being obviously directly wrong with you in the first place.

That's more or less right, just voodoofied.
 
2012-08-22 02:17:04 PM  

dustygrimp: The big issue with these things is how they are presented. If you tell people, "Don't go to a doctor. Just bang this tuning fork twice a day. The vibrations will kill the cancer cells. That'll be $250," then you are preying on stupid people. If you are offering it up as a non-science based alternative or supplemental treatment, have at it.


No, the problem is that one method has a real chance to help the afflicted and the other will get them killed.
 
2012-08-22 02:17:17 PM  

NuttierThanEver: oops I am an idiot
my post got nuked
That's what I get for Farking by mobile phone
I meant to finish by pointing out that a idiot would be unable to type/read this thread. Therefore I must be a moron and would like the courtesy of being referred to as one.


No, no; the other way was much more amusing.
 
2012-08-22 02:17:52 PM  

Fano: What about the Goggles?


Nothing.

NOOOOOOOOOOOOTHING.
 
2012-08-22 02:21:05 PM  

Mr Guy: jvl: Elfich: An actual scientist would state that we do not have a test for "chi" so we can't determine what someone's chi level's are. Once we can test for that we can determine if it has an actual effect on someone's health.

Incorrect. It is sufficient to observe that a "Master" is no more effective than some guy randomly poking about to conclude that the "Master" has no correct knowledge about how some Woo force works.

Which only disproves that chi is something that person knows how to control. It does not preclude the existence of chi, which sounds an AWFUL lot like the idea that the body actually runs on minute chemically produced electricity, and that by correctly stimulating the right muscles, (ie, fixing your posture and weakness problems through exercise), you can achieve a greater over all health, even if you can't point to anything being obviously directly wrong with you in the first place.

That's more or less right, just voodoofied.


Unfortunately, none of the acupuncture literature backs your statements. Acupuncture chi lines do not follow nerves (where the electricity is flowing), and sham treatments of acupuncture have been shown to work better than real acupuncture treatments.
 
2012-08-22 02:32:52 PM  

jvl: heyheyjerky: Do people forget that China had medicine and a thriving culture thousand of years before modern western medicine.

That's a myth. China's culture was no more modern that any other dozen places. The myth comes from their earliest records, written around 500BC, which claims a very long history which is obviously made up.


I could give you a dozen+ citations disputing that but I won't bother. We obviously read different types of history, assuming you read for pleasure at all.
 
2012-08-22 02:36:31 PM  

jimmythefly: Actually, in Europe most (all?) medical doctors are taught at least some "alternative" medicine.

I'm as tin-foil-hat resistant as most of you, but there really is some interesting history of the FDA and how they (and more recently pharmaceutical companies) essentially pushed other therapies and methods to the side. It was very much agenda-driven.

There's some very interesting stuff that goes on in determining which medicines "work". Even moreso with HOW they work. Science can't actually tell you how, chemically, many medicines do their job. We know they work only because of massive trials and experiments. These experiments show medicine X as having effect Y in a certain percentage of patients. That a long way off from actually knowing what's going on chemically. Similarly there are many alternative medicines and therapies and techniques that work, but perhaps we don't know exactly why. The difference is the way they are applied maybe doesn't lend itself to clinical trials, so it's difficult to PROVE they work, but they cannot also be disproven. Combine that with teh money needed to run experiments and the fact that large companies don't run experiments on things that they later can't monetize and market and you see why alternative medicine is lagging.

"alternative" medicine is a catch-all phrase for a whole spectrum of stuff. From what I'd call "woo-woo" to fully evidence and scientific trial-based use of certain herbs. Hell, there's all kinds of stuff that started as herbal medicine, and once the chemicals were isolated moved toward more conventional marketing and sale. Digitalis, for example.


You win this thread. +1
 
2012-08-22 02:37:39 PM  

jimmythefly: "alternative" medicine is a catch-all phrase for a whole spectrum of stuff. From what I'd call "woo-woo" to fully evidence and scientific trial-based use of certain herbs. Hell, there's all kinds of stuff that started as herbal medicine, and once the chemicals were isolated moved toward more conventional marketing and sale. Digitalis, for example.


You know what you call alternative medicine that's been rigorously tested, run through the scientific process, and adapted for use to treat a specific ailment?

Medicine.

There's no such thing as alternative medicine. It's either medicine, something that could potentially become medicine, or bullshiat. Most of the time it's bullshiat.
 
2012-08-22 02:41:42 PM  

NuttierThanEver: oops I am an idiot
my post got nuked
That's what I get for Farking by mobile phone
I meant to finish by pointing out that a idiot would be unable to type/read this thread. Therefore I must be a moron and would like the courtesy of being referred to as one.


How about arrogant about your ignorance? Ignorantly arrogant? I'm not sure which better describes you.
 
2012-08-22 02:47:16 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: jimmythefly: "alternative" medicine is a catch-all phrase for a whole spectrum of stuff. From what I'd call "woo-woo" to fully evidence and scientific trial-based use of certain herbs. Hell, there's all kinds of stuff that started as herbal medicine, and once the chemicals were isolated moved toward more conventional marketing and sale. Digitalis, for example.

You know what you call alternative medicine that's been rigorously tested, run through the scientific process, and adapted for use to treat a specific ailment?

Medicine.

There's no such thing as alternative medicine. It's either medicine, something that could potentially become medicine, or bullshiat. Most of the time it's bullshiat.


A lot of farkers owe Tim Minchin royalties.

There are many "alternative" medicines out there that will become medicines in the future once further study has been applied.
 
jvl
2012-08-22 02:48:36 PM  

spacelord321: There are many "alternative" medicines out there that will become medicines in the future once further study has been applied.


There are many "alternative" medicines out there which have already been disproven. Do you know what they call them? "Alternative medicine."
 
2012-08-22 02:49:50 PM  

jvl: Elfich: An actual scientist would state that we do not have a test for "chi" so we can't determine what someone's chi level's are. Once we can test for that we can determine if it has an actual effect on someone's health.

Incorrect. It is sufficient to observe that a "Master" is no more effective than some guy randomly poking about to conclude that the "Master" has no correct knowledge about how some Woo force works.


Well, when you prove to me that the woo force exists and that it affects my health, then we can talk about whether or not the Master can wield it more effectively than some schmo off the street.
 
2012-08-22 02:53:37 PM  

hstein3: Elfich: bhcompy: EdNortonsTwin: Vitamin E topically and Vitamin A internally cleared up my adult acne. Just sayin.

The super high dosage of vitamin A that my friend took to treat his awful acne gave him Crohn's. Nice stuff.

I call BS on that one. Unless Vitamin A can suddenly make your entire immune system misbehave to the point where it treats your colon as a foreign body that needs to be destroyed.

Funny story. See, retinoic acid (a metabolite of vitamin A) is an important signaling molecule in the intestines for training your immune system to distinguish between self and non-self, commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Too much vitamin A can definitely screw up that balance, since it's mainly in the intestines where that balance is important.


Wonderful, just what I wanted to hear. But since I am living with this now, I don't think there is much I can do about it. Unless someone has come up with a scientifically researched treatment that is better than what I am on.
 
2012-08-22 02:57:30 PM  
Okay, I've got a tuning fork, now where do I stick it?

But I've already got two crystals there!
 
2012-08-22 02:59:38 PM  

spacelord321: There are many "alternative" medicines out there that will become medicines in the future once further study has been applied.


That doesn't mean anything. It's just gutless weasel words so you can just come back later and claim every single new thing was "alternative medicine" at one time. Grow a pair and stake a real claim that you can be held to.

Alternative medicine means a non-medicine alternative to real medicine. I know this surprises some people, but words mean things, and those words mean "not medicine".

Alternative medicine is bullshiat. Future medicine is a hypothesis. Only medicine is medicine.
 
2012-08-22 03:00:43 PM  

Elfich: hstein3: Elfich: bhcompy: EdNortonsTwin: Vitamin E topically and Vitamin A internally cleared up my adult acne. Just sayin.

The super high dosage of vitamin A that my friend took to treat his awful acne gave him Crohn's. Nice stuff.

I call BS on that one. Unless Vitamin A can suddenly make your entire immune system misbehave to the point where it treats your colon as a foreign body that needs to be destroyed.

Funny story. See, retinoic acid (a metabolite of vitamin A) is an important signaling molecule in the intestines for training your immune system to distinguish between self and non-self, commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Too much vitamin A can definitely screw up that balance, since it's mainly in the intestines where that balance is important.

Wonderful, just what I wanted to hear. But since I am living with this now, I don't think there is much I can do about it. Unless someone has come up with a scientifically researched treatment that is better than what I am on.


How do you feel about parasites?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminthic_therapy
 
2012-08-22 03:05:35 PM  

hstein3: How do you feel about parasites?


Hey, let's not bring welfare recipients into this.

AYN RAND IS A GOD!!

/so sorry. please don't hurt me.
 
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